Schrodinger's Rabbits:

Schrodinger's Rabbits:

The Many Worlds of Quantum (2004)

PDF Full Book
282 pages | 6 x 9
978-0-309-54658-4

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PDF Full Book
282 pages | 6 x 9
978-0-309-54658-4

Schrodinger's Rabbits:

The Many Worlds of Quantum (2004)

Contractual obligations prohibit us from offering a free PDF of this title published under the Joseph Henry Press imprint of the National Academies Press.

The views expressed in this book are solely those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Academies.

  • Overview
  • Reviews

Authors

Colin Bruce

Suggested Citation

Schrodinger's Rabbits: The Many Worlds of Quantum. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2004.

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"In these pages, [Bruce] provides an accessible overview of the issues that have plagued physicists working in the quantum world as well as of the Oxford group's possible solutions for those issues."
-- Science News, Dec 18 & 25, 2004

"This awe-inspiring book not only examines the discoveries, theories and concepts of 'old,' but how new information and research has drastically altered those oft out-dated theories and replaced them with theories that even Einstein himself would be proud of. ... Bruce often uses games, experiments and tricks to explain the dynamics of the theories, which make the book somewhat more of a brainteaser than other 'physics' books, and offer the reader a tangible way to 'visualize' the concepts. ... [Bruce] does a great job of blending science fact with speculation and never loses the reader in a mindless bog of equations and arguments. Instead, we are left with a feeling that we actually understand the concepts of locality, of parallel universes, of quantum theory, even if we don t know the intricate weave of math and science behind them. ... The reader is left with a breathtaking sense of what the future holds for scientific discovery, especially in the eerie quantum world where each year, it seems, we come closer and closer to some downright incredible and tantalizing truths about the world we live in, and our place in it."
-- Curled Up with A Good Book

"This is one of the best books to tackle the subject of the care and feeding of the many worlds hypothesis. With no recapping of the basics, this book is a delight in every way, revealing details that other more sober titles have missed, while making sure that the writing is a joy throughout."
-- FOCUS, March 2005

"To the average reader trying to understand current theories of the subatomic quantum world, terms like nonlocality, decoherence and quantum collapse must sound like fantastical notions tossed about at an ivory-tower tea party. British physicist Bruce attempts to put into plain English what physicists, especially those based in Oxford, think is happening in this invisible world that binds the universe together. ... Bruce illustrates these mind-altering concepts via accessible stories and illustrations."
-- Publishers Weekly, October 18

"Schrödinger's Rabbits made me feel less bad for never having understood quantum physics. Excellent for broadening the mind of the non-expert; valuable psychotherapy for the confused physicist."
-- Joao Magueijo, author of Faster Than the Speed of Light

"A lucid and vivid exposition of a murky subject which famously confuses even professional physicists."
-- A. Zee, author of Einstein's Universe and Fearful Symmetry

"Bruce's witty, fast-paced account of current controversies in quantum physics will keep you on the edge of your seat. An eloquent introduction to one of the deepest mysteries in modern science."
-- Paul Halpern, author of The Great Beyond: Higher Dimensions, Parallel Universes and the Extraordinary Search for a Theory of Everything

"Mr. Bruce is our expert tour guide on a wild, thought-provoking ride through the Twilight Zone world of quantum theory, where objects can be two places at the same time, disappear and reappear somewhere else, and exist simultaneously in many parallel universes."
-- Michio Kaku, author of Hyperspace, Parallel Worlds, and Einstein's Cosmos