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Reference

Study Group

Duration

Diet (mg/d)

Balance Data (mg/d)

Ivaturi and Kies, 1992

24 men and women

14 d

3.21

0.3

3.92

0.3

3.13

–0.2

2.64

0.23

3.13

0.51

3.15

0.32

Finley et al., 1994

20 men and 20 women, 18–40 y

14 d

5.43 (men)

0.27

4.01 (women)

–0.12

Hunt et al., 1998

21 women, 20–42 y

8 wk

2.5 (non-vegetarian)

0.1

5.9 (lacto-ovo-vegetarian)

0.6

Serum and Plasma Manganese Concentration

Several studies reported that serum or plasma manganese concentrations respond to dietary intake. Serum manganese concentration of women consuming 1.7 mg/day of manganese was lower than that of women ingesting 15 mg/day of supplemental manganese for more than 20 days (Davis and Greger, 1992). In a depletion trial (Freeland-Graves and Turnlund, 1996), plasma manganese concentration was 1.28 μg/L at baseline. Concentrations were significantly lower during the second (0.95 μg/L) and third (0.80 μg/L) dietary periods with manganese intakes of 2.06 and 1.21 mg/day, respectively. Values increased significantly to 1.11 ± 0.35 μg/L when the diet was repleted with 3.8 mg/day of manganese. During the final dietary periods, manganese intake was 2.65 mg/day, and plasma manganese concentration was 0.97 ± 0.33 μg/L. Plasma manganese concentration was not significantly correlated with manganese intake levels.

In a study in which 10 men consumed 0.52 to 5.33 mg/day of manganese, serum manganese concentration did not respond to varied dietary intakes (Greger et al., 1990). Individual serum manganese concentrations varied from 0.4 to 2.12 μg/L with an average of 1.04 μg/L. However, serum manganese concentrations of four of five subjects who consumed 15 mg of chelated manganese as a



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