B
Biographical Sketches

SUSAN C. SCRIMSHAW, PHD (Chair), is Dean of the School of Public Health and Professor of Community Health Sciences and Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Scrimshaw has extensive experience working with diverse populations in cross-cultural settings and in the fields of medical and applied anthropology, demography, culture change, and population health. An involved IOM member, Dr. Scrimshaw has served on the IOM Board on International Health and the IOM Panel on Cancer Research among Minorities and the Medically Underserved, among other IOM activities. She is a member of the Task Forces on Community Preventive Services and on Violence Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and a member of the Executive Council of the Illinois Department of Public Health. Dr. Scrimshaw has worked extensively with city, state, governmental, national, and United Nations agencies. She has been honored by the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Applied Anthropology with the Margaret Mead Award for “outstanding achievement in bringing anthropology to a wider audience (public health, demography, and the general public).”



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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations B Biographical Sketches SUSAN C. SCRIMSHAW, PHD (Chair), is Dean of the School of Public Health and Professor of Community Health Sciences and Anthropology at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Scrimshaw has extensive experience working with diverse populations in cross-cultural settings and in the fields of medical and applied anthropology, demography, culture change, and population health. An involved IOM member, Dr. Scrimshaw has served on the IOM Board on International Health and the IOM Panel on Cancer Research among Minorities and the Medically Underserved, among other IOM activities. She is a member of the Task Forces on Community Preventive Services and on Violence Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and a member of the Executive Council of the Illinois Department of Public Health. Dr. Scrimshaw has worked extensively with city, state, governmental, national, and United Nations agencies. She has been honored by the American Anthropological Association and the Society for Applied Anthropology with the Margaret Mead Award for “outstanding achievement in bringing anthropology to a wider audience (public health, demography, and the general public).”

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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations ALBERT BANDURA, PHD, is David Starr Jordan Professor of Social Sciences in Psychology at Stanford University. He is past president of the American Psychological Association, Western Psychological Association, and Honorary President of the Canadian Psychological Association. Throughout his career, Dr. Bandura has been honored with numerous honorary degrees and scientific awards, including the Distinguished Scientific Achievement Award from the American Psychological Association in 1972. He has served on the IOM Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health, as well as the IOM Committee on Preventing Nicotine Dependence in Children and Adolescents. Dr. Bandura was chair of the Board of Directors of both the American Psychological Association and the Western Psychological Association, and currently serves on the editorial boards of numerous psychological and behavioral journals, including the Psychological Review, Cognitive Therapy and Research, Media Psychology, Social Behavior and Personality, and British Journal of Clinical Psychology. MARTIN FISHBEIN, PHD, is Harry C. Coles Jr. Distinguished Professor in Communication at the Public Policy Center, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. He is past president of both the Society for Consumer Psychology and the Interamerican Psychological Society. Dr. Fishbein has served as guest researcher and acting chief of the Behavioral Intervention and Research Branch in the Division of STD Prevention at the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Currently, he serves on the editorial boards of various journals, including AIDS and Behavior; the Journal of Consumer Psychology; Psychology, Health and Medicine; and the Journal of Applied Social Psychology. LINDA C. GARRO, PHD, is Professor, Department of Anthropology, at the University of California at Los Angeles. Her work focuses on the following topics: the representation of cultural knowledge about illness; intracultural variation in such knowledge; how people make health care decisions; illness narratives and cultural

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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations knowledge; and remembering as a social, cultural, and cognitive process. Member of a number of Professional Societies, Dr. Garro has been elected to executive boards of the Society for Medical Anthropology and the Society for Psychological Anthropology. She has served on a number of editorial boards, including Culture, Medicine and Psychiatry and the book series for the Society for Psychological Anthropology. She has been a National Health Research Scholar in Canada and has received the Stirling Award for her contributions to psychological anthropology from the Society for Psychological Anthropology. ROBERT C. HORNIK, PHD, is Wilbur Schramm Professor of Communication and Health Policy at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania. He has a wide range of experience in public health communication evaluations, from AIDS education, and diarrhea treatment, immunization, and other child survival projects, to anti-drug and -domestic violence campaigns, at community, national, and international levels. He has won the Andreason Scholar award in social marketing, and the Fisher Mentorship award from the International Communication Association. Dr. Hornik has served as member of the IOM Committee on International Nutrition Programs, and as Consultant and Member of various Committees of the World Health Organization (WHO). He is scientific director for the evaluation of the National Youth Anti-drug Media Campaign. He is also consultant to other agencies such as the U.S. Agency for International Development, UNICEF, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Bank. Dr. Hornik serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including Social Marketing Quarterly. HOWARD LEVENTHAL, PHD, is Board of Governor’s Professor of Health Psychology at the Center for Research on Health and Behavior, and chair of the Division of Health at the Institute for Health, at Rutgers State University of New Jersey. Dr. Leventhal is a senior Member of the IOM and President of the APA, Division 38, which honored him with the Senior Investigator Award for

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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations Outstanding Contributions to Health Psychology in 1987. He is co-chair of the Behavioral Sciences Program at the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, and is actively involved in Governing and Consulting Committees, including the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute Committee on Adherence to Medical and Lifestyle Interventions. Dr. Leventhal is editor of the Journal of Health Psychology and co-editor of Psychology and Health, and he serves on the editorial boards of numerous journals of applied psychology and education. STEVEN R. LOPEZ, PHD, is professor in the Department of Psychology and Psychiatry, at the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Lopez has served as consultant to public mental health center staff, physicians, psychologists, and various clinical research and training units concerning the integration of cultural perspectives in training, research, and clinical practice. He is currently principal investigator of a project on Prosocial Family Factors, Culture, and Course of Schizophrenia, and was principal investigator and director of a research training program on Mental Disorders in Mexico. Dr. Lopez serves on the editorial boards of various psychological journals, such as Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, and recently served as one of the science editors for the Surgeon General’s Supplemental Report on Mental Health: Culture, Race, and Ethnicity. YOLANDA PARTIDA, MSW, MPA, is national program director for Hablamos Juntos, Improving patient-patient provider communication, an $18.5 million initiative to examine language barriers to health care for Latinos. Hablamos Juntos (We Speak Together) is funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and administered by Tomás Rivera Policy Institute based in the Claremont Graduate University. Dr. Partida has extensive experience in hospital and public health administration and in private consulting. In these settings she has been responsible for overseeing a variety of personal and public health programs, developing strategic plans,

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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations designing and conducting feasibility studies, and producing business case analyses, among other activities. She has worked with and on behalf of many different groups of underserved populations, including the uninsured, the U.S. Mexico border population, as well as the Latino community broadly and communities of other ethnic minority groups. Ms. Partida has served as Deputy Director of Health and Human Services, San Diego County HHSA, as Assistant Director of Ambulatory Care, Fresno County Health Services Agency and as senior manager with The Lewin Group, a private policy, research and management consulting firm. Dr. Partida is also the founder and executive director for The Partida Group, a health-focused research and management consulting firm specializing in diverse populations. BARBARA K. RIMER, MPH, DRPH, is director of Cancer Control and Population Sciences at the National Cancer Institute. Her expertise lies in health promotion and disease prevention, particularly of cancer, through behavioral research and intervention. Dr. Rimer was honored with the American Society for Preventive Oncology’s Distinguished Achievement Award and with the Mayhew Derryberry Award for her Contributions to Health Education Theory from the American Public Health Association. She has served on numerous advisory committees, including as chair of the National Cancer Advisory Board, and she currently serves on the Board of Directors of the American Family Life Assurance Corporation. Dr. Rimer is also is associate editor of Preventive Medicine, and serves on the editorial boards and as a reviewer of numerous medical and health education journals. Dr. Rimer is co-editor of one of the most widely-used textbooks for public health students: Health Education and Health Behavior: Theory, Research and Practice (with Drs. Karen Glanz and Francis Lewis). EVERETT M. ROGERS, PHD, is Regents’ Professor and Chair of the Department of Communication and Journalism at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Rogers’ expertise lies in applied communica-

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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations tion research, organizational aspects of health communication campaigns, intercultural communication, and agenda setting. His research examines HIV/AIDS prevention programs in San Francisco, the effects of an entertainment-education radio soap opera about HIV/AIDS prevention and family planning in Tanzania, and the effects of the Mothers Against Drunk Driver’s Victim Impact Panels on drunk drivers in New Mexico. Dr. Rogers was also co-principal investigator of the Stanford Heart Disease Prevention Program, and he currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Health Communication. GLORIAN SORENSEN, PHD, MPH, is Professor of Health and Social Behavior at the Harvard School of Public Health and Director of the Center for Community-Based Research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. The core of Dr. Sorensen’s research is randomized worksite- and community-based studies that test the effectiveness of theory-driven interventions targeting individual and organizational change. These interventions are designed particularly to be effective for low income, multiethnic populations, including blue-collar and service workers. These behavioral interventions are embedded in the social context or environments in which people live. Her research has focused on a range of community settings, including worksites and labor unions. Dr. Sorensen was a Member of the IOM Committee on Capitalizing on Social Sciences and Behavioral Research to Improve the Public’s Health, and now serves on the IOM Committee on the Health and Safety Needs of Older Workers. SHARYN MALLAMAD SUTTON, PHD, is president of Sutton Group and research professor at the School of Communication, American University. Dr. Sutton does innovative work in social marketing and effective consumer-based health communications, much of which has involved diverse or special populations. Dr. Sutton has acted as executive vice president of Research and Strategic Planning at Porter/Novelli, branch chief at the National Institutes of Health, directing the National Cancer Institute’s Public and Pa-

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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations tient Information Program, and director of Nutrition Marketing and Education for the U.S. Department of Agriculture. She has directed the research, strategic planning, and execution of award-winning public service campaigns such as “5 a Day for Better Health,” “Do the Right Thing,” “Mammography: Once a Year . . . for a Lifetime,” and “Team Nutrition,” which won the Silver Anvil Award of Excellence for “advancing public understanding of a social issue—child nutrition.” Dr. Sutton has served on a number of national advisory panels, including the Expert Panel on National Anti-Tobacco Public Education Campaign for the Campaign for Tobacco Free Kids. As president of Sutton Social Marketing, she provides social marketing expertise to non-profit and advocacy groups, foundations, and government agencies to create successful communication programs for behavior change, and currently serves on the editorial board of The Social Marketing Quarterly. LAWRENCE WALLACK, MS, MPH, DRPH, is director and professor at the School of Community Health at Portland State University and emeritus professor of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Wallack’s research has examined the presentation and policy implications of the framing of public health issues in the news and entertainment media. Most recently, he has explored the implications for public health communication strategies emerging from research linking social inequality, social capital, and health inequality. He was the principal investigator of the California site of the Community Intervention Trial for Smoking Cessation (COMMIT), and founding director of both the Prevention Research Center at the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (funded by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism) and the Berkeley Media Studies Group, Western Consortium for Public Health. Dr. Wallack has served as a consultant to numerous local, state, national, and international agencies, including the World Health Organization and the Office of Technology Assessment (U.S. Congress), among others, and has testified before the U.S. Senate and House on the regulation of alcohol advertising.

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Speaking of Health: Assessing Health Communication Strategies for Diverse Populations A. EUGENE WASHINGTON, MD, MPH, MSc, is professor of Gynecology, Epidemiology and Health Policy in the School of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He is chair of the Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, Director of the Medical Effectiveness Research Center for Diverse Populations at UCSF, and Director of the UCSF-Stanford Evidenced-based Practice Center. Dr. Washington has published extensively on topics in his major areas of research, which include effectiveness of reproductive health services, prevention of diseases in women, and explaining and eliminating racial/ethnic health disparities. He is the principal investigator of a program project on Promoting Effective Communication and Decision Making in Diverse Populations, funded by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and the National Cancer Institute. He has served as a member of many national and international advisory committees, including the Advisory Committee for the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Program, Department of Health and Human Services, and the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Clinical Research in the Public Interest. Currently, he serves on the Institutes of Medicine’s Committee on Identifying Priority Areas for Quality Improvement. KENNETH B. WELLS, MD, MPH [liaison], is professor-in-residence of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA Neuropsychiatric Institute and Hospital and Senior Scientist at RAND. He is a psychiatrist and health services researcher. Dr. Wells directs the UCLA-NPI Health Services Research Center, which focuses on improving quality of care for psychiatric and neurologic disorders across the lifespan. He is the principal investigator of the NIMH-funded UCLA/RAND Center for Research on Managed Care for Psychiatric Disorders; the Robert Wood Johnson-funded Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Supplement to the Community Tracking Study; and of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHQPR) Patient Outcomes Research Team (PORT-II). Dr. Wells is chair of the Institute of Medicine’s Neuroscience and Behavioral Health Board.

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