Appendix I: Biographical Information

Richard Askey is a member of the Program Steering Committee (PSC) and is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1961 and his M.A. from Harvard University in 1956. From 1958 to present, Askey has held various academic positions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Chicago, and Washington University. His specialty is special functions. Askey is an Honorary Fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He currently serves on the National Research Council's (NRC) Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB).

Deborah Loewenberg Ball is chair of the PSC and is Professor of Educational Studies at the University of Michigan. Her work as a researcher and teacher educator draws directly and indirectly on her long experience as an elementary classroom teacher. With mathematics as the main context for her work, Ball studies the practice of teaching and the processes of learning to teach. Her work examines efforts to improve teaching through policy, reform initiatives, and teacher education. Ball's publications include articles on teacher learning and teacher education; the role of subject matter knowledge in teaching and learning to teach; endemic challenges of teaching; and the relations of policy and practice in instructional reform. Ball was the Coordinator for the Professional Development Action Conference held in conjunction with the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education's (CSMEE) National Convocation on Mathematics Education in the Middle Grades. She is currently a member of the NRC's MSEB and Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education.

Carne Barnett is currently Director of the Mathematics Case Methods Project at WestEd in Oakland, California. She also has prior experience as a teacher in urban settings and as a teacher educator at the University of California, Berkeley, where her pioneering work with cases for teaching mathematics began in 1987. Her research focuses on the characterization and growth of mathematics teachers' pedagogical content knowledge, as well as on methods for using cases as a professional development tool. She has published



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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching Appendix I: Biographical Information Richard Askey is a member of the Program Steering Committee (PSC) and is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1961 and his M.A. from Harvard University in 1956. From 1958 to present, Askey has held various academic positions at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of Chicago, and Washington University. His specialty is special functions. Askey is an Honorary Fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore, and Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He currently serves on the National Research Council's (NRC) Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB). Deborah Loewenberg Ball is chair of the PSC and is Professor of Educational Studies at the University of Michigan. Her work as a researcher and teacher educator draws directly and indirectly on her long experience as an elementary classroom teacher. With mathematics as the main context for her work, Ball studies the practice of teaching and the processes of learning to teach. Her work examines efforts to improve teaching through policy, reform initiatives, and teacher education. Ball's publications include articles on teacher learning and teacher education; the role of subject matter knowledge in teaching and learning to teach; endemic challenges of teaching; and the relations of policy and practice in instructional reform. Ball was the Coordinator for the Professional Development Action Conference held in conjunction with the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education's (CSMEE) National Convocation on Mathematics Education in the Middle Grades. She is currently a member of the NRC's MSEB and Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education. Carne Barnett is currently Director of the Mathematics Case Methods Project at WestEd in Oakland, California. She also has prior experience as a teacher in urban settings and as a teacher educator at the University of California, Berkeley, where her pioneering work with cases for teaching mathematics began in 1987. Her research focuses on the characterization and growth of mathematics teachers' pedagogical content knowledge, as well as on methods for using cases as a professional development tool. She has published

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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching journal articles and book chapters in the Journal of Teacher Education, Teaching and Teacher Education, the Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education, The Case for Education, and Mathematics Teachers in Transition. Barnett is the principal investigator of a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant whose central aim is to equip teachers with a stronger and more complex content knowledge base. She is also the principal investigator of a project to develop materials for students and support materials for teachers to improve students' understanding of rational number concepts Hyman Bass is a member of the PSC and Professor of Mathematics at Columbia University, New York. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Chicago in 1959. He has since been a member of Columbia University's Mathematics Department, which he chaired from 1975-1979. As an academic mathematician, Bass is involved in basic research, mainly in algebra and its interface with geometry, and teaching at all university levels. He is currently also engaged in education research in collaboration with Deborah Ball at the University of Michigan. He is an author of research and expository writings, active in the editorial aspects of scientific publishing, and engages in matters of educational and scientific policy. Bass has served as a member of or consultant to numerous national and international groups concerned with mathematical research and science. He has been a trustee of the AMS (of which he chairs its Committee on Education), of the Berkeley Mathematical Sciences Research Institute (as its initial Board Chair), and of the Institute for Advanced Study. He is currently a member of the National Academy of Sciences [where he chairs the Mathematical Sciences Education Board (MSEB) and has been a member of the Board on Mathematical Sciences], and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is President of the International Commission on Mathematics Instruction. Virginia Bastable has been the director of the SummerMath for Teachers Program at Mount Holyoke College since 1993. Prior to that, over the course of a twenty-five-year career as a secondary school mathematics teacher, she earned a Masters in mathematics and an Ed.D. in mathematics education. Bastable has been working in the field of teacher education, designing and conducting summer institutes and academic year courses in both mathematics and mathematics education for teachers of grades K-12. She is currently working in collaboration with EDC, Inc., in Newton and TERC in Cambridge to create a professional development curriculum designed to allow teachers to engage with the mathematical ideas of the elementary curriculum and to examine the way students develop those ideas. This curriculum, Developing Mathematical Ideas, is published by Dale Seymour. Gail Burrill earned an undergraduate degree in mathematics at Marquette University and her Masters in mathematics at Loyola University of Chicago. She was a secondary teacher and department chair in suburban Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for over twenty-five years and recently an associate researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is currently at the National Research Council where she serves as program officer for the Mathematical Sciences Education Board. She is the immediate Past President of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics. As an instructor for Teachers

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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching Teaching with Technology, she conducts workshops around the country on using technology in the classroom. Her honors include the Presidential Award for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and the Wisconsin Distinguished Educator Award. She was elected a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She is on the Advisory Board of the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. The author of numerous books and articles on statistics and mathematics education, she has spoken nationally and internationally on issues in mathematics education. Rodger W. Bybee is Executive Director of the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education (CSMEE) at the National Research Council, Washington, D.C. Between 1992 and 1995, he participated in the development of the National Science Education Standards, and from 1993-1995 chaired the content working group of that project. Prior to this appointment, he served as associate director of the Biological Sciences Curriculum Study (BSCS). Bybee was principal investigator for several NSF programs including an elementary school program entitled Science for Life and Living, a middle school program entitled Middle School Science and Technology, a high school program entitled Biological Sciences: A Human Approach, and the college program, Biological Perspectives. His work at BSCS also has included serving as principal investigator for programs to develop curriculum frameworks for teaching about the history and nature of science and technology and for biology education at high schools, community colleges, and four-year colleges. From 1972-1985, Bybee was Professor of Education at Carleton College in Northfield, Minnesota. He received his Ph.D. in science education and psychology from New York University. His B.A. and M.A. are from the University of Northern Colorado with majors in both biology and fine arts and a minor in earth science. He has taught science at the elementary, junior and senior high school, and college levels. Bybee has been active in education for more than thirty years. Throughout his career, Bybee has written widely, publishing in both education and psychology. He is co-author of a leading textbook entitled Teaching Secondary School Science: Strategies for Developing Scientific Literacy. His most recent book is Achieving Scientific Literacy: From Purposes to Practices. Over the years, he has received awards for Leader of American Education and Outstanding Educator in America, and in 1979 was Outstanding Science Educator of the year. In 1989, he was recognized as one of the 100 outstanding alumni in the history of the University of Northern Colorado. Bybee's biography has been included in the Golden Anniversary 50th Edition of Who's Who in America. Michaele F. Chappell is an Associate Professor of Mathematics Education in the Department of Secondary Education at the University of South Florida, Tampa, where she teaches methods courses for elementary, middle grades, and secondary preservice students, and graduate mathematics education courses related to trends in research and the practice of education. Chappell has worked on a number of mathematics education projects, including as an investigative researcher for the QUASAR Project. Chappell has been active in national, state, and local mathematics education organizations such as the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), the Association of Mathematics Teacher

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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching Education, and the Benjamin Banneker Association; she has served in the role of board/committee member and officer in several of these organizations. During the past eighteen years, she has demonstrated her breadth of knowledge in mathematics teaching and learning through her teaching and presentations. She has been an invited speaker at conferences and has provided numerous teachers with professional development workshops. Joan Ferrini-Mundy is Associate Executive Director of the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education and Director, Mathematical Sciences Education Board, at the National Research Council. She is on leave from her position as a professor of mathematics at the University of New Hampshire, where she joined the faculty in 1983. She holds a Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of New Hampshire. FerriniMundy taught mathematics at Mount Holyoke College in 1982-1983, where she co-founded the SummerMath for Teachers program. She was the Principal Investigator for NCTM's Recognizing and Recording Reform in Mathematics Education (R3M) project. She served as a visiting scientist at the National Science Foundation 1989-1991. She chaired the NCTM's Research Advisory Committee, was a member of the NCTM Board of Directors, and served on the NRC 's MSEB. FerriniMundy has chaired the Association for Educational Research (AERA) Special Interest Group for Research in Mathematics Education. Her research interests are in calculus learning and reform in mathematics education, K-14. Currently she chairs the Writing Group for Standards 2000, the revision of the NCTM Standards. Bradford Findell is a Program Officer in the Center for Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Education at the National Research Council, where most of his work is with the Mathematical Sciences Education Board. He holds a Master's degree in mathematics from Boston University and is completing a doctorate in mathematics education at the University of New Hampshire under Joan Ferrini-Mundy. His primary interests are in the teaching and learning of high school and undergraduate mathematics and in the preparation and professional development of mathematics teachers. Alice Gill is currently Associate Director, Educational Issues Department of the American Federation of Teachers; she was an elementary teacher in the Cleveland public schools for twenty-four years. She coordinates Thinking Mathematics, a research-based professional development program for elementary/ middle school teachers that she helped to develop during an NSF-funded collaboration between AFT and the University of Pittsburgh. This is part of the union's Educational Research and Dissemination Program. She also works on professional development and standards issues. Gill was a member of the advisory group for the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) Classroom Videotape Study report, advised on the Department of Education's Attaining Excellence TIMSS toolkit, and developed AFT's materials on TIMSS. She is a member of NCTM's External Relations Committee and on the Expert Panel for development of the Internet Learning Network that will be devoted to math and science. Cathy Kessel is an independent scholar. She received her Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Colorado at Boulder and has taught

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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching mathematics at Ohio State University, the College of Charleston, Vista Community College, Kaiser Hospital, and Mills College. She has worked as a researcher in mathematics education at the University of California and the University of Melbourne, as a textbook editor and researcher at Key Curriculum Press, as an assessment developer for New Standards, as an editor for Liping Ma's Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics, as a curriculum developer at the University of California, and as an additional writer on the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics. Currently she serves on the Math/Science Network's advisory board. Genevieve Knight is a member of the PSC and Professor of Mathematics at Coppin State College in Baltimore, Maryland. Knight has been a member of the Board of Directors of NCTM and Governor at Large for the Mathematical Association of America (MAA). She has served on commissions and committees for NCTM, the American Association of Colleges of Teachers of Education (AACTE), the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE), and is currently a member of the Department of Education 's Expert Panel on Science and Mathematics Education. Her work on behalf of equity issues as well as her interest in improving mathematics education have involved her in a variety of projects including the MSEB's Making Mathematics Work for Minorities project. Preparing aspiring future teachers to teach school mathematics; teaching mathematics majors the language of mathematics; and exploring how students learn, understand, and achieve are her primary interests. Knight received her Ph.D. from the University of Maryland. Shin-ying Lee is an Associate Research Scientist at the Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Michigan. She is a developmental and educational psychologist. Her research focuses on the cross-national comparative studies of children's academic achievement, particularly mathematics achievement, and the contexts that relate to the attainment of academic achievement. This involves the comparison of the learning experience of students from Japan, Taiwan, China, and the United States. In her research, teacher interviews, classroom observations, testing of students, and analyses of curricular materials have been used to understand the mathematics teaching and learning processes. Lee is also developing a mathematics curriculum, M-Math, and works with teachers in elementary schools to initiate aspects of effective mathematics instructions based on their findings from the comparative research. Jill Lester, currently the Assistant Director of the SummerMath for Teachers program at Mount Holyoke College, became a teacher-educator after many years working as an elementary school teacher. Ms. Lester has a B.S. in elementary education with a minor in psychology from Rhode Island College, an M.S. in elementary education from Southern Connecticut State University, and is enrolled as a doctoral student at the University of Massachusetts. In recent years, she has been working with both inservice and preservice teachers in the development and implementation of the Developing Mathematical Ideas Curriculum. James Lewis is Professor and Chair of the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. In 1998 his department won the

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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching University of Nebraska's University-wide Department Teaching Award as the outstanding teaching department in the four-campus university system. His department also won a 1998 Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring. He was a principal investigator for the Nebraska Math and Science Initiative, Nebraska's NSF-funded SSI. He is a past chair of the American Mathematical Society's (AMS) Committee on Science Policy and currently serves on the AMS Committee on Education. He is chair of the Steering Committee for the Conference Board for the Mathematical Sciences (CBMS) Mathematics Education of Teachers Project and is co-chair of the NRC's Committee on the Preparation of Science and Mathematics Teachers. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Louisiana State University. James Lightbourne is a Science Advisor in the National Science Foundation's Division of Undergraduate Education. Prior to his work at NSF, he was Chair of the Mathematics Department at West Virginia University. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from North Carolina State University in 1976. Liping Ma is an independent scholar. Her teaching career started when, as a teenager in rural China, she was asked to teach elementary school. During her seven years as an elementary teacher she taught all five grades of elementary school. Later she became the principal of the school, then the superintendent of the county in which the school was located. She received a Masters degree in education from East China Normal University and became an assistant research professor at Shanghai Research Institution for Higher Education. Her continued interest in education led her to graduate study at Michigan State University where she worked as a graduate assistant on the study that inspired her dissertation. She received her Ph.D. in curriculum and teacher education from Stanford University. As a McDonnell post-doctoral fellow at the University of California at Berkeley she revised her Ph.D. dissertation into the book Knowing and Teaching Elementary Mathematics: Teachers' Understanding of Fundamental Mathematics in China and the United States. Carole Midgett is a National Board Certified Teacher who has taught first through eighth grades for nineteen years. She received her B.A. at Barton College (formerly Atlantic Christian College) and has done graduate studies at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. Midgett holds certifications in gifted education and mentoring for preservice and novice teachers. She is a trainer of assessors for Performance Based Licensure in North Carolina. She is a Presidential Awardee in Elementary Mathematics. She has authored and co-authored articles in juried mathematics and research journals. Additionally, she has contributed to numerous publications on assessment, process writing, cognitive coaching, professional development, and Addison Wesley texts. Her presentations include state, regional, national, and international conferences. She served on the NCTM Assessment Addenda Writing Team and participated in the NCTM project to implement the geometry standards. She has served on state curriculum development projects and organized, coordinated, and directed numerous teacher enhancement projects in both mathematics and science. Currently, she serves on the Implementation Team of the Professional Development System at the UNC at Wilmington.

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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching Marco Ramirez is an Assistant Principal at an elementary school. He received his B.S. in business and agriculture and his M.A. at the University of Arizona in 1983 and 1997. From 1987 to present, Ramirez has served on various committees for the NCTM, NSF, and NRC. Ramirez worked for Tucson Unified School District Title I / EXXON Mathematics Project conducting staff development for teachers before becoming an Assistant Principal. Mark Saul is a member of the PSC and a teacher at Bronxville High School in Bronxville, New York. He has taught for over thirty years on the pre-college level, and has served as an adjunct professor for the City University of New York. He is also Director of the American Regions Mathematics League Russian Exchange Program. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics education from New York University in 1987. He was awarded the Sigma Xi Recognition for Outstanding High School Science Teacher, Lehman College Chapter, in 1981 and received the Westinghouse Science Talent Search Certificates of Honor, 1980-1983. He was recognized with the Presidential Award for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics of the National Science Foundation in 1984. He received the Admiral Hyman L. Rickover Foundation Fellowship in 1985, was a Tandy Scholar in 1994, and received the Gabriella and Paul Rosenbaum Foundation Fellowship in 1995. He became a Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), in 1997. He has extensive experience as a judge of mathematical competitions and with Russian mathematics education. He is a member of AMS and is active in the mathematics teaching standards revision. He has been continuously active in professional workshops, activities, and presentations, and has authored over twenty publications. He is currently a member of the NRC's MSEB and the Committee on Science and Mathematics Teacher Preparation. Deborah Schifter, a member of the PSC and a senior scientist at the Educational Development Center, Inc., in Newton, Massachusetts, has worked as an applied mathematician, and has taught elementary, secondary, and college level mathematics. Since 1985, she has been a mathematics teacher educator. She has a B.A. in liberal arts from Saint John's College, Annapolis, Maryland, an M.A. in applied mathematics from the University of Maryland, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Massachusetts. In 1988, Schifter became the director of SummerMath for Teachers, a nationally acclaimed mathematics teacher development program at Mount Holyoke College. In 1993, she moved to the Educational Development Center, where she is now creating a curriculum for teacher learning and directing programs to support the professional development of teacher educators, staff developers, and teacher-leaders. She co-authored with Catherine Twomey Fosnot Reconstructing Mathematics Education: Stories of Teachers Meeting the Challenge of Reform, edited a two-volume anthology of teachers ' writing, What's Happening in Math Class? and co-produced with staff and participants of the Teaching to the Big Ideas project the professional development curriculum, Developing Mathematical Ideas. Erick Smith is an Assistant Professor in Curriculum and Instruction at the University of Illinois at Chicago. In addition to teaching, his interests are in the ethics of teaching mathematics, the nature of mathematics in everyday life, and the preparation of inservice and

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Knowing and Learning Mathematics for Teaching preservice teachers for teaching mathematics in urban settings. He is particularly interested in the contextual aspects of the mathematics of teaching. For fifteen years prior to coming to UIC he was a strawberry farmer in upstate New York and for seven years a research associate at Cornell University on an NSF-funded project looking at the learning and teaching of exponential functions. Olga Garcia Torres is a member of the PSC and an elementary teacher from a multi-age/multi-lingual classroom in Tucson Unified School District in Tucson, Arizona. She is also currently a math/ science support teacher for a Title I Exxon Project for the Tucson district. She is a Presidential Awardee for Excellence in Teaching Mathematics and Science and her work for Arizona includes serving as a member of the State Department of Education Steering Committee for Curriculum Framework and Professional Guide Development. Torres' work outside of the classroom includes work with teachers on equity issues and teaching for understanding as well as video taping classroom practices and instruction for an NSF project. Alan C. Tucker is the SUNY Distinguished Teaching Professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in the Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics. He obtained his Ph.D. in mathematics from Stanford University in 1969. Tucker has been at Stony Brook since 1970. The applied math undergraduate major at Stony Brook, which he developed, regularly produces more graduates in mathematics, on a percentage basis, than any other U.S. public university. His research interests are in combinatorial mathematics. He was a recipient of the Mathematics Association of America's National Award for Distinguished Teaching of Mathematics. He is author of the textbooks, Applied Combinatorics and Linear Algebra. Tucker has led a number of studies about collegiate mathematics including the 1981 CUPM Recommendations for a General Mathematical Sciences Program and two recent NSF-sponsored projects, Assessing Calculus Reform Efforts, and Case Studies in Effective Mathematics Undergraduate Programs. He was MAA First Vice President in 1988-1990 and has chaired the MAA Publications Committee and Education Council. He has been an external consultant/evaluator to fifty mathematics departments. He is currently project director of a large NSF grant for systemic change in quantitative instruction at a consortium of Long Island institutions. Gladys Whitehead received her doctorate in mathematics education from Georgia State University in Atlanta, Georgia. She is a graduate of Florida A & M University and Florida International University. She has worked as a professor of mathematics at Prince George's Community College for the past ten years. She has taught the mathematics courses for elementary education majors. Gladys has been a consultant to public school systems since 1992 where she has provided inservice for elementary and middle school teachers of mathematics. She is currently on leave from the college to serve as the Supervisor of Mathematics to Prince George's County Public Schools.