Appendix B
Biographical Sketches

Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is professor of biostatistics and epidemiology, professor of medicine, professor of pharmacology, director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, and chair of the Graduate Group in Epidemiology & Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. His clinical training and research training are in internal medicine, clinical pharmacology, and epidemiology, with a major research interest in the field of pharmacoepidemiology. He holds editorial positions on numerous journals and has authored more than 300 original papers, as well as one of the first textbooks in the field. Dr. Strom has served as president of the International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology and as a member of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians. He is now on the Board of Directors for the American College of Epidemiology. He served on both the Medication Use Task Force of the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and the Drug Utilization Review Advisory Committee on the United States Pharmacopoeia Convention. He has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, the American Epidemiologic Society, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Institute of Medicine.

William E. Barlow, Ph.D., is a senior scientific investigator at the Center for Health Studies, the research arm of the consumer-governed nonprofit health care organization Group Health Cooperative. He is also research professor of biostatistics at the University of Washington. His scientific research interests are breast cancer screening and the safety and efficacy of child-



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The Anthrax Vaccine: Is it Safe? Does it Work? Appendix B Biographical Sketches Brian L. Strom, M.D., M.P.H. (Chair), is professor of biostatistics and epidemiology, professor of medicine, professor of pharmacology, director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, and chair of the Graduate Group in Epidemiology & Biostatistics at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. His clinical training and research training are in internal medicine, clinical pharmacology, and epidemiology, with a major research interest in the field of pharmacoepidemiology. He holds editorial positions on numerous journals and has authored more than 300 original papers, as well as one of the first textbooks in the field. Dr. Strom has served as president of the International Society of Pharmacoepidemiology and as a member of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physicians. He is now on the Board of Directors for the American College of Epidemiology. He served on both the Medication Use Task Force of the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations and the Drug Utilization Review Advisory Committee on the United States Pharmacopoeia Convention. He has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, the American Epidemiologic Society, the American Society for Clinical Investigation, and the Institute of Medicine. William E. Barlow, Ph.D., is a senior scientific investigator at the Center for Health Studies, the research arm of the consumer-governed nonprofit health care organization Group Health Cooperative. He is also research professor of biostatistics at the University of Washington. His scientific research interests are breast cancer screening and the safety and efficacy of child-

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The Anthrax Vaccine: Is it Safe? Does it Work? hood immunizations. His statistics interests include practice variation, influence diagnostics, surrogate outcomes, and efficient sampling procedures. Dr. Barlow’s work on immunization and vaccines has included work on a comprehensive collection of data on links between medical events and immunization. He directs the Statistical Coordinating Center for the National Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, funded by the National Cancer Institute. He is a member of the American Statistical Association, the Biometric Society, and the Society for Clinical Trials. Dan G. Blazer II, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is the J. P. Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, a professor of community and family medicine, and former dean of medical education at the Duke University School of Medicine. He is also adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. Dr. Blazer is the author or editor of more than 20 books and author or coauthor of more than 250 peer-reviewed articles on topics including depression, epidemiology, and liaison psychiatry. He has served on several Institute of Medicine committees and recently chaired the Committee on the Evaluation of the Department of Defense Clinical Evaluation Protocol. He is a fellow of the American College of Psychiatry and the American Psychiatric Association and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Linda D. Cowan, Ph.D., is the George Lynn Cross Research Professor in the Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Her interests include cardiovascular disease and the relative importance of different risk factors in men and women, neurological disorders, perinatal epidemiology, and the application of epidemiology in the legal setting. Her recent research includes evaluating risk factors for abnormal fetal growth, identifying cardiovascular disease risk factors in Native American populations, and evaluating multiple approaches to surveillance of hemophilia in Oklahoma. Dr. Cowan is an elected member of the American Epidemiological Society and is the recipient of several teaching awards. She has served on the Institute of Medicine Vaccine Safety Forum and on the Committee to Review the Adverse Consequences of Pertussis and Rubella Vaccines. Kathryn M. Edwards, M.D., is professor of pediatrics and associate director of the Division of Pediatric Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University. Dr. Edwards’s work has focused on the evaluation of new vaccines for the prevention of infectious diseases in adults and children. She has conducted large efficacy trials of a live-attenuated intranasal influenza virus vaccine and has coordinated multicenter trials of the safety and immunogenicity of new generations of the Haemophilus influenzae type b and Bordetella per-

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The Anthrax Vaccine: Is it Safe? Does it Work? tussis vaccines. Studies of the efficacy of Streptococcus pneumoniae vaccines are in progress. Her laboratory efforts have focused on the standardization of serologic markers of vaccine response and correlates of protection against natural disease. Dr. Edwards is a member of the Society for Pediatric Research and is a fellow of the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the American Academy of Pediatrics. She has previously served as a member of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration. Denise L. Faustman, M.D, Ph.D., is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and director of immunobiology at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Her research interests include diabetes, autoimmune diseases, and transplantation. Many of her experimental approaches capture the molecular and genetic bases of preferential autoimmune disease expression in women. She was the inventor of the concept of modifying donor antigens on cells before transplantation, which serves as the platform technology for the use of cloning technology in this clinical arena. Over the past 10 years she discovered two deranged biological pathways in autoimmune lymphocytes that now serve as potential therapeutic sites for the permanent reversal of autoimmunity. In the case of murine autoimmune models, the complete reversal of established diabetic autoimmunity has yielded the first data demonstrating the regeneration in situ of the missing islet tissue. She serves as co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Women’s Health and Gender-Based Medicine and since 2000 has served as chairman of the board for the Society for the Advancement of Women’s Health Research. She has served on several National Research Council and Institute of Medicine committees, including the Committee on Methods for Producing Monoclonal Antibodies, Committee for Xenograft Transplantation, and the Committee on Gender Differences in Susceptibility to Environmental Factors. Emil C. Gotschlich, M.D., is vice president for medical sciences at the Rockefeller University, where he is also R. Gwin Follis-Chevron Professor and head of the Laboratory of Bacterial Pathogenesis and Immunology. His early work led to the development of a vaccine for the prevention of group A and C meningococcal meningitis. His research has also been directed at the surface structures responsible for the pathogenicity of group B streptococci and gonococcus. Dr. Gotschlich is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and is a member of both the National Academy of Sciences and the Institute of Medicine.

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The Anthrax Vaccine: Is it Safe? Does it Work? Dennis L. Kasper, M.D., is executive dean for academic programs, William Ellery Channing Professor of Medicine, and professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at Harvard Medical School. He also serves as director of the Channing Laboratory and as a senior physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. With his colleagues and students, Dr. Kasper studies the molecular basis of bacterial pathogenesis, applying the resulting knowledge to enhance understanding of the interactions of bacterial surface virulence factors with host defenses. Dr. Kasper’s studies focus on the molecular and chemical characterization of important bacterial virulence factors such as capsular polysaccharides, surface proteins, and toxins. The ultimate goal is to develop vaccines and immunomodulatory molecules to prevent bacterial infections and their complications. Dr. Kasper is a fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and the American Association for the Advancement of Science as well as a member of the Institute of Medicine. Don P. Metzgar, Ph.D., is a vaccine developer with a career spanning 34 years in research, manufacturing, development, and testing of vaccines. He has developed and licensed or supervised the development and licensing of 16 new or improved vaccines. Dr. Metzgar retired in 1994 from Connaught Laboratories, Ltd., as senior vice president with responsibilities for product development, including manufacturing, quality operations, medical affairs, regulatory affairs, engineering, and maintenance for the United States and Canada. He has served on the National Vaccine Advisory Committee. Dr. Metzgar maintains a relationship with his former employer as a consultant. Hugh H. Tilson, M.D., Dr.P.H., is clinical professor of epidemiology and health policy and senior adviser to the dean at the University of North Carolina School of Public Health. Dr. Tilson is a practicing epidemiologist and outcomes researcher, with a career in preventive medicine and public health that spans more than 30 years and that includes service as a director of both state and local health departments and as vice president for worldwide epidemiology, surveillance, and policy research at GlaxoWellcome. He is the author of more than 100 papers in the fields of epidemiology, outcomes and policy research, and public health; he is a fellow of the American College of Epidemiology; and he is former vice-chair of the American Board of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Tilson also served as president of the American College of Preventive Medicine from 1995 to 1997 and was founding co-president of the International Society for Pharmacoepidemiology. He serves as an adviser and consultant in health outcomes, drug safety, and evidence-based health policy to regulatory and government agencies as well as pharmaceutical companies.