APPENDIX E

Committee and Staff Biographies

ASSEN V. JABLENSKY, M.D., (Co-chair) is Professor and Head of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of Western Australia in Perth. He is a co-chair for this committee. Dr. Jablensky has formerly served as the Senior Medical Officer for the Division of Mental Health at the World Health Organization, Geneva (1975–1986), where he was responsible for cross-cultural collaborative research into the epidemiology of schizophrenia and other mental disorders. He has served as the Director of the National Program of Neuroscience and Behavior Research and President of the Academy of Medicine in Sofia, Bulgaria. His recent research includes an examination of the interactions between genetic vulnerability and environmental risk factors in schizophrenia; and the role of prenatal exposures and obstetric complications in the causation of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and mental retardation. Dr. Jablensky 's experience in developing countries and his contribution to the development and evaluation of national mental health programs in Tanzania, Bulgaria, and other countries is of particular importance to this study.

RICHARD T. JOHNSON, M.D., (Co-chair) is Professor of Neurology and Microbiology and Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School and the School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a co-chair of this committee. His most recent research has been concentrated on HIV-associated neurological disease and cytokines and cofactors in development of disease in the central nervous system. Dr. Johnson is the founding Director of the Neuroscience Institute of Singapore. He has been a visiting professor at the Universidad Peruana Cayetano, Lima, Peru; Im-



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Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders: Meeting the Challenge in the Developing World APPENDIX E Committee and Staff Biographies ASSEN V. JABLENSKY, M.D., (Co-chair) is Professor and Head of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of Western Australia in Perth. He is a co-chair for this committee. Dr. Jablensky has formerly served as the Senior Medical Officer for the Division of Mental Health at the World Health Organization, Geneva (1975–1986), where he was responsible for cross-cultural collaborative research into the epidemiology of schizophrenia and other mental disorders. He has served as the Director of the National Program of Neuroscience and Behavior Research and President of the Academy of Medicine in Sofia, Bulgaria. His recent research includes an examination of the interactions between genetic vulnerability and environmental risk factors in schizophrenia; and the role of prenatal exposures and obstetric complications in the causation of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and mental retardation. Dr. Jablensky 's experience in developing countries and his contribution to the development and evaluation of national mental health programs in Tanzania, Bulgaria, and other countries is of particular importance to this study. RICHARD T. JOHNSON, M.D., (Co-chair) is Professor of Neurology and Microbiology and Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University Medical School and the School of Hygiene and Public Health. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a co-chair of this committee. His most recent research has been concentrated on HIV-associated neurological disease and cytokines and cofactors in development of disease in the central nervous system. Dr. Johnson is the founding Director of the Neuroscience Institute of Singapore. He has been a visiting professor at the Universidad Peruana Cayetano, Lima, Peru; Im-

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Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders: Meeting the Challenge in the Developing World perial College of Health Sciences, Pahlavi Medical Center, Tehran, Iran; Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; and Institut fur Virologie and Immunobiologie, Wurzburg, Germany. Dr. Johnson has served previously on IOM committees, research panels, and review committees. WILLIAM E. BUNNEY, M.D., is Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and Human Behavior at University of California, Irvine. Dr. Bunney is a member of the Institute of Medicine and is a member of this committee. He serves on the National Scientific Advisory Board of the National Alliance of Research in Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD), and the National Depressive and Manic-Depressive Association, and previously served on the extramural scientific advisory board at the National Institute for Mental Health. His major research interests involve clinical psychobiological studies of manic depressive illness, schizophrenia, and childhood mental illness. These include behavioral studies of the efficacy and mode of action of psycho-pharmacological agents, brain imaging studies, and investigation of brain circuitry abnormality which may be related to the major psychosis period. Dr. Bunney is the author of more than 360 scientific publications and the editor of seven books. MARCELO CRUZ, M.D., is Professor of Neurology, Neurosciences Institute, Central University of Ecuador. He is a member of this committee. He has published on neuroepidemiology, epilepsy, parasitic diseases, and neurodevelopmental disabilities. His current research examines cerebral cysticercosis as the cause of epilepsy, hydrocephalus, and dementia, as well as the clinical description, the distribution, and means of prevention and control of this parasitic infection. Dr. Cruz is the former Minister of Public Health of Ecuador, and a World Bank consultant for health reform. He currently serves as president of the Ecuadorean Academy of Neurosciences, and is an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Neurology. He also belongs to the Latin American Society of Pediatric Neurology, the Pan American Society of Neuroepidemiology, and the Francophone Network on Research of the Nervous System. MAUREEN DURKIN, PH.D., DR.P.H., is Associate Professor of Public Health (Epidemiology) at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and Sergievsky Center, and Research Scientist at the New York State Psychiatric Institute 's Epidemiology of Brain Disorders Unit. She is a member of the committee. Dr. Durkin has developed methodology for and directed comparative studies of the prevalence and causes of neurodevelopmental disabilities in developing countries. Her current research pertains to international policies relevant to public health and developmental disabilities, the epidemiology and prevention of pediatric neurotrauma, and long-term outcomes of premature birth. She has published widely on these topics, presented at national and inter-

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Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders: Meeting the Challenge in the Developing World national scientific meetings, and taught graduate-level courses. Dr. Durkin has served as an advisor to the World Health Organization and a consultant to numerous organizations including the United Nations Statistical Office and the National Institutes of Health. JULIUS FAMILUSI, M.D., is the Chair of the Department of Pediatrics, University of Ibadan, Nigeria, and a Consultant Pediatric Neurologist of the University College Hospital. He is a member of this committee. Dr. Familusi has previously served as a Visiting Professor of Pediatrics and Neurology at SUNY-Albany, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia, and the University of Zimbabwe, Harare. His recent research includes a comparison of folate levels in convulsing and non-convulsing febrile children, and cerebellar disorders in childhood. Dr. Familusi has researched and published in the areas of pediatrics and pediatric neurology with special emphasis on viral and bacterial infections of the central nervous system, seizure disorders, neurotoxins, and hemoglobinopathies. Dr. Familusi is an Executive Board member of the International Child Neurology Association. MANDAVILLE GOURIE-DEVI, M.B.B.S., M.D. (MED), D.M. (NEURO), is the Director–Vice Chancellor and Professor of Neurology at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences in Bangalore, India. She is a member of this committee. She is a fellow of the Indian Academy of Neurology, National Academy of Medical Sciences, and National Academy of Sciences in India. She was the President of the Neurological Society of India. Dr. Gourie-Devi's research focuses on the prevalence and pattern of neurological disorders in the Indian population (which includes the epidemiology of epilepsy), tuberculous meningitis, motor neuron disease, muscular dystrophy, leprosy, stroke, and Japanese encephalitis. She has authored the book, Neuroepidemiology in Developing Countries. Dr. Gourie-Devi is the founding editor of the Annals of the Indian Academy of Neurology. DEAN JAMISON, PH.D., is the Director of the Program on International Health, Education and Environment at University of California, Los Angeles. Jamison serves as a liaison member to the committee from the IOM's Board on Global Health. He is the lead author of the World Bank's 1993 Development Report, Investing in Health. Jamison has researched and published on health policy for low-and middle- income countries, cost-effectiveness analysis, and assessment of health research and development priorities. The Institute of Medicine elected him to membership in 1994. RACHEL JENKINS, M.D., is the Director of the WHO Collaborating Centre and Professor at the Institute of Psychiatry in London, England. She is a member of the committee. She has published widely on the global burden of mental dis-

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Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders: Meeting the Challenge in the Developing World orders, mental health policy, and planning using epidemiology and disability measurements, primary care, and epidemiology and outcome indicators. Dr. Jenkins was formerly Principal Medical Officer of the Mental Health Division at the British Department of Health. She developed the mental illness key area of England's Health of the Nation strategy, and the first national survey program of psychiatric morbidity in Great Britain. Dr. Jenkins has conducted research and mental health policy support in many developing countries. SYLVIA KAAYA, M.D., is Head of the Department of Psychiatry at the Muhimbili University College of Health Sciences of the University of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. She is a member of the committee. Dr. Kaaya is a senior lecturer in psychiatry. She has researched and published in the areas of adolescent and youth development and risk behaviors as well as depression in sub-Saharan Africa. Dr. Kaaya is a member of the International Scientific Advisory Committee of the Essential Health Interventions Project of the International Development Research Council, the Medical Association of Tanzania, and serves on the Executive Committee of the Tanzania Public Health Association. ARTHUR KLEINMAN, M.D., is the Presley Professor of Anthropology and Psychiatry, Departments of Anthropology and Social Medicine at Harvard University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a member of the committee. Dr. Kleinman has published widely on mental illness in developing countries, and most recently on the relationship between mental health and social health perspectives and Chinese communities undergoing change from local, national, and global forces. Dr. Kleinman is Chair of the World Health Organization Technical Advisory Committee for the Mental Health of Underserved Populations Action Program and a WHO Consultant for the Chinese Ministry of Health in Beijing. THOMAS MCGUIRE, PH.D., is Professor of Economics at Boston University. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a member of the committee. Dr. McGuire 's fields of expertise include health and mental health economics, industrial organization, and public health finance. His recent research work examining economics and mental health will contribute to the committee's evaluation of low-cost treatments and program development. Dr. McGuire has published on mental health and substance abuse coverage under health care reform; demand and supply-side cost sharing in health care; payment and financing of mental health services; and optimal market structures for health care. Dr. McGuire has served as co-chair of four National Institute of Mental Health-sponsored conferences on economics and mental health. R. SRINIVASA MURTHY, M.B.B.S., M.D., is Dean and Professor of Psychiatry at the National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences in India.

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Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders: Meeting the Challenge in the Developing World He is a member of the committee. Dr. Murthy is a fellow in the Indian Psychiatric Society and the National Academy of Medical Sciences. He has researched and published on the epidemiology of schizophrenia and the application of community-based interventions in primary care settings to prevent mental illness and promote mental health. Dr. Murthy has consulted with governments of many developing countries on the development of national mental health programs and the training of providers. Dr. Murthy is currently the Chief Editor of the upcoming World Health Organization World Health Report, 2001. DONALD SILBERBERG, M.D., is Professor of Neurology, Senior Associate Dean (Chair Emeritus) and Director of International Programs at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He is a member of the committee. Dr. Silberberg 's research has focused on metabolic disorders affecting brain development, clinical and basic aspects of multiple sclerosis, and approaches to ameliorating neurological disease in developing countries. Dr. Silberberg serves as a consultant for the World Health Organization (currently Consultant for the Global Burden of Mental and Neurological Diseases project), Global Forum for Health Research, National Institutes of Health, and the World Bank. BEDIRHAN USTUN, M.D., is the Coordinator of the Classification, Assessment and Surveys Unit at the World Health Organization. He is a member of the committee. Dr. Ustun conducted various international studies on diagnosis, classification, and management of mental disorders in primary care settings and developed structured intervention strategies. Dr. Ustun, in his role at WHO, has a broad public health view of nervous system disorders globally and direct access to worldwide data on the burden of disease and mental health programs. STUDY STAFF JUDITH BALE, PH.D. is Director of the Board on Global Health at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), and co-director of Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders in Developing Countries. She directed The Assessment of Future Scientific Needs for Live Variola Virus and co-edited Control of Cardiovascular Disease in Developing Countries. Before IOM, while in the National Academies' Office of International Affairs, she developed and directed collaborative research programs on health and agriculture in more than 30 developing countries. She directed studies on technology transfer in Pakistan; technological challenges for megacities; population growth and land use change in India, China, and the United States; and international nutrition. Dr. Bale serves as a reviewer for several journals and speaker on international health issues. Prior to joining the National Academies, her laboratory research was at the National In-

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Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disorders: Meeting the Challenge in the Developing World stitute of Heart, Lung, and Blood, where she published on enzyme kinetics, structure, and mechanisms. STACEY KNOBLER, is a program officer at the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She is the co-director of Neurological, Psychiatric, and Developmental Disabilities in Developing Countries and study director of the Board on Global Health's Forum on Emerging Infections. Ms. Knobler is actively involved in program research and development for the Board on Global Health. Previously, she has held positions as a Research Associate at the Brookings Institution, Foreign Policy Studies Program and as a Human Rights and Development Consultant for the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe in Vienna and Bosnia-Herzegovina. Ms. Knobler has also worked as a research and negotiations analyst in Israel and Palestine. Ms. Knobler is currently a member of the CBACI Senior Working Group for Health, Security, and U.S. Global Leadership. She has conducted research and co-authored published articles on biological and nuclear weapons control, foreign aid, health in developing countries, poverty and public assistance, human rights, and the Arab-Israeli peace process.