Appendix

Committee Member and Staff Biographical Summaries

Committee Members

PHILIP S.BRACHMAN, M.D. (Chair), is professor, Department of International Health, Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH), Emory University. He joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1954 and worked in epidemiology and training until his retirement in 1986. He held positions in the Bureau of Epidemiology and then the Epidemiology Program Office, which he directed from 1970 to 1981. Dr. Brachman also directed the Field Epidemiology Training Program until 1986. He subsequently joined the RSPH faculty and is primarily involved in teaching regular courses in epidemiology and biostatistics in Atlanta and overseas. Dr. Brachman’s current research activities include public health surveillance and nosocomial infections. He also directs the Hubert H.Humphrey Fellowship Program, a scholarship program financed by the U.S. government for foreign professionals to study and work for 1 year in the United States.

RUTH L.BERKELMAN, M.D., is professor, Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, with a joint appointment in the Department of International Health. Dr. Berkelman joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1980 as an epidemic intelligence officer, becoming director of the Division of Surveillance and Epidemiologic Studies and later directing AIDS surveillance activities for the United States. Promoted to assistant surgeon general in the U.S. Public Health Service, she was the deputy director of the



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Perspectives on the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System: A Program Review Appendix Committee Member and Staff Biographical Summaries Committee Members PHILIP S.BRACHMAN, M.D. (Chair), is professor, Department of International Health, Rollins School of Public Health (RSPH), Emory University. He joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in 1954 and worked in epidemiology and training until his retirement in 1986. He held positions in the Bureau of Epidemiology and then the Epidemiology Program Office, which he directed from 1970 to 1981. Dr. Brachman also directed the Field Epidemiology Training Program until 1986. He subsequently joined the RSPH faculty and is primarily involved in teaching regular courses in epidemiology and biostatistics in Atlanta and overseas. Dr. Brachman’s current research activities include public health surveillance and nosocomial infections. He also directs the Hubert H.Humphrey Fellowship Program, a scholarship program financed by the U.S. government for foreign professionals to study and work for 1 year in the United States. RUTH L.BERKELMAN, M.D., is professor, Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, with a joint appointment in the Department of International Health. Dr. Berkelman joined the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in 1980 as an epidemic intelligence officer, becoming director of the Division of Surveillance and Epidemiologic Studies and later directing AIDS surveillance activities for the United States. Promoted to assistant surgeon general in the U.S. Public Health Service, she was the deputy director of the

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Perspectives on the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System: A Program Review National Center for Infectious Diseases from 1992 to 1997 and then was senior adviser to the director of the CDC until 2000. She helped found the Division of Public Health of the American Society for Microbiology and currently serves on the Emerging Infections Committee of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. She is a trustee of Princeton University. DONALD S.BURKE, M.D., is professor, Department of International Health and director, Center for Immunization Research, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Previously he worked at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, where he served as chief of the Department of Virus Diseases and Director of the Division of Retrovirology. He has also served as director for the U.S. Military HIV/AIDS Research Program and chief of the Department of Virology for the Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences in Bangkok, Thailand. His interests include the control of human epidemic viral diseases, the study of tropical viral diseases such as dengue and encephalitis, molecular epidemiology, and the evolution of human viruses. He served on the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Roundtable for the Development of Drugs and Vaccines Against AIDS and is past president of the American Society of Tropical Medicine. Dr. Burke recently chaired the NRC Committee on Climate, Ecosystems, Infectious Diseases, and Human Health. KATHLEEN F.GENSHEIMER, M.D., M.P.H., is state epidemiologist, Bureau of Health, Maine Department of Human Services. Previously she served as an epidemic intelligence officer with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and as a commissioned corps officer in the U.S. Public Health Service. She was a member of the executive committee of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists from 1989 to 1999 and served as secretary of that organization from 1993 to 1999. She was the chair of the American Society for Microbiology’s Public Health Division Y in 2000. Dr. Gensheimer currently serves as a consultant to the Interagency Group on Influenza Pandemic Preparedness, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS); as a member of the National Advisory Council for the Elimination of Tuberculosis, DHHS; and as a member of the Emerging Infections Committee, Infectious Diseases Society of America. C.JAMES HOSPEDALES, M.B.B.S., F.F.P.H.M., E.I.S., is director, Caribbean Epidemiology Center, Pan American Health Organization, World Health Organization (West Indies). Dr. Hospedales has extensive experience in the surveillance and control of disease, in the United Kingdom, the United States, and the Caribbean. He has extensive experience in the planning, implementation, and evaluation of national and international surveillance systems (e.g., physician sentinels, laboratory networks,

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Perspectives on the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System: A Program Review and human immunodeficiency virus infection/AIDS). He has served as the leader of team investigations of outbreaks of cholera in Guyana (1992) and Legionnaires’ disease in Antigua (1996) and as chairman of the Caribbean Workshop on Control and Elimination of Leprosy in Trinidad (1991) and has provided disease surveillance following hurricanes Hugo (1989) and Luis and Marilyn (1996), the volcanic eruption at Montserrat (1995), and the flood disaster in Guyana (1996). He also participated in the World Health Organization Consultation on Epidemiologic and Statistical Methods of Rapid Health Assessment, held in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1990. ANN MARIE KIMBALL, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.P., is associate professor, Health Services and Epidemiology, Adjunct in Medicine, University of Washington. She also serves as the director and graduate program coordinator, M.P.H. Program, School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of Washington. Dr. Kimball has devoted her career to studying health issues and has worked in numerous positions in the United States and abroad. Her research interests are primarily in international health, trade, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection/ AIDS, emerging infections, maternal and child health, and health informatics. She has previously served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Forum on Emerging Infections, as a member of the Department of Health Emerging and Reemerging Diseases Strategic Planning Task Force, as regional adviser for the Pan American Health Organization in HIV infection/AIDS, and as the chair of the National Alliance of State and Territorial AIDS Directors in the United States. She has served as a U.S. delegate to the American Pacific Economic Council Industry, Science & Technology Working Group. GUÉNAËL R.RODIER, M.D., is director, Department of Communicable Disease Surveillance and Response, World Health Organization (WHO; Geneva, Switzerland). His work experience also includes service at the International Health Program, University of Maryland at Baltimore, and as an infectious disease epidemiologist, U.S. Naval Medical Research Unit 3 (Cairo, Egypt). Dr. Rodier possesses disease-specific experience in filovirus hemorrhagic fevers (caused by Ebola, Marburg, and Rift Valley fever viruses), human immunodeficiency virus infection/ AIDS, cholera, dengue, hantavirus infection, and many others. He has been actively involved in the development of new WHO strategies and tools for communicable disease surveillance; has led and managed medical teams in private practice, the U.S. Navy, and the WHO; and has coordinated international field teams conducting research projects, outbreak investigations, and assessments of national surveillance systems.

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Perspectives on the Department of Defense Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System: A Program Review RONALD K.ST. JOHN, M.D., M.P.H., is executive director, Center for Emergency Preparedness and Response, Health Canada, and associate professor of medicine, University of Ottawa Medical School. Dr. St. John has also served as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, as the deputy director of the National AIDS Program Office, and as a program coordinator for the Health Situation and Trend Assessment Program, Pan American Health Organization. He is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Public Health Association, the International Epidemiology Association, and the Commissioned Officers Association, among others. Dr. St. John has received many honors and awards, including the Pan American Health Organization Medal for Outstanding Management and the U.S. Public Health Service Distinguished Service Medal. He is also a member of the Canadian Committee to Advise on Tropical Medicine and Travel and the Committee to Plan the HIV/AIDS Satellite Prevention Conference for the XIth International Conference on AIDS. Study Staff RICHARD N.MILLER, M.D., M.P.H., is director, Medical FollowUp Agency, Institute of Medicine. He possesses an extensive background in preventive medicine and military medicine and has served as public health officer in the Canal Zone, Republic of Panama; in Thailand; and in Germany; as well as serving as director, Division of Preventive Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR). Dr. Miller is a member of numerous professional societies and is also a member of the General Preventive Medicine Residency Advisory Committee, WRAIR. HEATHER C.O’MAONAIGH has served as a staff member with the Institute of Medicine since 1998. She holds a master’s degree in demography from Georgetown University and a bachelor of science in sociology from Western Washington University.