H
Committee Biographies

WALTER HIERHOLZER, M.D. (Chair), is Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases, and Epidemiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. He was also Director of the Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Co-director of the Department of Quality Improvement Support Services at Yale New Haven Hospital until his retirement from that institution in January 2000. From 1976 to 1985, he was the Director of the Program of Hospital Epidemiology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where he founded and was responsible for the Iowa Statewide Epidemiology Education and Consultation Program serving over 100 hospitals. He is the former Chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, former Chair of the American Hospital Association Technical Panel on Infections within Hospitals, Past President of the Society of Healthcare Epidemiologists for America, and a member of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations Infection Control Indicators Task Force and the (Computer) Information Management Task Force.

SCOTT BARNHART, M.D., is Medical Director, Harborview Medical Center, and Associate Dean, University of Washington School of Medicine. He is past director of the University’s Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program and is certified in pulmonology and occupational medicine. Dr. Barnhart has 18 years of experience in the area of clinical pulmonary and occupational medicine. He has conducted research on the structure, function, and financing of occupa-



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Tuberculosis in the Workplace H Committee Biographies WALTER HIERHOLZER, M.D. (Chair), is Professor Emeritus of Internal Medicine, Infectious Diseases, and Epidemiology at the Yale University School of Medicine. He was also Director of the Department of Hospital Epidemiology and Co-director of the Department of Quality Improvement Support Services at Yale New Haven Hospital until his retirement from that institution in January 2000. From 1976 to 1985, he was the Director of the Program of Hospital Epidemiology at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, where he founded and was responsible for the Iowa Statewide Epidemiology Education and Consultation Program serving over 100 hospitals. He is the former Chair of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Hospital Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, former Chair of the American Hospital Association Technical Panel on Infections within Hospitals, Past President of the Society of Healthcare Epidemiologists for America, and a member of the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations Infection Control Indicators Task Force and the (Computer) Information Management Task Force. SCOTT BARNHART, M.D., is Medical Director, Harborview Medical Center, and Associate Dean, University of Washington School of Medicine. He is past director of the University’s Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program and is certified in pulmonology and occupational medicine. Dr. Barnhart has 18 years of experience in the area of clinical pulmonary and occupational medicine. He has conducted research on the structure, function, and financing of occupa-

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Tuberculosis in the Workplace tional health systems in the United States and Southeast Asia. His publications include work in the areas of risk assessment for intrainstitutional spread of tuberculosis, benefits of engineering controls and respiratory protection, and clearance of worker populations for use of respirators. HENRY M.BLUMBERG, M.D., is Associate Professor, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, at Emory University School of Medicine in Atlanta. He also serves as Hospital Epidemiologist at Grady Memorial Hospital, which is a major teaching affiliate of Emory. Dr. Blumberg has been on the Emory faculty and at Grady Hospital for the past 8 years. He is board certified in internal medicine and infectious diseases by the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is a recipient of a National Institutes of Health Tuberculosis Academic Award (1993–2001) and has played a central role in tuberculosis-related education at Emory University. He has published widely on the efficacy of tuberculosis infection control measures implemented at Grady Memorial Hospital, a 1,000-bed inner-city hospital which has cared for about 200 new tuberculosis patients per year over the past decade. He has also served as principal investigator for a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Tuberculosis Demonstration Project in Atlanta, the Atlanta TB Prevention Coalition, which involves collaboration among a variety of major groups including public health, academic, private, and community-based organizations involved in tuberculosis education, management, and control in Atlanta. SCOTT BURRIS, J.D., is on the faculty of Temple University School of Law, Philadelphia, where he has been since 1991. Formerly an attorney at the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania, he has also served as law clerk to Judge (now Chief Judge) Dolores Sloviter of the Third Circuit United States Court of Appeals. He is a graduate of the Yale Law School. Professor Burris is the editor of AIDS Law Today: A New Guide for the Public (1993), and the author or co-author of articles on the law and public health including The Law and the Public’s Health: A Study of Infectious Disease Law in the United States, 99 Columbia L. Rev. 59 (1999). He serves on numerous advisory committees on matters relating to the intersection of public health and law. ROBYN GERSHON, Dr.P.H., is Assistant Professor at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, in the Division of Sociomedical Sciences. She recently served as Associate Scientist in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences at The Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. She has a doc-

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Tuberculosis in the Workplace torate in public health from Johns Hopkins University. She has conducted several research studies involving tuberculosis risk in both hospital-based and non-hospital-based health care workers, including funeral directors, emergency service employees, and most recently, correctional health care workers. She has special expertise in the area of tuberculin skin testing as well as in risk reduction methodologies, including a wide range of control measures (e.g., engineering, administrative, and work practice controls). Dr. Gershon is also a clinical microbiologist, with a master’s in medical microbiology. DOUGLAS HORNICK, M.D., is Associate Professor, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care, and Occupational Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa. He is board certified in internal medicine, with subspecialty board certification in both pulmonary and critical care medicine. His clinical and research interests focus on lung infections. He is director of the tuberculosis Chest Clinic as well as the adult Cystic Fibrosis Service at the University of Iowa. He serves as an advisor to the State Department of Health for tuberculosis-related issues and is the author of several review articles, web pages, and textbook chapters on tuberculosis. He has also served on the international consensus committee on nosocomial pneumonia, and the Microbiology, Tuberculosis and Pulmonary Infection Program committee for the American Thoracic Society. PAMELA KELLNER, R.N., M.P.H., is the Director of the Program Development Unit for the New York City Department of Health Tuberculosis Control Program. She has also served as Deputy Director for Outreach Services, planning and providing administrative oversight for regulatory affairs, directly observed therapy, homeless services, and screening activities related to tuberculosis outbreaks and exposure incidents within large groups and special populations. She has worked as an employee health services administrator and has directed an on-site mental health program in a large urban homeless shelter. JAMES MELIUS, M.D., Dr.P.H., is Director of the New York State Laborers’ Health and Safety Trust Fund and Director of Research for the Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America. His work focuses on the development and promotion of health and safety programs in the construction industry. He is currently Chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registries, a member of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, and a past member of the Advisory Committee for the Elimination of Tuberculo-

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Tuberculosis in the Workplace sis for the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention. He worked for the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health from 1980 to 1987, where he directed its main workplace consultation program. From 1987 to 1994, he worked for the New York State Department of Health where he directed environmental and occupational health programs including the development of a network of occupational health clinics. STEPHEN G.PAUKER, M.D., is Vice Chairman for Clinical Affairs, Department of Medicine, and Associate Physician-in-Chief, New England Medical Center, and Sara Murray Jordan Professor of Medicine, Tufts University. Dr. Pauker is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM). Prior committee memberships have included IOM’s Guidelines on Thyroid Cancer Screening, and the Committee to Evaluate the Artificial Heart Program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, as well as Workshops on the National Institutes of Health Consensus Development Process and the Use of Drugs in the Elderly, both within IOM. His publications and research have focused on screening for cancer and other conditions, applications of clinical decision theory and medical informatics to health policy, technology assessment and the individualization of patient care, cost-effectiveness analysis, clinical cardiology, telemedicine, ethics of various reimbursement models, and efficiency of care delivery. ROBERT C.SPEAR, Ph.D., is a Professor of Environmental Health Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley. He received an M.S. in mechanical engineering in 1963 from the University of California, Berkeley, and a Ph.D. in control engineering from Cambridge University in Cambridge, England, 5 years later. Dr. Spear’s research interests relate principally to the assessment and control of exposures to hazardous agents in both the occupational and community environments. He has an extensive publication record in this field which spans farmworkers’ exposures to pesticides to strategies for the characterization and control of the exposure of rural populations to parasites in the developing world. He was appointed Founding Director of the University of California’s Center for Occupational and Environmental Health in 1979 and continues to serve in that capacity. He has served on numerous committees advisory to governmental agencies including the National Advisory Committee on Occupational Safety and Health and, currently, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Board of Scientific Counselors. LESTER N.WRIGHT, M.D., M.P.H., is Deputy Commissioner/Chief Medical Officer responsible for provision of health care to 72,000 in-

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Tuberculosis in the Workplace mates in New York State prisons. He has dealt with tuberculosis in primary care in Ethiopia, as tuberculosis control officer for a county public health agency, as a state health officer, and in his current corrections health position in a large state prison system where a multiple drug-resistant tuberculosis outbreak was first identified and the rate of new cases of tuberculosis disease has decreased 83 percent since the peak in 1991. He is certified by the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Wright spent 7 years working in various parts of Africa including delivery of primary health care and health system development and supervision. He continues to do international consultation in areas such as child survival and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus infection.