APPENDIX D
Related Reports from the National Academies

Adolescent Decision Making: Implications for Prevention Programs: Summary of a Workshop (1999)

Board on Children, Youth, and Families

Helping young people realize their potential often turns on their ability to make good decisions. To that end, the Forum on Adolescence convened a workshop that examined research on risk-taking and decision theory and the implications for programs to support healthy adolescent development. This workshop report highlights some of the factors that may influence how adolescents make decisions, including the role that emotions may play, the level of emotional maturity they have gained, and the way in which they think about their social world. Participants also looked at broader influences, such as the effect of the larger society and the media, and at programs for adolescents.

Adolescent Development and the Biology of Puberty: Summary of a Workshop on New Research (1999)

Forum on Adolescence

In one of its first activities, the Forum on Adolescence convened a workshop to explore new research on puberty and adolescent development. This workshop summary



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 335
Community Programs to Promote Youth Development APPENDIX D Related Reports from the National Academies Adolescent Decision Making: Implications for Prevention Programs: Summary of a Workshop (1999) Board on Children, Youth, and Families Helping young people realize their potential often turns on their ability to make good decisions. To that end, the Forum on Adolescence convened a workshop that examined research on risk-taking and decision theory and the implications for programs to support healthy adolescent development. This workshop report highlights some of the factors that may influence how adolescents make decisions, including the role that emotions may play, the level of emotional maturity they have gained, and the way in which they think about their social world. Participants also looked at broader influences, such as the effect of the larger society and the media, and at programs for adolescents. Adolescent Development and the Biology of Puberty: Summary of a Workshop on New Research (1999) Forum on Adolescence In one of its first activities, the Forum on Adolescence convened a workshop to explore new research on puberty and adolescent development. This workshop summary

OCR for page 335
Community Programs to Promote Youth Development report examines the discussion by participants representing diverse fields, from pediatric and adolescent medicine to neuroendocrinology to psychiatry and other disciplines. Reviewing breakthroughs in science and technology—especially brain imaging and neuroendocrinology—that have sparked an explosion of new knowledge, participants emphasized that available evidence underscores the dual influence of biological and social factors on development. The report emphasizes the importance of policies and programs that promote positive development, not just the absence of problems. Adolescents themselves need to be engaged as young adults who can learn to respond effectively to day-to-day challenges and serve as role models in encouraging positive behaviors. After-School Programs to Promote Child and Adolescent Development: Summary of a Workshop (2000) Committee on Community-Level Programs for Youth This volume summarizes the presentations and discussion at a workshop entitled Opportunities to Promote Child and Adolescent Development During the After-School Hours. The workshop was an effort to take stock of the current knowledge base on after-school programs and highlight key findings from recent research. This workshop summary report examines research on the developmental needs of children and adolescents—ages 5 to 14 years—and the types of after-school programs designed to promote the health and development of these young people. The Best Intentions: Unintended Pregnancy and the Well-Being of Children and Families (1995) Committee on Unintended Pregnancy The Best Intentions explores family planning issues shedding light on the questions and controversies surrounding unintended pregnancy. The book includes specific recommendations to put the United States on a par with other developed nations in terms of contraceptive attitudes and policies, and it considers the effectiveness of over 20 pregnancy prevention programs. The Best Intentions offers frank discussion, synthesis of data, and policy recommendations on one of today’s most sensitive social topics. Children of Immigrants: Health, Adjustment, and Public Assistance (1999) Committee on the Health and Adjustment of Immigrant Children and Families

OCR for page 335
Community Programs to Promote Youth Development Children of Immigrants represents some of the very best and most extensive research efforts to date on the circumstances, health, and development of children in immigrant families and the delivery of health and social services to these children and their families. This book presents detailed analyses of more than a dozen existing datasets that constitute a large share of the national system for monitoring the health and well-being of the U.S. population. The analyses enormously expand the available knowledge about the physical and mental health status and risk behaviors, educational experiences and outcomes, and socioeconomic and demographic circumstances of first- and second-generation immigrant children, compared with children with U.S.-born parents. From Generation to Generation: The Health and Well-Being of Children in Immigrant Families (1998) Committee on the Health and Adjustment of Immigrant Children and Families Immigrant children and youth are the fastest growing segment of the U.S. population, and so their prospects bear heavily on the well-being of the country. From Generation to Generation explores what is known about the development of white, black, Hispanic, and Asian children and youth from numerous countries of origin. Describing the status of immigrant children and youth as “severely understudied,” the committee both draws on and supplements existing research characterizing the current status and outlook of immigrants. The book discusses the many factors that shape the outlook for the lives of these children and youth and makes recommendations for improved research and data collection designed to advance knowledge about these children and, as a result, enhance their visibility in current policy debates. Growing Up Tobacco Free: Preventing Nicotine Addiction in Children and Youths (1994) Committee on Preventing Nicotine Addiction in Children and Youths Tobacco use kills more people than any other addiction and we know that addiction starts in childhood and youth. Growing Up Tobacco Free provides a readable explanation of nicotine’s effects and the process of addiction, documenting the search for an effective approach to preventing the use of cigarettes, chewing and spitting tobacco, and snuff by children and youths. It covers the results of recent initiatives to limit young people’s access to tobacco and discusses approaches to controls or bans on tobacco sales, price sensitivity among adolescents, and argu-

OCR for page 335
Community Programs to Promote Youth Development ments for and against taxation as a prevention strategy for tobacco use. The controversial area of tobacco advertising is thoroughly examined. How People Learn: Brain, Mind, Experience, and School: Expanded Edition (2000) Committee on Developments in the Science of Learning and the Committee on Learning Research and Educational Practice When do infants begin to learn? How do experts learn and how is this different from nonexperts? What can teachers and schools do—with curricula, classroom settings, and teaching methods—to help children learn most effectively? How People Learn examines new research about the mind and the brain that provides answers to these and other questions. New evidence from many branches of science has significantly added to the understanding of what it means to know, from the neural processes that occur during learning to the influence of culture on what people see and absorb. How People Learn examines these findings and their implications for what we teach, how we teach it, and how we assess what our children learn. The book uses exemplary teaching to illustrate how approaches based on what is now known result in in-depth learning. This new knowledge calls into question concepts and practices firmly entrenched in the current education system. Improving Intergroup Relations Among Youth: Summary of a Research Workshop (2000) Forum on Adolescence The study of interethnic and interracial interactions and relationships among youth, also called intergroup relations, has become a critical, complex, and challenging field in recent years. The Forum on Adolescence held a workshop to consider the findings of 16 research projects funded by the Carnegie Corporation of New York that have focused on intergroup relations. The goal of this workshop summary is to provide an opportunity to learn about the work and preliminary findings of the 16 projects, as well as to review the knowledge base regarding the effectiveness of interventions designed to promote peaceful, respectful relations among youths of different ethnic groups. Integrating Federal Statistics on Children: Report of a Workshop (1995) Committee on National Statistics and Board on Children and Families Those who make and implement policies for children and families are seriously hampered by several features of the federal statistical sys-

OCR for page 335
Community Programs to Promote Youth Development tem: categorical fragmentation, sampling strategies that follow adults and families rather than children, and lack of longitudinal data on children. This volume examines the adequacy of federal statistics on children and families. It includes papers on the relevant aspects of health care reform, family and community resources, interpersonal violence, the transition to school, and educational attainment and the transition to work. Longitudinal Surveys of Children (1998) Committee on National Statistics and Board on Children, Youth, and Families The Committee on National Statistics and the Board on Children, Youth, and Families convened a workshop to discuss ways to foster greater collaboration and sharing of information among principal investigators of several longitudinal surveys of children. Among many topics discussed were issues of coverage and balance of content, sampling design and weighting, measurement and analysis, field operations, legitimation and retention of cases, data disclosure and dissemination, and resources available for longitudinal studies. Losing Generations: Adolescents in High-Risk Settings (1995) Panel on High-Risk Youth This book argues that the problems of troubled youth cannot be separated from the settings in which they live—settings that have deteriorated significantly in the past two decades. The book examines what works and what does not in the effort to support and nurture adolescents and offers models for successful programs. It turns the spotlight on institutions that serve youth—the health care system, schools, the juvenile and criminal justice systems, and the child welfare and foster home systems—and how they are functioning. A number of difficult issues are addressed with research results and insightful analyses: access of poor youth to health insurance coverage, inequities in school funding, how child welfare agencies provide for adolescents in their care, and the high percentage of young black men in the criminal justice system. Protecting Youth at Work: Health, Safety, and Development of Working Children and Adolescents in the United States (1998) Committee on the Health and Safety Implications of Child Labor Protecting Youth at Work provides a historical perspective on working children and adolescents in America and explores the framework of

OCR for page 335
Community Programs to Promote Youth Development child labor laws that govern that work. The report presents a wide range of data and analysis on the scope of youth employment, factors that put children and adolescents at risk in the workplace, and the positive and negative effects of employment, including data on educational attainment and lifestyle choices. It also includes discussions of special issues for minority and disadvantaged youth, young workers in agriculture, and children who work in family-owned businesses. Risks and Opportunities: Synthesis of Studies on Adolescence (1999) Forum on Adolescence Over the past two decades, researchers have made substantial progress in describing the complexity of adolescence and in determining the common features of adolescent development. Research shows that adolescence is a time of both great turmoil and great opportunity for America’s youth. As one of the first activities of the Forum on Adolescence, Risks and Opportunities reviews and synthesizes nearly 60 reports published by the National Research Council and the Institute of Medicine regarding adolescent issues and topics relevant to their health and development. Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect (1993) Panel on Research on Child Abuse and Neglect Child abuse and neglect are in the forefront of public attention, yet without a conceptual framework, research in this area has been highly fragmented, and understanding the broad dimensions of this crisis has suffered as a result. This volume provides a comprehensive, integrated, child-oriented research agenda for the nation. Violence in Families: Assessing Prevention and Treatment Programs (1998) Committee on the Assessment of Family Violence Interventions Violence in Families examines the successes and failures of family violence interventions and makes recommendations to guide services, programs, policy, and research on victim support and assistance, treatments and penalties for offenders, and law enforcement. Included is an analysis of more than 100 evaluation studies on the outcomes of different kinds of programs and services. It explores the scope and complexity of family violence, including identification of the multiple types of victims and offenders, who require different approaches to intervention. The book outlines new strategies that offer promising approaches for

OCR for page 335
Community Programs to Promote Youth Development service providers and researchers and for improving the evaluation of prevention and treatment services. Youth Development and Neighborhood Influences: Challenges and Opportunities (1996) Committee on Youth Development Today’s youth live and develop in a society that offers tremendous choices and challenges during the formative period of adolescence. The adolescent’s environment is shaped profoundly by the presence or absence of many different factors, including family resources, community services, and educational and employment opportunities. This book examines the strengths and limitations of research on social settings and adolescence and identifies important research questions that deserve further study in developing this field. Also, it explores alternative methods by which the findings of research on social settings could be better integrated into the development of youth programs and services. Specific themes include the impact of social settings on differences in developmental pathways, role expectations, and youth identity and decision-making skills, as well as factors that contribute to variations in community context.