Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff

Janet L.Norwood (Chair) is author of Organizing to Count: Change in the Federal Statistical System (1995). Previously, she served as commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the U.S. Department of Labor. She has written articles and monographs on statistical policy and on unemployment, price, and wage statistics, and has testified often on these issues before congressional committees. She has been a member of the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council and its Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 and Beyond, is chair of the Advisory Committee for the Leading Indicators, and is a member of advisory committees at the National Science Foundation, at several statistical agencies, and at universities. She has received honorary LL.D. degrees from Florida International and Carnegie Mellon Universities. She has a B.A. degree from Rutgers University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University.

Robert M.Bell is a researcher at the AT&T Laboratories. He became a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on National Statistics in October 2001 and previously served on its Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies. Earlier, he worked at the RAND Corporation, where he examined and coauthored a number of studies on social policy issues. His work with RAND’s Child Policy Project included research on such topics as prenatal substance abuse, adolescent drug use and the importance of social bonding among different ethnic groups, and the effects of the availability of condoms in a high school in Los Angeles. Dr. Bell earned a B.S. in mathematics from Harvey Mudd College and an M.S. from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. from Stanford University, both in statistics.

Norman M.Bradburn is the assistant director of the National Science Foundation for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences. Formerly, he held positions as a senior vice president for research of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, director of NORC, and provost of



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The 2000 Census: Interim Assessment Biographical Sketches of Panel Members and Staff Janet L.Norwood (Chair) is author of Organizing to Count: Change in the Federal Statistical System (1995). Previously, she served as commissioner of the Bureau of Labor Statistics in the U.S. Department of Labor. She has written articles and monographs on statistical policy and on unemployment, price, and wage statistics, and has testified often on these issues before congressional committees. She has been a member of the Committee on National Statistics of the National Research Council and its Panel on Census Requirements in the Year 2000 and Beyond, is chair of the Advisory Committee for the Leading Indicators, and is a member of advisory committees at the National Science Foundation, at several statistical agencies, and at universities. She has received honorary LL.D. degrees from Florida International and Carnegie Mellon Universities. She has a B.A. degree from Rutgers University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University. Robert M.Bell is a researcher at the AT&T Laboratories. He became a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on National Statistics in October 2001 and previously served on its Panel on Alternative Census Methodologies. Earlier, he worked at the RAND Corporation, where he examined and coauthored a number of studies on social policy issues. His work with RAND’s Child Policy Project included research on such topics as prenatal substance abuse, adolescent drug use and the importance of social bonding among different ethnic groups, and the effects of the availability of condoms in a high school in Los Angeles. Dr. Bell earned a B.S. in mathematics from Harvey Mudd College and an M.S. from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. from Stanford University, both in statistics. Norman M.Bradburn is the assistant director of the National Science Foundation for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences. Formerly, he held positions as a senior vice president for research of the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) at the University of Chicago, director of NORC, and provost of

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The 2000 Census: Interim Assessment the University. In his work as a social psychologist he has focused on the areas of survey and questionnaire design and related fields. He is also a past member of the Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education and the Committee on National Statistics and chaired the Panel to Evaluate Alternative Census Methodologies. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the International Statistical Institute, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the American Association for Public Opinion Research and the World Association for Public Opinion Research. He received B.A. degrees from the University of Chicago and Oxford University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical and social psychology from Harvard University. Lawrence D.Brown is the Miers Bush professor of the Department of Statistics at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences. He is also a member the National Research Council’s Committee on National Statistics and a former member of the National Research Council’s Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and its Board on Mathematical Sciences. He has been a critic of the Census Bureau’s plans to incorporate sampling in the census. He received a B.S. from the California Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. from Cornell University. Constance E.Citro is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics. She is a former vice president and deputy director of Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., and was an American Statistical Association/National Science Foundation research fellow at the U.S. Census Bureau. For the committee, she has served as study director for numerous projects, including the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas, the Panel on Poverty and Family Assistance, the Panel to Evaluate the Survey of Income and Program Participation, the Panel to Evaluate Microsimulation Models for Social Welfare Programs, and the Panel on Decennial Census Methodology. Her research has focused on the quality and accessibility of large, complex microdata files, as well as analysis related to income and poverty measurement. She is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. She received a B.A. degree from the University of Rochester and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in political science from Yale University. Michael L.Cohen is a senior program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as the study director for the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods and staff to the Panel to Review the 2000 Census. He previously assisted the Panel on Estimates of Poverty for Small Geographic Areas. He also directed the Panel on Statistical Methods for Testing and Evaluating Defense Systems. Formerly, he was a mathematical statistician at the Energy Information Administration, an assistant professor in the School

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The 2000 Census: Interim Assessment of Public Affairs at the University of Maryland, and a visiting lecturer at the Department of Statistics, Princeton University. His general area of research is the use of statistics in public policy, with particular interest in census undercount, model validation, and robust estimation. He received a B.S. degree in mathematics from the University of Michigan and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in statistics from Stanford University. Daniel L.Cork is a program officer for the Committee on National Statistics, currently assisting the Panel to Review the 2000 Census and serving as co-study director of the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods. His research interests include quantitative criminology (particularly space-time dynamics in homicide), Bayesian statistics, and statistics in sports. He holds a B.S. degree in statistics from George Washington University and an M.S. in statistics and a joint Ph.D. in statistics and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. William F. Eddy is professor of statistics at Carnegie Mellon University. His research concentrates on the computational and graphical aspects of statistics. He is particularly interested in dynamic graphics for the analysis and presentation of data, especially those dynamic graphical displays that cannot be rendered interactively. He is a former member of the Committee on National Statistics; a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the Royal Statistical Society; and an elected member of the International Statistical Institute. He was the founding coeditor of CHANCE magazine and is the founding editor of the Journal of Computational and Graphical Statistics. He has an A.B. degree from Princeton University, and M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D. degrees from Yale University. Robert M.Hauser is Vilas research professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he has directed the Center for Demography and Ecology and the Institute for Research on Poverty. He currently directs the Center for Demography of Health and Aging. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the National Academy of Education, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Statistical Association, the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served on the National Research Council’s Committee on National Statistics, Commission on Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, and Board on Testing and Assessment. His current research interests include trends in educational progression and social mobility in the United States among racial and ethnic groups, the uses of educational assessment as a policy tool, the effects of families on social and economic inequality, and changes in socioeconomic standing, health, and well-being across the life course. He received a B.A. degree from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan.

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The 2000 Census: Interim Assessment Ingram Olkin is professor of statistics and education at Stanford University. Before moving to Stanford, he was on the faculties of Michigan State University and the University of Minnesota, where he served as chair of the Department of Statistics. He has cowritten a number of books and been an editor of the Annals of Statistics and an associate editor of Psychometrika, the Journal of Educational Statistics, and the Journal of the American Statistical Association. He has also served as chair of the National Research Council’s Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics and as president of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. He has received an honorary D.Sci from DeMontfort University; a Lifetime Contribution Award from the American Psychological Association, Division 5; and a Wilks Medal from the American Statistical Association. His recent interest has been methodology for research synthesis, and he has published both theoretical and applied papers in medicine. He is currently a fellow in the Primary Care Outcomes Research Program. He received a Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of North Carolina. D.Bruce Petrie is vice-president and chief operating officer at the Canadian Institute for Health Information. From 1984 to 1999, he was the assistant chief statistician of the Social, Institutions and Labour Statistics Field at Statistics Canada, where he was responsible for conducting the census in Canada. Petrie has held several positions at Statistics Canada, including director general of the Household Surveys Branch from 1978 to 1984 and director of the Labour Force Survey (the Canadian equivalent of the Current Population Survey) from 1973 to 1978. He previously served as a member of the Committee on National Statistics’ Panel to Evaluate Alternative Census Methodologies. He has a bachelor of commerce degree from Dalhousie University and an M.B.A. from the University of Western Ontario. Michele Ver Ploeg is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics, currently serving as the study director for the Panel on Data and Methods for Measuring the Effects of Changes in Social Welfare Programs and the Panel to Evaluate the USDAs Methodology for Estimating Eligibility and Participation for the WIC Program. Her research interests include the effects of social policies on families and children, the outcomes of children who experience poverty and changes in family composition, and individuals’ education attainment choices. She received a B.A. in economics from Central College and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in consumer economics and housing from Cornell University. Meyer Zitter is an independent demographic consultant. Formerly, he was chief of the Census Bureau’s Population Division and also served as assistant director for international programs. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the International Statistical Institute and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. He has a B.B.A. degree from City College of New York.