An International Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facility -- Exploring a Russian Site as a Prototype: Proceedings of an International Workshop
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Description

As part of a long-standing collaboration on nuclear nonproliferation, the National Academy of Sciences and the Russian Academy of Sciences held a joint workshop in Moscow in 2003 on the scientific aspects of an international radioactive disposal site in Russia. The passage of Russian laws permitting the importation and storage of high-level radioactive material (primarily spent nuclear fuel from reactors) has engendered interest from a number of foreign governments, including the U.S., in exploring the possibility of transferring material to Russia on a temporary or permanent basis. The workshop focused on the environmental aspects of the general location and characteristics of a possible storage site, transportation to and within the site, containers for transportation and storage, inventory and accountability, audits and inspections, and handling technologies.

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Publication Info

302 pages | 8 1/2 x 11
Paperback
ISBN: 978-0-309-09688-1
Contents

Table of Contents

skim chapter
Front Matter i-xii
Opening Remarks 1-2
Handling Spent Nuclear Fuel—International Experience -- IAEA Activities in Nuclear Spent Fuel Management 3-11
Analysis of U.S. Experience with Spent Fuel 12-19
Problems of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Storage Site Selection 20-29
Feasibility of Transmutation of Radioactive Elements 30-49
The High Level Waste Disposal Technology Development Program in Korea 50-58
The Use of Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors for Effectively Reprocessing Plutonium and Minor Actinides 59-72
Site Selection for Spent Fuel Storage and Disposal of High Level Waste -- Site Selection for Spent Fuel Storage and Disposal of High Level Waste: Experience of European Countries 73-88
The Private Fuel Limited Liability Company National Spent Fuel Site 89-95
Experience of Japan 96-108
The Current Status of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Korea 109-117
Safe Transport of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Level Waste: International Experience 118-127
Ensuring Nuclear and Radiation Safety During the Transport of Radioactive Materials in Russia 128-142
Problems in Establishing an International Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel in Russia -- Creating an Infrastructure for Managing of Spent Nuclear Fuel 143-151
Current Status of Government Regulation of Activities Associated with the Import of Spent Nuclear Fuel into the Russian Federation Return to the Russian Federation of Irradiated Fuel Assemblies from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Uzbekistan 152-158
Return to the Russian Federation of Irradiated Fuel Assemblies from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Republic of Uzbekistan 159-162
Investment and International Aspects of the Problem of Spent Nuclear Fuel Management 163-165
Creation of an Underground Repository for Spent Nuclear Fuel near the City of Zheleznogorsk (Eastern Siberia) 166-176
Conditions for the Creation of an International Spent Nuclear Fuel Repository near the Priargunsk Mining-Chemical Production Association (City of Krasnokamensk, Chita Oblast) 177-186
Utilization of High-Level Waste -- Types of High-Level Radioactive Wastes Formed as a Result of Dry Methods of Spent Fuel Regeneration and Technologies for their Management 187-198
Chemical Treatment of High Level Waste for Utilization 199-207
Immobilization of High Level Waste: Analysis of Appropriate Synthetic Waste Forms 208-224
The Management of High-Level Radioactive Wastes from the Mayak Production Association and Plans for the Creation of an Underground Laboratory 225-239
Creation of Underground Laboratories at the Mining-Chemical Complex and at Mayak to Study the Suitability of Sites for Underground Isolation of Radioactive Wastes 240-247
Concluding Observations--Milton Levenson 248-250
Appendix A: Workshop Agenda 251-256
Appendix B: Environmental Effects of Radiation in the Russian Federation 257-259
Appendix C: Geochemistry of Actinides During the Long-Term Storage and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel 260-290
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National Research Council. An International Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Facility -- Exploring a Russian Site as a Prototype: Proceedings of an International Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2005.

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