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APPENDIX E

Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Jeremiah A. Barondess (Chair) is president of the New York Academy of Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has been involved in a number of National Academies activities, including the IOM Council (1978-1981) (member), the IOM Committee on Changing Health Care Systems and Rheumatic Disease (chair), the Council on Health Care Technology (vice chair), and the Committee to Plan a Private/ Public Sector Entity for Technology Assessment in Medical Care (chair). He has training as a generalist in internal medicine, measurement of quality in clinical care, and health policy, as well as in medical institute administration.

Mark R. Cullen is a professor of medicine and public health in the occupational and environmental medicine program at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has been involved in many National Academies activities, including his recent membership on the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries: The Research Base. He served on the Board on Health Sciences Policy and was vice chair of the Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. His areas of expertise are in environmental medicine/health and occupational medicine, and his interests include clinical aspects of occupational and environmental disease.

Barbara de Lateur is professor, director, and Lawrence Cardinal Shehan chair in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, and she is an expert in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Her clinical interests



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Page 465 APPENDIX E Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Jeremiah A. Barondess (Chair) is president of the New York Academy of Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has been involved in a number of National Academies activities, including the IOM Council (1978-1981) (member), the IOM Committee on Changing Health Care Systems and Rheumatic Disease (chair), the Council on Health Care Technology (vice chair), and the Committee to Plan a Private/ Public Sector Entity for Technology Assessment in Medical Care (chair). He has training as a generalist in internal medicine, measurement of quality in clinical care, and health policy, as well as in medical institute administration. Mark R. Cullen is a professor of medicine and public health in the occupational and environmental medicine program at the Yale University School of Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has been involved in many National Academies activities, including his recent membership on the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries: The Research Base. He served on the Board on Health Sciences Policy and was vice chair of the Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine. His areas of expertise are in environmental medicine/health and occupational medicine, and his interests include clinical aspects of occupational and environmental disease. Barbara de Lateur is professor, director, and Lawrence Cardinal Shehan chair in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Johns Hopkins University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, and she is an expert in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Her clinical interests

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Page 466include therapeutic exercise and the management of pain, and her research interests include the effects of exercise training on gait, balance, and fall risk in the elderly. Richard A. Deyo is a professor of medicine and professor of health services who is the section head of General Internal Medicine at the University of Washington Medical Center in Seattle. His research is in the area of low back pain, including the psychosocial predictors of disability. He is currently co-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Washington and principal investigator for the Back Pain Outcome Assessment Team, a multiyear project funded by the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. He has a long-standing research interest in the measurement of patient functional status and in the management of low back problems. Sue K. Donaldson is a professor of physiology and professor and dean of nursing in the School of Nursing at Johns Hopkins University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has been involved in many National Academies activities. She was a member of the IOM Committee on the NIH Research Priority-Setting Process, the Committee on Assessing Rehabilitation Science and Engineering, and the Committee on Enhancing Environmental Health Content in Nursing. Her areas of expertise are physiology and nursing, with interests in academic administration, biophysics, physiology, nursing, and aging. Colin G. Drury is professor of industrial engineering at the University at Buffalo and the founding executive director of the Center for Industrial Effectiveness. His work concentrates on the application of human factors to error and injury reduction in industrial process control, quality control, maintenance, and safety. Currently, he is principal investigator for studies of human reliability in aircraft inspection and maintenance. He is a member of the Committee on Human Factors, and also served as cochair of the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries: The Research Base. Michael Feuerstein is a professor of Medical/Clinical Psychology and Preventive Medicine/Biometrics at the Uniformed Services University in Bethesda, Maryland. He is also a clinical professor of psychiatry in the Division of Behavioral Medicine at Georgetown University Medical Center. His clinical, research, and consultative activities are directed at the explication of the multidimensional nature of occupational musculoskeletal disorders and disability (with a focus on ergonomic and psychosocial factors) and the development and evaluation of integrated prevention and management strategies.

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Page 467 Baruch Fischhoff is university professor of social and decision sciences and of engineering and public policy in the Department of Social and Decision Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University. His expertise is in the areas of social sciences and psychology, and his research is in judgment and decision making, risk perception, risk management, risk communication, informed consent, science policy, and decision procedures and theory. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was a member of the NRC's Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. He was a member of the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries: The Research Base. John W. Frymoyer is the dean (retired) of the College of Medicine, emeritus professor in the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, and former director of the McClure Musculoskeletal Research Center at the University of Vermont. The McClure Center performs research in the areas of low back pain, sports medicine, scoliosis, and joint replacement. He is the editor of the two-volume The Adult Spine and founding editor of the Journal of the American Academy of Orothopaedic Surgeons. Jeffrey N. Katz is associate professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and a practicing rheumatologist and co-director of the Spine Center at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He has performed research on clinical, epidemiologic, and health services delivery aspects of carpal tunnel syndrome and other upper extremity disorders, lumbar spinal stenosis and other spinal conditions, and total joint arthroplasty. Kurt Kroenke is a medical doctor at Regenstrief Institute for Health Care in Indianapolis and a professor of medicine at the Indiana University School of Medicine. His clinical research has focused on the optimal evaluation and management of common symptoms, such as fatigue, dizziness, and other physical complaints. He conducts research on depression and other mental disorders in primary care. Jeffrey C. Lotz is the director of the University of California at San Francisco Orthopaedic Bioengineering Laboratory. The laboratory is within the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and devoted to conducting basic research in several areas of orthopaedics, including the biomechanics of the spine, intervertebral disc, and the hand. He is an expert in medical engineering and has received awards in the areas of low back pain research and spinal research. Susan E. Mackinnon is chief, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, and Shoenberg professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery at the

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Page 468Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Her research interests and expertise are in carpal tunnel syndrome, brachial plexus, cumulative trauma disorder, facial palsy, hand and upper extremity disorders and injury, peripheral nerve, and thoracic outlet syndrome. She has focused on peripheral nerve regeneration, and she performed the world's first successful nerve allograft transplantation. Frederick J. Manning is a senior program officer in the Institute of Medicine's Division of Health Sciences Policy Division and study director. In six years at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), he has served as study director for projects addressing a variety of topics, including medical isotopes, potential hepatitis drugs, blood safety and availability, rheumatic disease, resource sharing in biomedical research, and chemical and biological terrorism. Before joining the IOM, he spent 25 years in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command, serving in positions that included director of neuropsychiatry at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and chief research psychologist for the Army Medical Department. William S. Marras is a professor of industrial and systems engineering at the Ohio State University. He is the director of the university's Biodynamics Laboratory and co-director of the Institute for Ergonomics. He also is the recipient of the Honda Endowed Chair in Transportation Research. He holds academic appointment in the Department of Industrial, Welding, and Systems Engineering, the Department of Physical Medicine, and the Biomedical Engineering Center. His research involves industrial biomechanics issues, laboratory biomechanics studies, mathematical modeling, and clinical studies of the back and wrist. He was a member of the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries: The Research Base and is currently a member of the Committee on Human Factors. Anne S. Mavor is the study director for the Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders and the Workplace. She is also currently the staff director for the Committee on Human Factors and the Committee on the Youth Population and Military Recruitment. Her previous work as an NRC senior staff officer has included studies on occupational analysis and the enhancement of human performance, modeling human behavior and command decision making, human factors in air traffic control automation, human factors considerations in tactical display for soldiers, scientific and technological challenges of virtual reality, emerging needs and opportunities for human factors research, and modeling cost and performance for purposes of military enlistment. For the past 25 years, her work has concentrated on human factors, cognitive psychology, and information system design.

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Page 469 James P. McGee is the senior research associate for the Panel on Musculoskeletal Disorders in the Workplace. He also supports NRC panels and committees in the areas of applied psychology (e.g., the ongoing panel on soldier systems; and prior committees on air traffic control automation and on the changing nature of work) and education (e.g., the committee on educational interventions for children with autism). Prior to joining the NRC, he held scientific, technical, and management positions in human factors psychology at IBM, RCA, General Electric, General Dynamics, and United Technologies corporations. Andrew M. Pope is director of the Division of Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine and served as study director for the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Policy study. With expertise in physiology, toxicology, and epidemiology, his primary interests focus on environmental and occupational influences on human health. Dr. Pope's previous research activities focused on the biochemical, neuroendocrine, and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed and edited numerous reports on environmental and occupational issues; topics include injury control, disability prevention, biological markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the inclusion of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. Most recently, Dr. Pope directed the fast-track study on NIH priority-setting processes, and a review of fluid resuscitation practices in combat casualties. Robert G. Radwin is a professor and chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His fields of interest include analytical methods for measuring and assessing exposure to physical stress in the workplace; ergonomics aspects of manually operated equipment and human-computer input devices; causes and prevention of work-related cumulative trauma disorders and peripheral neuropathies; occupational biomechanics; and rehabilitation engineering and was just appointed a member of the Committee on Human Factors. David Rempel is a professor of medicine in the Division of Occupational and Environmental Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and holds joint appointments in the Departments of Mechanical Engineering and Bioengineering at the University of California at Berkeley. He is director of the ergonomics program at Berkeley. He is board certified in internal medicine, preventive medicine (occupational medicine), and ergonomics. His research interests include understanding

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Page 470mechanisms of upper extremity tendon, nerve, and muscle injury and repair associated with repeated loading, occupational biomechanics, musculoskeletal disorder epidemiology, and hand tool design. Robert M. Szabo is chief, Hand and Microvascular Service, Department of Orthopaedics; professor, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery; and professor, Department of Surgery, Division of Plastic Surgery, at the University of California at Davis. His current research interests include nerve compression lesions, nerve repair and regeneration biology, tendon healing and adhesion formation, and the epidemiology of repetitive trauma and injury prevention. He specializes in complex hand, upper extremity, and shoulder reconstructions after tumor resections, as well as soft tissue and bone transfers to the lower extremities. David Vlahov is director of the Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies at the New York Academy of Medicine. He is on a leave of absence from Johns Hopkins University, where he is professor and deputy chairman in the Department of Epidemiology. He has coordinated several large clinical epidemiologic studies of HIV infection among drug users (e.g., the ALIVE study) and is the principal evaluator of the Washington, D.C., and Baltimore needle exchange programs. He has a particular interest in research methods in field settings. He was a member of the NRC Steering Committee for the Workshop on Work-Related Musculoskeletal Injuries: The Research Base. David H. Wegman is the founding chair of the Department of Work Environment in the Engineering College at the University of Massachusetts, Lowell, now one of the leading preventive medicine (occupational medicine) research centers. His research has focused on epidemiologic studies of occupational respiratory disease, musculoskeletal disorders, and cancer. A continuing research interest has been in developing methods to study subjective outcomes, such as musculoskeletal and respiratory or irritant symptoms reports. Alexandra K. Wigdor is deputy director of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (CBASSE) and formerly director of the Division on Education, Labor, and Human Performance. A member of the National Research Council research staff since 1978, she has been instrumental in developing the education and behavioral science program in CBASSE.