Appendix B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

JERRY P. GOLLUB (Cochair) is John and Barbara Bush Professor in the Natural Sciences (Physics) at Haverford College. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a recipient of a research award from the American Physical Society. His research focuses on nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena, including instabilities and pattern formation in fluids, chaotic dynamics and turbulence, and granular materials. He is coauthor of Chaotic Dynamics: An Introduction, an undergraduate textbook. Since 1981 he has also been affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, where he is a member of the graduate groups in both physics and mechanical engineering. Dr. Gollub has served as Provost of Haverford College and currently chairs its Physics Department. He has served on the advisory board of the National Science Resources Center, curriculum developers for schools, and has been a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. He received his Ph.D. in experimental condensed matter physics from Harvard University.

PHILIP C. CURTIS, JR. (Cochair) is Professor of Mathematics Emeritus at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he has taught mathematics since 1955. He has served as vice chair and chair of the University of California Board of Admissions and Relations with Schools, chairman of the faculty of the UCLA College of Letters and Science, chair of the UCLA Mathematics Department, director of the UCLA Teaching Interns Program in Mathematics, and chair of the Committee for Mathematics and Science Scholars. Dr. Curtis has served on the NRC’s Study Group on Guidelines for Mathematics Assessment. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University.

CAMILLA BENBOW is Dean of the Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University. Her field is educational psychology, and her research has focused on the optimal development of talent,



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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools Appendix B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members JERRY P. GOLLUB (Cochair) is John and Barbara Bush Professor in the Natural Sciences (Physics) at Haverford College. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a recipient of a research award from the American Physical Society. His research focuses on nonlinear and nonequilibrium phenomena, including instabilities and pattern formation in fluids, chaotic dynamics and turbulence, and granular materials. He is coauthor of Chaotic Dynamics: An Introduction, an undergraduate textbook. Since 1981 he has also been affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania, where he is a member of the graduate groups in both physics and mechanical engineering. Dr. Gollub has served as Provost of Haverford College and currently chairs its Physics Department. He has served on the advisory board of the National Science Resources Center, curriculum developers for schools, and has been a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC) Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications. He received his Ph.D. in experimental condensed matter physics from Harvard University. PHILIP C. CURTIS, JR. (Cochair) is Professor of Mathematics Emeritus at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he has taught mathematics since 1955. He has served as vice chair and chair of the University of California Board of Admissions and Relations with Schools, chairman of the faculty of the UCLA College of Letters and Science, chair of the UCLA Mathematics Department, director of the UCLA Teaching Interns Program in Mathematics, and chair of the Committee for Mathematics and Science Scholars. Dr. Curtis has served on the NRC’s Study Group on Guidelines for Mathematics Assessment. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University. CAMILLA BENBOW is Dean of the Peabody College of Education and Human Development at Vanderbilt University. Her field is educational psychology, and her research has focused on the optimal development of talent,

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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools strategies for teaching gifted and talented students, and academic achievement in math and science. She has also served as director of the Iowa Talent Search Program and as codirector for the Study of Mathematically Precocious Youth at The Johns Hopkins University, at Iowa State University, and now at Vanderbilt. In addition, she has directed other studies and programs for gifted and talented and mathematically precocious youth. Dr. Benbow received her M.A. in psychology and her M.S. and Ph.D. in education from The Johns Hopkins University. HILDA BORKO is a professor in the School of Education at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her field is educational psychology, and her research has focused on teacher cognition and teacher learning. Specific interests have included teachers’ understanding of education reform, teacher preparation and professional development, and instruction and assessment. Dr. Borko has served on numerous professional committees. In addition to her service editing and reviewing for professional publications, she has published extensively on many aspects of teacher preparation and learning to teach. She received her M.A. in the philosophy of education and her Ph.D. in educational psychology from the University of California at Los Angeles. WANDA BUSSEY is Mathematics Department chair and teacher of International Baccalaureate Higher Level Mathematics at Rufus King High School in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where she has taught since 1979. She assisted the school in instituting and developing its IB program and is an IB Senior Teacher. She has also served as an assistant examiner for the IB Examinations Office. Her work in that capacity has entailed curriculum development, modeling of her school’s program for others, and presentations at IB workshops around the country. Ms. Bussey has taught calculus at Marquette University and at the University of Wisconsin and is a recipient of the Tandy Technology Scholar Teacher of the Year award. She received her M.S. in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. GLENN A. CROSBY is Professor of Chemistry and Materials Science Emeritus at Washington State University. His research has focused on investigation of the electronic excited states of metal complexes; design of materials for solar energy storage; investigation of photochemical reactions; and design of semi-conducting, photoconducting, and paramagnetic solids. Dr. Crosby has received numerous awards for his teaching and has been active in the development of science programs for high school students and professional development programs for teachers. He received his Ph.D. in physical chemistry from the University of Washington.

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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools JOHN A. DOSSEY is Distinguished University Professor of Mathematics Emeritus at Illinois State University. His research interests include evaluation in mathematics education, international mathematics education, and assessment in mathematics education. Dr. Dossey served as president of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics during the writing of that organization’s standards for school mathematics. He has also chaired the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences and the U.S. Commission on Mathematical Instruction at the NRC, as well as the College Board’s Mathematical Sciences Advisory Committee. He has served on the NRC’s Board on International Comparative Studies in Education, which has devoted considerable attention to the Third International Mathematics and Science Study. Dr. Dossey received his Ph.D. in mathematics education from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. DAVID ELY is a teacher of Advanced Placement Biology at Champlain Valley Union High School in Hinesburg, Vermont. He has been an exam reader for the AP biology program for 7 years and has been involved in the development of Vermont’s science framework and assessments. Mr. Ely has been named National Science Teachers Association/Shell Outstanding National Science Teacher of the Year and has received the Distinguished Teacher Award from the White House Commission on Scholars, as well as many other teaching awards. He received his B.A. and M.A.T. in zoology from the University of Vermont. DEBORAH HUGHES HALLETT is a professor of mathematics at the University of Arizona; from 1991 to 1998 she was a professor of Practice in the Teaching of Mathematics at Harvard University. She was a principal investigator for the National Science Foundation (NSF)–funded Bridge Calculus Consortium. She has served on committees for the Graduate Record Examination and the Massachusetts state mathematics framework review process, and on the Mathematics and Science Teacher Education Program (MASTEP) Advisory Board, an NSF-funded program to improve teacher training in California. Dr. Hughes Hallett served on the NRC’s Committee on Information Technology in Undergraduate Education. A Fulbright Scholar, she received M.A. degrees from both Harvard University and the University of Cambridge, England. JOHN K. HAYNES is David Packard Professor of Science and chair of the Biology Department at Morehouse College. He is also an adjunct professor of Physiology at Brown University. He has served on a number of panels concerned with education issues, including that for the Undergraduate Bio-

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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools logical Sciences Education Program of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Dr. Haynes served on the NRC’s Committee on Undergraduate Science Education and has been a councilor in the Biology Division for the Council on Undergraduate Research. He serves as chair of the Minorities Affairs Committee of the American Society for Cell Biology. He received his Ph.D. in developmental biology from Brown University. VALERIE E. LEE is a professor of education at the University of Michigan. Her research has focused on school size and the development of more personalized social relations in schools. She has also studied high school restructuring, factors that influence achievement, ability tracking, and academic behaviors. Some of her research has targeted the development of high-achieving minority students and gender differences in mathematics and science achievement. Dr. Lee received her Ed.D. from Harvard University. STEPHANIE PACE MARSHALL is founding president of the Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy and has served in that capacity since 1986. A former Superintendent of Schools in Batavia, Illinois, she has also served as president of the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development International, and was founding president of the National Consortium for Specialized Schools of Mathematics, Science, and Technology. Dr. Marshall received her M.A. in curriculum and philosophy from the University of Chicago and her Ph.D. in educational administration and industrial relations from Loyola University in Chicago. MICHAEL E. MARTINEZ joined the NSF in September 2001 as a program officer in the Division of Research, Evaluation, and Communication. He is currently on leave from the University of California, Irvine, Department of Education, where he teaches courses in the psychology of learning and intelligence, evaluation and assessment, and research methods. A former high school science teacher, Dr. Martinez received his Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from Stanford University in 1987. He then joined the Division of Research at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, New Jersey, where he developed new forms of computer-based testing for assessment in science, architecture, and engineering. This work led to two U.S. patents. In 1994–1995, Dr. Martinez was a Fulbright Scholar at the University of the South Pacific in the Fiji Islands. He now conducts research on the nature of proficiency in science and mathematics and on the nature and modifiability of intelligence. He has published in such journals as Educational Psychologist, the Journal of Educational Measurement, and the Journal of the American Society for Information Science. His first book, Education as the Cultivation of Intelligence, was published in 2000 by Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools PATSY W. MUELLER taught science at Highland Park High School in Highland Park, Illinois, from 1966 until 2001, when she accepted a position teaching science at Regina Dominican High School in Wilmette, Illinois. For the past 24 years, Ms. Mueller has taught both Honors Chemistry and the Advanced Placement Chemistry course. She has conducted numerous AP summer institutes since 1991, including week-long sessions for other AP Chemistry teachers. Ms. Mueller has served as a member of the American Chemical Society’s (ACS) Test Development Committee and the College Board’s Chemistry Test Development Committee. She has received the Tandy Technology Award and been named a Siemens Scholar, both in recognition of her excellence in teaching. Ms. Mueller received her B.S. in chemical education from the University of Illinois and her M.S. in chemistry from Clarkson. JOSEPH NOVAK is visiting senior research scientist at the Institute for Human and Machine Cognition at the University of West Florida. Previously he was professor of science education and Professor of Biological Sciences Emeritus at Cornell University, where he taught from 1969 to 1998. Dr. Novak has conducted research on teaching and learning in science and other areas. His research team developed the concept mapping tool now being used widely in schools and corporations. His recent books include Learning, Creating and Using Knowledge; Teaching Science for Understanding; and Assessing Science Understanding (with Joel Mintzes and James Wandersee). He has received numerous honors, including the first award for outstanding research contributions to science teaching from the Council of Scientific Society Presidents. Dr. Novak received an M.S. in science education and a Ph.D. degree in science education and biology from the University of Minnesota. JEANNIE OAKES is Presidential Professor of Education in the Graduate School of Information Studies at the University of California at Los Angeles. She directs UCLA’s Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access and the University of California’s All Campus Collaborative on Research for Diversity. She has also served as a consultant and Senior Social Scientist for the Education and Human Resources Program at RAND in Santa Monica. Dr. Oakes’s research has focused on resources and learning opportunities in U.S. schools, school reform, tracking, school organization, and curriculum. She received her M.A. in American studies from the California State University in Los Angeles and her Ph.D. in education from UCLA. VERA RUBIN is an observational astronomer in the Department of Terrestrial Magnetism at the Carnegie Institution of Washington and a member of the National Academy of Sciences. She is a recipient of the National Medal of

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Learning and Understanding: Improving Advanced Study of Mathematics and Science in U.S. High Schools Science and was honored at the Academy’s first annual Women in Science and Engineering program. She is a former member of the Board on Physics and Astronomy and has served on many other NRC bodies. She earned her Ph.D. from Georgetown University. ROBIN SPITAL is a teacher of Honors and Advanced Placement Physics at The Bolles School in Jacksonville, Florida. His career began at Illinois State University in Normal, where he was assistant professor of physics. He subsequently worked in the private sector as principal development engineer for the AAI Corporation in Hunt Valley, Maryland, and as principal scientist for Pfizer Medical Systems. Dr. Spital received his Ph.D. in theoretical high-energy physics from Cornell University. CONRAD L. STANITSKI is professor of chemistry and chair of the Chemistry Department at the University of Central Arkansas. His principal focus is inorganic chemistry and general chemistry for science and nonscience majors. He is currently Chair of the ACS Division of Chemical Education, was a member of the ACS Committee on Education, has directed numerous ACS teacher-training workshops, is an NSF proposal reviewer, and has been an invited speaker and workshop leader in seven foreign countries. Dr. Stanitski has authored or coauthored several highly regarded textbooks in the field, including Chemistry in Context: Applying Chemistry to Society; The Chemical World: Concepts and Applications; Chemical Principles; Chemistry in the Community; and Chemistry for Health-Related Sciences: Concepts and Applications. He received his B.S. in science education from Bloomsburg State College, his M.A. in chemistry education from the University of Northern Iowa, and his Ph.D. in inorganic chemistry from the University of Connecticut. WILLIAM B. WOOD is professor of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology at the University of Colorado, Boulder, where he formerly served as department Chair. He is a member of the NAS, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a recipient of the NAS Molecular Biology Award. His current research focuses on the mechanisms by which cell fates and patterns are determined during embryonic development of the nematode C. elegans, using techniques of genetics, cell biology, and molecular biology. Dr. Wood was lead author of the widely used textbook Biochemistry: A Problems Approach, which helped introduce problem-based learning to biochemistry; he subsequently spearheaded the development of a graduate core course in molecular, cellular, and developmental biology that served as a model for many departments around the country. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from Stanford University.