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TABLE S-6 Criteria and Dietary Reference Intake Values for Iron by Life Stage Group

Life Stage Group

Criterion

0 through 6 mo

Average iron intake from human milk

7 through 12 mo

Factorial modeling

1 through 3 y

Factorial modeling

4 through 8 y

Factorial modeling

9 through 13 y

Factorial modeling

14 through 18 y

Factorial modeling

19 through 30 y

Factorial modeling

31 through 50 y

Factorial modeling

51 through 70 y

Factorial modeling

> 70 y

Extrapolation of factorial analysis from 51 through 70 y

Pregnancy

 

14 through 18 y

Factorial modeling

19 through 50 y

Factorial modeling

Lactation

 

14 through 18 y

Adolescent female EAR minus menstrual losses plus average amount of iron secreted in human milk

19 through 50 y

Adult female EAR minus menstrual losses plus average amount of iron secreted in human milk

a EAR = Estimated Average Requirement. The intake that meets the estimated nutrient needs of half of the individuals in a group.

b RDA = Recommended Dietary Allowance. The intake that meets the nutrient need of almost all (97–98 percent) of individuals in a group.

c AI = Adequate Intake. The observed average or experimentally determined intake by a defined population or subgroup that appears to sustain a defined nutritional status, such as growth rate, normal circulating nutrient values, or other functional indicators of health. The AI is used if sufficient scientific evidence is not available to derive an EAR. For healthy infants receiving human milk, the AI is the mean intake. The AI is not equivalent to an RDA.

bility of adverse effects and will employ appropriate safety monitoring of trial subjects.

The ULs for vitamin A, boron, copper, iodine, iron, manganese, molybdenum, nickel, and zinc are based on adverse effects of intake from diet, fortified foods, and/or supplements. ULs could not be established for vitamin K, arsenic, chromium, and silicon because of lack of suitable data, a lack that indicates the need for additional research. The absence of data does not necessarily signify that people can tolerate chronic intakes of these substances at high levels, particularly elements such as arsenic which are known to cause serious adverse effects at very high levels of intake. Like all chemical agents, nutrients and other food components can produce adverse effects



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