Appendix G Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

David Z.Robinson (Chair) is a former executive vice president and treasurer of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He also served as executive director of the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government, which recommended improvements in the mechanisms by which the federal and state governments incorporate scientific and technological knowledge into decision making. Prior to joining the Carnegie Corporation, Dr. Robinson worked in the White House as a staff scientist in the Office of the President’s Science Advisor and as vice president for academic affairs at New York University. He was a member of the Panel on Alternatives for the National Research Council’s Committees for a Study of the Structure of the NIH, the Committee on Minorities in Science, and the Committee on Women in Science. Dr. Robinson received his Ph.D. in chemical physics from Harvard University.

Linda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E.Ducommun professor of teaching and teacher education at Stanford University, where her research focuses on school restructuring, teacher education, and educational equity. She also is executive director of the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, a blue-ribbon panel that has studied policy changes aimed at improving teaching and schooling. She served as chair of both New York State’s Council on Curriculum and Assessment and the Model Standards Committee for the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium. She is coauthor of A License to Teach: Raising Standards for Teaching (Jossey-Bass Inc., 1999). Dr. Darling-Hammond received her Ed.D. in urban education from Temple University.



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Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Appendix G Biographical Sketches of Committee Members David Z.Robinson (Chair) is a former executive vice president and treasurer of the Carnegie Corporation of New York. He also served as executive director of the Carnegie Commission on Science, Technology, and Government, which recommended improvements in the mechanisms by which the federal and state governments incorporate scientific and technological knowledge into decision making. Prior to joining the Carnegie Corporation, Dr. Robinson worked in the White House as a staff scientist in the Office of the President’s Science Advisor and as vice president for academic affairs at New York University. He was a member of the Panel on Alternatives for the National Research Council’s Committees for a Study of the Structure of the NIH, the Committee on Minorities in Science, and the Committee on Women in Science. Dr. Robinson received his Ph.D. in chemical physics from Harvard University. Linda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E.Ducommun professor of teaching and teacher education at Stanford University, where her research focuses on school restructuring, teacher education, and educational equity. She also is executive director of the National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future, a blue-ribbon panel that has studied policy changes aimed at improving teaching and schooling. She served as chair of both New York State’s Council on Curriculum and Assessment and the Model Standards Committee for the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium. She is coauthor of A License to Teach: Raising Standards for Teaching (Jossey-Bass Inc., 1999). Dr. Darling-Hammond received her Ed.D. in urban education from Temple University.

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Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality Carl A.Grant is the Hoefs-Bascom professor of teacher education and a professor of Afro-American studies at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research focuses on multicultural education and teacher education, and he is president of the National Association for Multicultural Education. Dr. Grant received his Ph.D. in education, curriculum, and instruction from the University of Wisconsin. Milton D.Hakel is a professor and the Ohio Board of Regents eminent scholar in psychology at Bowling Green State University. His research focuses on leadership development, performance appraisal, job analysis and compensation, and employee selection. He also is president of Organizational Research and Development, Inc., a firm that provides human resources research consultation. Dr. Hakel serves on the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Minnesota. Abigail L.Hughes is associate commissioner of the Division of Evaluation and Research, Connecticut State Department of Education and is responsible for the state’s student assessment program, beginning teacher induction program, and statewide data collection, evaluation, and research. Prior to joining the Connecticut agency, she served as director of instructional services for a regional service agency in New York state, as a teacher in Maryland and Florida, and as a curriculum coordinator in Ohio. Dr. Hughes received her Ph.D. in educational administration and an M.B.A. from Ohio State University. Mary M.Kennedy is a professor in the College of Education at Michigan State University, where her research focuses on teacher education and learning. From 1986 through 1993, she directed the National Center for Research on Teacher Learning, a federally funded research center based at Michigan State University. Dr. Kennedy received her Ph.D. in educational psychology from Michigan State University. Stephen P.Klein is a senior research scientist at the RAND Corporation, where he conducts studies on educational testing policies and practices. He also provides consulting services for various certification and licensing examinations. Dr. Klein served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Appropriate Test Use and the Committee on Education Finance. He is also coauthor of A License to Teach: Raising Standards for Teaching (Jossey-Bass Inc., 1999), Dr. Klein received his Ph.D. in industrial psychology from Purdue University. Catherine Manski is a lecturer and field instructor for English student teachers in the Department of English, University of Illinois, Chicago. Previously, she was a social studies and English-as-a-second-language teacher at West High

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Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality School in Madison, Wisconsin. Ms. Manski received her M.S. in curriculum and instruction from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. C.Ford Morishita is a biology teacher at Clackamas High School in Milwaukie, Oregon, and was the 1997 Oregon State Teacher of the Year. He also teaches in the School of Education at Portland State University. He received his M.A.T. in biological science from Lewis and Clark College. Pamela A.Moss is an associate professor in the School of Education at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the validity of educational assessments, particularly the assessment of teachers. Dr. Moss serves on the joint committee revising the Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing of the American Educational Research Association, the American Psychological Association, and the National Council of Measurement in Education. She also cochairs the technical advisory committee for the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium and serves on the Measurement Research Advisory Panel of the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards. Dr. Moss received her Ph.D. in educational research methodology from the University of Pittsburgh. Barbara S.Plake is director of the Oscar and Luella Buros Center for Testing and the W.C.Meierhenry distinguished university professor at the University of Nebraska, Lincoln. She is coeditor of the Mental Measurements Yearbook and Applied Measurement in Education. Dr. Plake serves on the American Psychological Association’s Committee on Psychological Tests and Assessments. She received her Ph.D. in educational statistics and measurement from the University of Iowa. David L.Rose is an attorney in private practice in Washington, D.C., specializing in equal employment opportunity issues and other employment-related matters. From 1969 through 1987, he was chief of the Employment Litigation Section, Civil Rights Division, U.S. Department of Justice, which is responsible for enforcement of laws requiring nondiscrimination in employment and equal employment opportunity. Mr. Rose received his L.L.B. from Harvard Law School. Portia Holmes Shields is president of Albany State University. A former teacher and reading specialist, she has also served as the dean of the School of Education at Howard University. Dr. Shields received her Ph.D. in early childhood and elementary education from the University of Maryland, College Park. James W.Stigler is a professor of psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles. His research focuses on comparative studies of mathematics and

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Testing Teacher Candidates: The Role of Licensure Tests in Improving Teacher Quality science teaching and learning among elementary and middle school children in different countries, including Japan, China, the Czech Republic, Netherlands, Switzerland, Australia, and the United States. Dr. Stigler is coauthor of The Teaching Gap: Best Ideas from the World’s Teachers for Improving Education in the Classroom (The Free Press, 1999). He received his Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the University of Michigan. Kenneth I.Wolpin is a professor of economics at the University of Pennsylvania. His research focuses on life-cycle decision making. Dr. Wolpin serves on the National Research Council’s Board on Testing and Assessment. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the Graduate School of the City University of New York.