TABLE 1-3 Age-Adjusted Rates for Four Major Causes of Death from Cancer by Ethnic Groupa (rate per 100,000)b

Cancer

White

African-American

Asian American/Pacific Islander

Native American

Hispanicc

Lung and bronchus

 

Males

69.5

99.5

34.2

40.9

31.6

Females

34.0

33.0

14.9

19.8

11.0

Colon and rectum

 

Males

21.3

27.7

13.1

11.6

13.1

Females

14.3

19.9

8.9

8.9

8.3

Prostate (males)

23.3

54.1

10.4

14.2

16.2

Breast (females)

25.3

31.4

11.2

12.1

15.1

aData are from the American Cancer Society, Surveillance Research (2001). SOURCE: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program, Division of Cancer Control and Population Science, National Cancer Institute (2000). Mortality derived from data originating from the National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2000).

bPer 100,000, age adjusted to the 1970 U.S. standard population.

cHispanic is not mutually exclusive from white, African-American, Asian American/ Pacific Islander, and Native American.

for both males and females based on data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program of the National Cancer Institute (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2000). Black males have the highest death rates for lung, colon, and prostate cancer; Black women have the highest death rates for colon and breast cancer. Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders have the lowest rates of breast and prostate cancer; Hispanics have the lowest rates of lung cancer. Several factors may contribute to these disparities, including health behaviors, access to and availability of prevention and treatment services, patterns of service utilization, environmental and occupational risks, community support and cohesion, differences in insurance coverage, and underlying biological risk factors.



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