APPENDIX
Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff

Donald I. Barfield is deputy director at WestEd, a nonprofit research, development, and service agency dedicated to improving education and other opportunities for children, youth, and adults. As a deputy director, Mr. Barfield is responsible for overseeing all research and development, evaluation, and technical assistance proposals from WestEd and for developing new lines of work within the agency, acquisitions, and key business partnerships. In addition to his work in leading WestEd’s resource development and strategic planning efforts, he supervises WestEd’s mathematics and science program, the National Center for Improving Science Education, and the technology in education program. Mr. Barfield has presented testimony before Congress on student assessment issues and the use of test data in schools, has participated as a contractor and advisor to the California State Department of Education on statewide assessment and accountability systems since 1989 and is currently a court-appointed expert in the San Francisco Unified School District’s desegregation case. Previously, he helped develop and establish the Bay Area Annenberg Project, directed Far West Laboratory’s Center for Teaching and Learning, and served as assistant superintendent for research, testing, and evaluation in the San Francisco Unified School District. He earned an M.A. in sociology from Harvard University.

Robert F. Boruch is university chair professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Statistics Department of the Wharton School at the



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Scientific Research in Education APPENDIX Biographical Sketches, Committee Members and Staff Donald I. Barfield is deputy director at WestEd, a nonprofit research, development, and service agency dedicated to improving education and other opportunities for children, youth, and adults. As a deputy director, Mr. Barfield is responsible for overseeing all research and development, evaluation, and technical assistance proposals from WestEd and for developing new lines of work within the agency, acquisitions, and key business partnerships. In addition to his work in leading WestEd’s resource development and strategic planning efforts, he supervises WestEd’s mathematics and science program, the National Center for Improving Science Education, and the technology in education program. Mr. Barfield has presented testimony before Congress on student assessment issues and the use of test data in schools, has participated as a contractor and advisor to the California State Department of Education on statewide assessment and accountability systems since 1989 and is currently a court-appointed expert in the San Francisco Unified School District’s desegregation case. Previously, he helped develop and establish the Bay Area Annenberg Project, directed Far West Laboratory’s Center for Teaching and Learning, and served as assistant superintendent for research, testing, and evaluation in the San Francisco Unified School District. He earned an M.A. in sociology from Harvard University. Robert F. Boruch is university chair professor in the Graduate School of Education and the Statistics Department of the Wharton School at the

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Scientific Research in Education University of Pennsylvania. A fellow of the American Statistical Association, he has received awards for his work on research methods and policy from the American Educational Research Association, the American Evaluation Association, and the Policy Studies Association. He is the author of nearly 150 scholarly papers and author or editor of a dozen books on topics ranging from evaluation of AIDS prevention programs and social experiments to assuming confidentiality of data in social research. His most recent book is titled Randomized Experiments for Planning and Evaluation: A Practical Guide, 1997, published by Sage. He earned a Ph.D. in psychology from Iowa State University. Jere Confrey is professor of education, University of Texas at Austin. She directs the Systemic Research Collaborative for Mathematics, Science, and Technology (SYRCE) and cofounded the UTeach teacher preparation program for grades 4-12. She is vice chair of the Mathematical Sciences Education Board of the National Academy of Sciences. She was the founder of the SummerMath program for young women at Mount Holyoke College and cofounder of SummerMath for Teachers. Her research focuses on urban school reform, systemic change models, and children’s understanding of multiplication, division, ratio and trigonometry. She is coauthor of the software Function Probe, Class Tab, and of sets of interactive diagrams for illustrating core mathematical ideas. She has served as vice president of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, chair of the SIG-Research in Mathematics Education, and on the editorial boards of the Journal for Research in Mathematics Educational and the International Journal for Computers in Mathematics Learning. She has been a member of the Department of Education’s Expert Panel on Technology, and has taught school at the elementary, secondary, and postsecondary levels. She received a Ph.D. in mathematics education from Cornell University. Rudolph Crew is the director of school reform initiatives at the Stupski Family Foundation in Mill Valley, California. He previously served as the first executive director of the University of Washington’s new Institute for K-12 Leadership, and affiliate professor of leadership and policy studies in the College of Education. Prior to joining the University of Washington, Crew was chancellor of New York Public Schools for 4 years. He has also served as superintendent of the Tacoma Public Schools and the Sacramento

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Scientific Research in Education City Unified School District and has held various other teaching and administrative positions in California and Boston. He holds M.A. and Ed.D. degrees from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. Robert L. DeHaan is professor of cell biology, emeritus at Emory Medical School and adjunct professor in the Division of Educational Studies at Emory University. He currently directs a precollege science education effort, the Elementary Science Education Partners (ESEP) Program, which supplies undergraduate “science partners” and professional development to elementary teachers of the Atlanta Public School and neighboring Fulton County school districts. Previously, he was on the faculties of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, the Johns Hopkins University, and the Emory School of Medicine, focusing on the biophysical differentiation of the embryonic heart. He has published two books and over 100 research papers in cellular science and embryology, and he has trained over 40 graduate students and post-doctoral fellows. In 1998 he received the first Bruce Alberts Award from the American Society of Cell Biologists for distinguished contributions to science education. In addition to his work in bench science and precollege education, he founded and was the first director of the Emory Center for Ethics in Public Policy and the Professions and is now faculty scholar at the Center. He received a Ph.D. from the University of California at Los Angeles. Margaret Eisenhart is professor of educational anthropology and research methodology in the School of Education, University of Colorado at Boulder. Previously, she taught at the College of Education at Virginia Tech. Her research and publications have focused on bringing the perspective of anthropology to bear on current U.S. educational issues, including most notably the influences of gender and ethnicity on educational experiences and achievement. She has also written extensively about applications of ethnographic research methods in educational research. She is coauthor of three books and author or co-author of more than 50 articles and chapters. She founded and directs the Center for Youth in Science, Culture and NewMedia (cy.Scan) at the University of Colorado. She received a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

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Scientific Research in Education Jack McFarlin Fletcher is a professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Texas-Houston Health Science Center and associate director of the Center for Academic and Reading Skills. He previously directed the School Problems Clinic at the University of Texas-Houston. For the past 20 years, Dr. Fletcher, a child neuropsychologist, has completed research on many aspects of the development of reading, language, and other cognitive skills in children. He has worked extensively on issues related to learning and attention problems, including definition and classification, neurobiological correlates, intervention, and, most recently, the development of literacy skills in Spanish-speaking children and bilingual children. He served on and chaired the mental retardation/developmental disabilities study section of the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development and is a former member of its maternal and child health study section. He chaired a committee on children with persistent reading disability for the Houston Independent School District (HISD) and served on a task force on reading for HISD. He earned a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Florida. Eugene E. Garcia is professor of education at the University of California, Berkeley. He previously served as a faculty member at the University of Utah; the University of California, Santa Barbara; Arizona State University; and the University of California, Santa Cruz. He has served previously as a national research center director and as an academic department chair and dean. He has published extensively in the area of language teaching and bilingual development, authoring or coauthoring over 150 articles and book chapters, along with eight book-length volumes. He served as a senior officer and director of the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs in the U.S. Department of Education from 1993 to 1995, and is conducting research in the area of effective schooling for linguistically and culturally diverse student populations. He received a B.A. from the University of Utah in psychology, and a Ph.D. in human development from the University of Kansas. Norman Hackerman is chairman of the Scientific Advisory Board at the Robert A. Welch Foundation and president emeritus and distinguished professor emeritus of chemistry at Rice University. He spent 25 years at The University of Texas, Austin, where he joined the faculty as an assistant

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Scientific Research in Education professor of chemistry in 1945 and progressed to president in 1967. He taught chemistry at Loyola College and Virginia Tech, and worked as a research chemist for Colloid Corporation, Kellex Corporation, and the U.S. Coast Guard. He was a member of the National Science Board from 1968 to 1980, and its chairman from 1975 to 1980. He was the editor of the Journal of the Electrochemical Society from 1969 to 1989. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as numerous scientific organizations. He is author or coauthor of 226 publications. He has served on the NRC’s Committee on Science Education K-12 since 1996, and is also a member of its Science and Technology Editorial Board. He received a B.A. and a Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University. Eric Hanushek is the Paul and Jean Hanna senior fellow on education policy at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research concentrates on applied public finance and public policy analysis with special emphasis on education issues. He had prior academic appointments at the University of Rochester, Yale University, and the U.S. Air Force Academy. From 1983 to 1985, he was deputy director of the Congressional Budget Office. He has published numerous books, including Making Schools Work: Improving Performance and Controlling Costs, and articles on a variety of subjects in professional journals. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Robert Hauser is Vilas research professor and Samuel A. Stouffer professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His current research includes the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study—a study of aging, the life course, and social stratification—and is also studying national trends and differentials in educational attainment, school dropout, and grade retention. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the National Academy of Education. He served as co-principal investigator on the NRC evaluation of the Voluntary National Tests and chaired the Committee on Appropriate Uses of High Stakes Tests. He received a B.A. in economics from the University of Chicago and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Michigan.

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Scientific Research in Education Paul W. Holland is the Frederick M. Lord chair in measurement and statistics at the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, NJ. Prior to rejoining ETS in 2000, he was professor in the Graduate School of Education and Department of Statistics at the University of California, Berkeley. He is a member of the NRC’s Board on Testing and Assessment, and has served on the Design and Analysis Committee for the National Assessment of Educational Progress and as an advisor to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. He chaired the NRC panel on Equivalency and Linkage of Educational Tests. His research interests include applications of statistics to the social and behavioral sciences, the analysis of categorical data, causal inference in non-experimental research, psychometrics, latent variable models, and test linking. His contributions to psychometrics include a book on test equating and another on differential item functioning. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He is a past president of the Psychometric Society and in 2000 he was awarded the American Educational Research Association/American College Testing Program’s E.F. Lindquist Award. He earned an M.S. and a Ph.D. in statistics from Stanford University. Ellen Condliffe Lagemann is president of the Spencer Foundation and on leave as professor of history and education at New York University. An historian of education, her professional life has been devoted to investigation of the field of educational research and of philanthropy. She is the author or editor of nine books and countless reviews. Her most recent book, published by the University of Chicago Press in 2000, is An Elusive Science: The Troubling History of Education Research. Before joining the faculty of New York University as director of the Center for the Study of American Culture and Education and chair of the Department of Humanities and the Social Sciences in the School of Education, she taught at Teachers College and in the Department of History at Columbia University. She is a member of the National Academy of Education and has served as its president since 1998. Formerly, she was president of the History of Education Society, vice chair of the Board of Directors of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, and a board member of the Greenwall Foundation in New York City. In addition, she currently serves

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Scientific Research in Education on the board of the Markle and Russell Sage Foundations. A graduate of Smith College, she taught high school in New York before receiving an M.A. from Teachers College, Columbia University, and a Ph.D. from Columbia University. Denis C. Phillips is professor of education and (by courtesy) professor of philosophy at Stanford University, where he served as the School of Education’s associate dean for academic affairs from 1994 to 2001. Trained initially as a biologist and science teacher, he moved into philosophy of social science and the history of nineteenth and twentieth century thought, especially as it concerns the emergence of the biological and social sciences. He is a fellow of the International Academy of Education, a past president of the Philosophy of Education Society, and was a section editor of the International Encyclopedia of Education (2nd ed). His recent work has been focussed on defending the possibility of scientifically rigorous educational research in the light of contemporary criticisms; and he has given workshops on topics in philosophy of science for educational researchers in a number of countries worldwide. He also has been working on an analysis of constructivist thought in education, psychology, and philosophy. He has authored, coauthored, or edited 10 books and more than 100 journal articles and book and encyclopedia chapters. He has a Ph.D in philosophy of science and philosophy of education from the University of Melbourne in Australia. Richard J. Shavelson (chair) is a professor in the School of Education and the Department of Psychology (by courtesy) at Stanford University, and past dean of the School of Education. He is a member of the National Academy of Education and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Psychological Association, the American Psychological Society, and the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences. For more than 20 years, he has sought new techniques for measuring performance in ways that contribute to educational and workplace goals, exploring, for example, alternatives to multiple-choice tests in schools, on the job, and in the military. His recent research has focused on new assessment tools for science and mathematics achievement, measuring individual and group performance in science and mathematics;

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Scientific Research in Education statistically modeling performance assessment; and addressing policy and practice issues in measurement reform. He has chaired the NRC’s Board on Testing and Assessment. As professor of education and psychology at Stanford and as the dean of the School of Education, he implemented a wide-range plan for the school; created partnerships with the Stanford schools of business, law, engineering, and humanities and sciences; and increased links between the school and the local education and business communities. He has published several books, monographs, and more than 100 articles, reports, and chapters. He received a Ph.D. in educational psychology from Stanford University in 1971. Lisa Towne is a senior program officer in the NRC’s Center for Education and adjunct instructor of quantitative methods at Georgetown University’s Public Policy Institute. She has also worked for the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and the U.S. Department of Education Planning and Evaluation Service. She received an M.P.P. from Georgetown University. Carol H. Weiss is the Beatrice S. Whiting professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Education, where she teaches in the area of administration, planning, and social policy. Her courses include evaluation methods, research methods, using research as a strategy of change, and organizational decision making. She has published 11 books on evaluation and the uses of research and evaluation in policy making and more than 100 articles and book chapters. Her publications have been translated into German, French, Spanish, Portuguese, Thai, and Ukrainian. Her recent work is about the influences on educational policy making from ideology, interests, information, and institutional constraints. She has been a fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, a guest scholar at the Brookings Institution, a congressional fellow under the sponsorship of the American Sociological Association, a senior fellow at the U.S. Department of Education, and a member of several NRC panels. She is on editorial boards for Teachers College Record, the Journal of Educational Change, Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis, Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education and Development, American Behavioral Scientist, and others. She holds a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University.