APPENDIX A Committee Biographies

Bert Vogelstein, MD (Chair), Johns Hopkins Oncology Center and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is professor of oncology and pathology at the Johns Hopkins University and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He has broad expertise in the molecular and cell biological processes underlying human disease. His research seeks to understand the complex sequence of genetic alterations that are responsible for transforming a normal colon cell to a malignant one. He has won numerous awards, including the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor, the Gairdner Foundation International Award in Science, the Baxter Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the Clowes Memorial Award from the American Association for Cancer Research, the Pezcoller Award from the European School of Oncology, the William Beaumont Prize in Gastroenterology from the American Gastroenterological Association, the Karnofsky Memorial Award from the American Society for Clinical Oncology, the William Allan Award from the American Society of Human Genetics, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize from the Paul Ehrlich Foundation, the Richard Lounsbery Award from the National Academy of Sciences, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize from Columbia University, and the Charles S. Mott Prize from the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation. Dr. Vogelstein is a member of the American Academy of Arts and



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Stem Cells and the Future of Regenerative Medicine APPENDIX A Committee Biographies Bert Vogelstein, MD (Chair), Johns Hopkins Oncology Center and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is professor of oncology and pathology at the Johns Hopkins University and an investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. He has broad expertise in the molecular and cell biological processes underlying human disease. His research seeks to understand the complex sequence of genetic alterations that are responsible for transforming a normal colon cell to a malignant one. He has won numerous awards, including the American Cancer Society Medal of Honor, the Gairdner Foundation International Award in Science, the Baxter Award from the Association of American Medical Colleges, the Clowes Memorial Award from the American Association for Cancer Research, the Pezcoller Award from the European School of Oncology, the William Beaumont Prize in Gastroenterology from the American Gastroenterological Association, the Karnofsky Memorial Award from the American Society for Clinical Oncology, the William Allan Award from the American Society of Human Genetics, the Paul Ehrlich and Ludwig Darmstaedter Prize from the Paul Ehrlich Foundation, the Richard Lounsbery Award from the National Academy of Sciences, the Louisa Gross Horwitz Prize from Columbia University, and the Charles S. Mott Prize from the General Motors Cancer Research Foundation. Dr. Vogelstein is a member of the American Academy of Arts and

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Stem Cells and the Future of Regenerative Medicine Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. He received his BA in mathematics from the University of Pennsylvania and his MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He performed his internship and residency in pediatrics at the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Barry R. Bloom, PhD, Harvard School of Public Health, is dean of the faculty and professor of immunology and infectious diseases at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research interests include immunology, resistance to infectious disease, vaccine development, and international health. Dr. Bloom chairs the WHO UNAIDS Vaccine Advisory Committee and serves on the National AIDS Vaccine Research Committee. He recently received a major grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for an AIDS-prevention initiative in Nigeria. He was a member of the National Advisory Council of the National Institute for Allergy and Infectious Diseases and the US National Vaccine Advisory Committee. He was president of the American Association of Immunologists and President of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology. He serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of the National Center for Infectious Diseases of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the National Advisory Board of the Fogarty International Center at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Bloom is chairman of the Board of Trustees of the International Vaccine Institute. He was cochair of the Board on Global Health of the Institute of Medicine. He received the first Bristol-Myers Squibb Award for Distinguished Research in Infectious Diseases, shared the Novartis Award in Immunology, and was the recipient of the Robert Koch Gold Medal for lifetime research in infectious diseases. Dr. Bloom is a member the Institute of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences. He received his AB, and an honorary SD, from Amherst College, his MA from Harvard University; and his PhD from the Rockefeller University. Corey Goodman, PhD, University of California, Berkeley, and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, is Evan Rauch Professor of Neuroscience in

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Stem Cells and the Future of Regenerative Medicine the Department of Molecular and Cell Biology and a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator. He is director of the Wills Neuroscience Institute, whose mission is to build bridges across traditional academic boundaries from genes and genomes to brain and behavior. His expertise is in developmental neurobiology—using genetic analysis to unravel the mechanisms that control the “wiring” of the brain. He was elected a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 1995 and in January 2001 became chair of the Board on Life Sciences of the National Research Council. He serves as president of the McKnight Endowment Fund for neuroscience. He is cofounder of two biotechnology companies—Exelixis and Renovis—and is cochair of the Renovis Scientific Advisory Board. He is the recipient of the Foundation IPSEN Neuronal Plasticity Prize, the J. Allyn Taylor International Prize in Medicine, the Gairdner Foundation International Award for Achievement in Medical Sciences, the Ameritec Foundation Prize, the Wakeman Award, and the March-of-Dimes Prize in Developmental Biology. He received his BS in biology from Stanford University and his PhD in developmental neurobiology from the University of California, Berkeley. Patricia King, JD, Georgetown University Law Center, is Carmack Waterhouse Professor of Law, Medicine, Ethics and Public Policy at the Georgetown University Law Center. Her research interests include law, bioethics, and public policy. She has concentrated on reproductive and scientific issues related to embryos and fetuses. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine and a fellow of both the Hastings Center and the Kennedy Institute of Ethics. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Assessing the System for Protecting Human Subjects, the cochair for policy of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Embryo Research Panel, and a member of Working Group to Advise ACD (NIH) on Guidelines and Oversight of stem cell research. She has previously served on the Institute’s Committee on Organ Procurement and Transplantation Policy and Committee on Perinatal Transmission of HIV. She received her JD from Harvard Law School.

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Stem Cells and the Future of Regenerative Medicine Guy McKhann, MD, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, is professor of neurology, Zanvyl Krieger Mind/Brain Institute of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. His research involves neurologic and cognitive outcomes of cardiac surgery and definition of a new form of Guillain-Barre syndrome. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and has served on the IOM Committee to Plan the Symposium on Neuroscience and Brain Research. He is also a member of the American Neurological Association, the American Neuro-chemical Society, the Society of Neuroscience, and the American Academy of Neurologists. He received his MD from Yale University. Myron L. Weisfeldt, MD, Columbia University, is the chairman of the Department of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and the Samuel Bard Professor of Medicine. He is also the director of the Medical Service at the Columbia-Presbyterian Center of the New York Presbyterian Hospital. Before assuming these positions, Dr. Weisfeldt was the Director of the Cardiology Division at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Weisfeldt received his undergraduate and medical degree from Johns Hopkins University. He received research training at the National Institutes of Health. His clinical training was at Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, and his cardiology training at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He has served as president of the American Heart Association. Dr. Weisfeldt is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, and the Association of Professors of Medicine. He received the Golden Heart Award and the Award of Merit of the American Heart Association. Kathleen R. Merikangas, PhD, Yale University School of Medicine (liaison to committee from the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health), is professor of epidemiology and psychiatry and director of the Genetic Epidemiology Research Unit at the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Merikangas has formal training in clinical psychology, chronic disease epidemiology, and human genetics. She is on the edito-

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Stem Cells and the Future of Regenerative Medicine rial board of several scientific journals and is a member of the Core Scientific Advisory Panel for the MacArthur Foundation Network on Psychopathology and Development and the Psychobiology of Affective Disorders and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Research Network on the Etiology of Tobacco Dependence. She has also served on review committees of the National Institute of Mental Health, the National Institute of Drug Abuse, and the National Advisory Mental Health Council Work Group on Mental Disorders Prevention Research and several scientific organizations abroad. Dr. Merikangas has recently joined the National Advisory Council of the National Institute of Drug Abuse. Her major research interests are sources of familial aggregation of psychopathology, comorbidity of mental disorders and substance abuse, vulnerability factors for emotional and behavioral problems in youth, and the public-health impact of prevention.

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