B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Richard J.Schwartz (Chair) has been dean of the Schools of Engineering at Purdue University since July 1995. He has been on the faculty at Purdue since 1964 and has served as a consultant to a number of corporations, both large and small. Dr. Schwartz served as the chairman of the Science and Technology Advisory Committee for the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He serves on the Advisory Committee for the National Center for Photovoltaics and has served on the Board of Directors of the National Electrical Engineering Department Heads Association and on the International Committee for the European Union’s Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference. He has served as general chairman of the 23rd Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Photovoltaic Specialists Conference and as a member of the International Committee for the World Conference on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion. In 1987, Dr. Schwartz was named a fellow of the IEEE for his research work on the analysis, design, and development of high-intensity silicon solar cells. In 1998, he received the IEEE William Cherry Award for his contributions to the field of photovoltaics. He received the B.S.E.E. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1957 and the S.M.E.E. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959 and 1962, respectively. While a graduate student, he was one of eight founders of Energy Conversion, Inc., a manufacturer of thermoelectric materials, devices, and systems. He served as vice president of engineering at Energy Conversion, Inc., where he developed new techniques for the growth of single-crystal quaternary thermoelectric materials and high-performance thermoelectric heat pump modules.

Mary L.Bowden is currently visiting professor in the department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland, affiliated with the Space Systems Laboratory. Her research interests include assembly of structures in extravehicular assembly, large space structures, and the dynamics of space structures. She has been employed in the area of solar array design and material selection by the Able Engineering Company (AEC). While employed by AEC, Dr. Bowden worked in design and test support analysis for deployable structures and other space mechanisms. She has also worked for the American Rocket Company and American Composite Technology in the areas of dynamic structural model development and smart structures. Dr. Bowden graduated with Sc.D. and M.S. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a B.A. from Cornell University. She was named Space Educator of the Year in 1995 by the Western Spaceport Technological and Educational Council and awarded a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Group Achievement Award for the Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA (EASE) Flight Experiment. Dr. Bowden was awarded a Zonta Amelia



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Laying the Foundation for Space Solar Power: An Assessment of NASA’s Space Solar Power Investment Strategy B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Richard J.Schwartz (Chair) has been dean of the Schools of Engineering at Purdue University since July 1995. He has been on the faculty at Purdue since 1964 and has served as a consultant to a number of corporations, both large and small. Dr. Schwartz served as the chairman of the Science and Technology Advisory Committee for the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory. He serves on the Advisory Committee for the National Center for Photovoltaics and has served on the Board of Directors of the National Electrical Engineering Department Heads Association and on the International Committee for the European Union’s Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference. He has served as general chairman of the 23rd Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) Photovoltaic Specialists Conference and as a member of the International Committee for the World Conference on Photovoltaic Energy Conversion. In 1987, Dr. Schwartz was named a fellow of the IEEE for his research work on the analysis, design, and development of high-intensity silicon solar cells. In 1998, he received the IEEE William Cherry Award for his contributions to the field of photovoltaics. He received the B.S.E.E. from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1957 and the S.M.E.E. and Sc.D. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959 and 1962, respectively. While a graduate student, he was one of eight founders of Energy Conversion, Inc., a manufacturer of thermoelectric materials, devices, and systems. He served as vice president of engineering at Energy Conversion, Inc., where he developed new techniques for the growth of single-crystal quaternary thermoelectric materials and high-performance thermoelectric heat pump modules. Mary L.Bowden is currently visiting professor in the department of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Maryland, affiliated with the Space Systems Laboratory. Her research interests include assembly of structures in extravehicular assembly, large space structures, and the dynamics of space structures. She has been employed in the area of solar array design and material selection by the Able Engineering Company (AEC). While employed by AEC, Dr. Bowden worked in design and test support analysis for deployable structures and other space mechanisms. She has also worked for the American Rocket Company and American Composite Technology in the areas of dynamic structural model development and smart structures. Dr. Bowden graduated with Sc.D. and M.S. degrees from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and a B.A. from Cornell University. She was named Space Educator of the Year in 1995 by the Western Spaceport Technological and Educational Council and awarded a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Group Achievement Award for the Experimental Assembly of Structures in EVA (EASE) Flight Experiment. Dr. Bowden was awarded a Zonta Amelia

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Laying the Foundation for Space Solar Power: An Assessment of NASA’s Space Solar Power Investment Strategy Earhart Fellowship and a DuPont fellowship during her tenure at MIT. Hubert P.Davis has been an independent consultant since 1985 performing systems engineering and integration studies. His clients have included the NASA Johnson Space Center, the Large Scale Programs Institute, the University of Texas, United Technologies, the Boeing Company, Rocketdyne, NASA Langley Research Center, and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. In 1980, Mr. Davis founded Eagle Engineering, Inc., in Houston, Texas, a consulting company coupling the experience of Apollo Program leaders with outstanding recent graduates. Throughout the 1970s, Mr. Davis managed Future Programs for the NASA Johnson Space Center, where he developed the Inertial Upper Stage and solid rocket concepts and established the early NASA studies of the space solar power satellite concept. Throughout the 1960s, Mr. Davis had a lead engineering role in the design and development of power and propulsion systems for the Apollo Lunar Landing program. Mr. Davis currently maintains a leadership role in the development of space solar power system concepts. Richard L.Kline is president of Klintech, a technical consulting company. He is also president and chief executive officer of United Satellite Launch Services, a project to convert Russian missiles to provide scientific research and commercial satellite launch services. Mr. Kline was employed by the Grumman Corporation from 1956 until retiring in 1991. He served as vice president and deputy director, Grumman Space Station Program Support Division. Previously he served as program vice president for civil systems and led Grumman’s work in space solar power station concept design. He also initiated and led Grumman’s participation in space commercialization. Mr. Kline was employed at NASA, Washington, D.C., from 1992 until 1997 in a number of positions, including directing the Interagency National Facilities Study. He was commended by the Vice President for his contributions to reinventing government and received the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for his leadership. In 1997, he joined ANSER as vice president, international activities, and led ANSER’s work to promote mutually beneficial scientific and commercial international partnerships in space, primarily with Russia. Mr. Kline has been elected fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the American Astronomical Society, the British Royal Aeronautical Society, the British Interplanetary Society, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. He is a licensed professional engineer in New York and Virginia. Mr. Kline is an affiliate professor at George Mason University and is a member of its School for Computational Science Advisory Board. He is a co-chair of the International Astronautical Federation’s World Space Congress 2002 Technical Program Committee. Mr. Kline received AIAA’s von Braun Space Management Medal and was elected to the International Academy of Astronautics. Molly K.Macauley is a senior fellow with Resources for the Future (RFF), Washington, D.C. She has been Director of Academic Programs at RFF since 1996. Since 1983, Dr. Macauley’s research at RFF has included the areas of public finance, energy economics, regulation of toxic substances, environmental economics, advanced materials economics, the value of information, and economics and policy issues of outer space. Dr. Macauley’s space research includes the valuation of nonpriced space resources, the design of incentive arrangements to improve space resource use, and the appropriate relationship between public and private endeavors in space research, development, and commercial enterprise. Dr. Macauley has been a visiting professor at Johns Hopkins University, Department of Economics, and at Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public Affairs. Dr. Macauley testified before Congress on the Commercial Space Act of 1997, the Omnibus Space Commercialization Act of 1996, the Space Business Incentives Act of 1996, and space commercialization. Dr. Macauley has served on many national-level committees and panels, including the congressionally mandated Economic Study of Space Solar Power (chair); the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Board on Physics and Astronomy, Helium Reserve Committee; the NRC Space Studies Board Steering Group on Space Applications and Commercialization; and the NRC Space Studies Board Task Force on Priorities in Space Research. Dr. Macauley has published extensively over the past 16 years, with more than 70 journal articles, books, and chapters of books. Dr. Macauley serves on the Board of Directors of Women in Aerospace and has served as president of the Thomas Jefferson Public Policy Program, College of William and Mary.

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Laying the Foundation for Space Solar Power: An Assessment of NASA’s Space Solar Power Investment Strategy Lee D.Peterson is an associate professor of aerospace engineering sciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He has been an associate professor or assistant professor at the University of Colorado since 1991. Dr. Peterson is also director of the McDonnell-Douglas Aerospace Structural Dynamics and Control Laboratory and is a member of the multidisciplinary Center for Aerospace Structures. His principal area of research is in high-precision deployable spacecraft structures for use in optical telescopes and interferometers. His research group has experimentally characterized and modeled a new class of nonlinear mechanics that limits the stability of such space structures at nanometer levels of motion. He has also made research contributions in experimental structural dynamics, system identification, parameter identification joint modeling, and active structural control. Dr. Peterson is also actively involved in the University of Colorado’s new undergraduate aerospace curriculum and served as the technical director of the Integrated Teaching and Learning Laboratory from 1995 to 1997. From 1989 to 1991, Dr. Peterson was assistant professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at Purdue University. From 1987 to 1989, he was a member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Kitt C.Reinhardt is an electrical engineer conducting photovoltaic device research and development in the Space Vehicles Directorate of the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Dr. Reinhardt was the Air Force nominee and the year 2000 winner of the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement, an early career award based on Dr. Reinhardt’s pioneering work in the development of high-efficiency, multijunction solar cells as well as ultralightweight flexible thin-film photovoltaics for next-generation space systems. Dr. Reinhardt led the successful development and commercialization of the first 25 percent-efficient space solar cell, as well as the invention and current development of the first 30–35 percent efficient space solar cell. In addition, he has been instrumental in several revolutionary areas, such as thin-film photovoltaics and advanced thermal-to-electric conversion. Most recently, Dr. Reinhardt, together with Hong Hou from Sandia National Laboratories, invented an entirely new approach capable of achieving 35–40 percent solar-to-electric conversion with a four-junction solar cell design. A patent for the device was granted in August 1999. R.Rhoads (Rody) Stephenson retired from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in 1998, where he had been deputy director of the JPL technology program since 1991 and acting director since 1995. The technology program included all of JPL’s technology development efforts, including robotics and its space power work. In this capacity, Dr. Stephenson was involved in many studies of space power beaming to Earth. He also worked, in conjunction with Langley Research Center, on large space structures and the JPL program on control-structures interaction, providing a technology base for the space interferometer project. Between 1981 and 1991, Dr. Stephenson was manager of the Electronics and Control Division at JPL. The division included the power section, which had responsibility for all forms of space power, including solar power, and it participated in solar cell development and testing and in the solar power beam transmission studies of that period. Most recently in his 36-year career at JPL, the laboratory turned to Dr. Stephenson to serve as a member of the Galileo and Cassini Review Boards, to chair the Mars Pathfinder Board, and to lead the internal failure Review Board for the Mars Observer mission. Dava Newman, Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board liaison to the Committee for the Assessment of NASA’s Space Solar Power Technical Investment Strategy, is an associate professor of aeronautics and astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a MacVicar faculty fellow. She conducts multidisciplinary efforts combining aerospace bioengineering, human-in-the-loop dynamics and control modeling, biomechanics, human interface technology, life sciences, and systems analysis and design. Dr. Newman served as a member of the NRC Committee on Advanced Technology for Human Support in Space and the Committee on Engineering Challenges to the Long-Term Operation of the International Space Station.