STUDY COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Elizabeth Deakin, Chair, is Director of the University of California Transportation Center and a professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of California at Berkeley. She also holds faculty appointments in the Energy and Resources Group and in the Master of Urban Design Program at Berkeley. She received S.B. and S.M. degrees in political science and civil engineering/transportation from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a law degree from Boston College Law School. Her areas of expertise include transportation planning and policy, land use planning and administration, and environmental policy. She has authored or coauthored more than 150 journal articles and technical reports as well as a book and six book chapters. She served as Chair of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Transportation and Land Development from 1992 to 1998. She is the California Senate’s appointee to the state’s Vehicle Inspection Maintenance Review Committee and has served on a number of local government commissions. She currently sits on the board of three nonprofit environmental organizations.


F. Kaid Benfield is an environmental attorney and director of transportation and smart growth policy for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in Washington, D.C. He has also served the organization as director of its land program, director of its forestry and agriculture projects, and legal affairs coordinator. Before coming to NRDC, he worked at the U.S. Department of Justice and in private legal practice. He is a graduate of Emory University and Georgetown University Law Center and the author of numerous publications related to environmental law and policy, including the books Solving Sprawl (with Jutka Terris and



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Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy - Special Report 268 STUDY COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION Elizabeth Deakin, Chair, is Director of the University of California Transportation Center and a professor in the Department of City and Regional Planning at the University of California at Berkeley. She also holds faculty appointments in the Energy and Resources Group and in the Master of Urban Design Program at Berkeley. She received S.B. and S.M. degrees in political science and civil engineering/transportation from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a law degree from Boston College Law School. Her areas of expertise include transportation planning and policy, land use planning and administration, and environmental policy. She has authored or coauthored more than 150 journal articles and technical reports as well as a book and six book chapters. She served as Chair of the Transportation Research Board (TRB) Committee on Transportation and Land Development from 1992 to 1998. She is the California Senate’s appointee to the state’s Vehicle Inspection Maintenance Review Committee and has served on a number of local government commissions. She currently sits on the board of three nonprofit environmental organizations. F. Kaid Benfield is an environmental attorney and director of transportation and smart growth policy for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) in Washington, D.C. He has also served the organization as director of its land program, director of its forestry and agriculture projects, and legal affairs coordinator. Before coming to NRDC, he worked at the U.S. Department of Justice and in private legal practice. He is a graduate of Emory University and Georgetown University Law Center and the author of numerous publications related to environmental law and policy, including the books Solving Sprawl (with Jutka Terris and

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Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy - Special Report 268 Nancy Vorsanger) and Once There Were Greenfields (with Mathew D. Raimi and Donald D. T. Chen). He is a member of several steering committees and boards relating to transportation and smart growth. Kenneth J. Button is currently Professor of Public Policy at George Mason University. He received a B.A. in economics from the University of East Anglia, an M.A. in economics from the University of Leeds, and a Ph.D. in economics from Loughborough University. He has been elected a Fellow of the Institute of Logistics and Transport, Fellow of the Institution of Highways and Transportation, and Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Transport. His areas of expertise include transport economics, travel demand modeling, environmental economics, and international transport policy. He has authored or coauthored more than 80 books and hundreds of articles and papers pertaining to various aspects of transportation policy. Currently, he is the Editor-in-Chief for Transportation Research D, Transportation and Environment, and the Journal of Air Transport Management. He serves on numerous committees and in 1996 cochaired the European Science Foundation/National Science Foundation Joint Initiative on Transport Research. Judith M. Espinosa is the director of the Alliance for Transportation Research Institute at the University of New Mexico. She received a B.A. in nursing from the University of New Mexico; a master’s degree in public health administration from the University of California, Los Angeles; and a doctor of jurisprudence from the University of New Mexico. She was recently nominated by President Clinton and confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as a Trustee on the Morris K. Udall Foundation for Scholarship and Excellence in National Environmental Policy, and she chairs the Good Neighbor Environmental Board, a federal advisory committee on U.S.– Mexico environmental and infrastructure issues. She served for 4 years as New Mexico’s Secretary of Environment and for 2 years as its Secretary of Transportation. She currently is a member of the following boards: the National Wildlife Federation, the Environmental Leadership Program, the Surface Transportation Policy Project, the Energy Foundation, and the Clean Air Action Corporation. She has written several articles on transportation and the environment. Richard T. T. Forman is Professor of Advanced Environmental Studies in Landscape Ecology at Harvard University. He received a B.S. from Haverford College, a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania, an honorary A.M. from Harvard University, an honorary doctor of humane letters from

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Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy - Special Report 268 Miami University, and an honorary doctor of science from Florida International University. His interests and research include the principles of landscape and regional ecology, forest ecology, the spatial meshing of nature and people, and the ecology of road systems. He has authored numerous articles, and his books include Landscape Ecology Principles in Landscape Architecture and Land Use Planning and the award-winning Land Mosaics: The Ecology of Landscapes and Regions. He has served as President of the Torrey Botanical Society and as Vice President of the Ecological Society of America. In 1992 he was named Distinguished Landscape Ecologist, and he has received medals and awards in eight countries. He is the lead author of a forthcoming book, Road Ecology: Science and Solutions. Fred Hansen is the General Manager of the Tri-County Metropolitan Transportation District of Oregon (Tri-Met). He assumed this position in 1998. Previously he served for 4 years as the Deputy Administrator for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in Washington, D.C., where he managed EPA’s day-to-day operations and was involved in all major policy issues. Before joining EPA, Hansen directed the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality for more than 10 years. He also served as Oregon’s Deputy State Treasurer as well as in previous positions in Washington, D.C., where he worked as Executive Officer of the Peace Corps and Chief of Staff to a member of Congress from Oregon. He received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oregon (Phi Beta Kappa) and a master’s degree from McMaster University, and he completed a year of doctoral work at The Johns Hopkins University. Edwin E. Herricks is Professor of Environmental Biology in the Department of Civil Engineering at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He received a B.A. in biology and English from the University of Kansas, an M.S. in engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, and a Ph.D. in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. His areas of expertise include aquatic ecology, biomonitoring, and stream ecosystem management, and he has broad experience in the identification, assessment, and restoration of the adverse effects of man’s activities on streams, rivers, lakes, and their watersheds. Recent research has focused on storm-water toxicity, stream restoration, climate change impact, and environmental management systems integration. He has authored or coauthored three books; his most recent book, Stormwater Runoff in Receiving Streams: Impact, Monitoring, Management, was published in 1995. He has authored more than 140 articles and reports. He has recently served on National

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Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy - Special Report 268 Research Council (NRC) panels addressing river navigation and nuclear waste issues, and he is presently a member of the Panel on Methods and Techniques of Corps of Engineers Project Analysis. Herricks is an advisor to local, state, and federal agencies and has participated in educational and management programs in the United Kingdom, Yugoslavia, France, Germany, Japan, and Taiwan. Wayne W. Kober has more than 28 years of multimodal transportation and environmental management experience for both the public and private sectors. He has a B.S. degree in environmental resource management from Penn State University. He is nationally recognized as an innovative leader in the field of transportation project development and environmental management. His broad span of experience at successfully integrating environmental analysis, agency/public involvement, and context-sensitive design aspects into a systematic decision-making process has enabled him to play a prominent role in advancing Pennsylvania’s multimodal transportation improvement programs. In addition, he has worked at the regional and national levels in leading the development of environmental streamlining and stewardship legislation, policies, and practices. He is in private practice and currently serves as a Senior Transportation and Environmental Management Specialist for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO). Alan J. Krupnick is Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future and Director of its Quality of the Environment Division. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland. His research interests include the analysis of environmental issues, with a particular focus on air pollution, cost–benefit analysis, and the design of environmental policies, including their intersection with transportation policies. He recently cochaired a federal advisory committee that provided counsel to EPA on implementing its new ozone and particulate standards. In 1994 Dr. Krupnick served as a senior staff economist for environment and natural resources on the President’s Council of Economic Advisers. He served on TRB’s Committee for a Review of the Highway Cost Allocation Study and its Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, and he is currently a member of NRC’s Committee on Research and Peer Review in EPA. Martin Lee-Gosselin is currently Professor of Planning at Laval University, Quebec, Canada. He received a Ph.D. in urban, technological, and environmental planning from the University of Michigan, as well as master’s

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Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy - Special Report 268 and bachelor’s degrees in interdisciplinary fields from Michigan State University and the University of Bristol, England. He specializes in survey and analysis methods to investigate travel behavior both as it exists now and in response to future changes in policy or the availability of alternative fuel, vehicle, and telecommunications technologies. He is the principal investigator of a major network research program, involving seven Canadian universities, on the behavioral foundations of integrated land use, transport, and environmental impact models. Before joining Laval in 1990, he was a SERC Visiting Research Fellow at London and Oxford Universities. He spent 20 years in university research, state government, and the private sector, including 7 as Research Director for the Office of the Secretary of State of Michigan. He has served on various international bodies for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, the World Health Organization, and the European Community; on the Japanese institute IATSS; on five TRB committees; and on the Board of the International Association for Travel Behaviour Research. He has coedited several books, including Understanding Travel Behaviour in an Era of Change (1997) with Peter Stopher, and has published numerous articles on the travel behavior, energy, environmental, and safety aspects of transportation. Ysela Llort is the State Transportation Planner for the Florida Department of Transportation. In this capacity, she oversees the statewide and systems planning function for the Department of Transportation. Among her primary responsibilities are executive level policy formulation and interpretation, as well as working with the numerous transportation partners, including metropolitan planning organizations, to obtain consensus on needs and priorities for the state. Prior to her work with the Florida Department of Transportation, Ms. Llort served 9 years with the Virginia Department of Transportation as Assistant District Engineer for Planning and Operations in Northern Virginia, adjacent to Washington, D.C. Ms. Llort is a graduate of Duke University, where she earned a degree in economics; she holds master’s degrees from Clemson University in both city and regional planning and transportation engineering. C. Ian MacGillivray is Director of the Engineering Division for the Iowa Department of Transportation. He is responsible for the department’s traffic and transportation safety programs along with general coordination and management of research, technology transfer, and the department’s engineering staff/process development programs. He served as the Director of the Planning and Research Division from 1977 to 1993. Mr. MacGillivray

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Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy - Special Report 268 received a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering from the University of Alberta and a master of science degree in civil engineering from Purdue University. He currently serves on the AASHTO Standing Committee on Research; chairs the National Cooperative Highway Research Program’s (NCHRP) Project Panel 20-05: Synthesis of Information Related to Highway Problems; serves as Vice Chair of AASHTO’s Special Committee on International Activity Coordination; and serves on various other TRB, AASHTO, and NCHRP committees. Jane T. Nishida has been Maryland’s Secretary of the Environment since 1995. She received a B.A. in international relations from Lewis and Clark College and a doctor of jurisprudence degree from Georgetown University Law Center. She currently serves on the following committees: Governor’s Council on the Chesapeake Bay, Governor’s Pesticide Council, Lead Hazard Advisory Committee, State Soil Conservation Committee, Northeast Ozone Transport Commission, Smart Growth and Neighborhood Conservation Subcabinet, Western Maryland Economic Development Task Force, and the World Trade Center Institute. She also chairs the Smart Growth Task Force of the Environmental Council of the States. John P. Poorman has been the Staff Director of the Capital District Transportation Committee (CDTC) since 1981. CDTC is the designated metropolitan planning organization for the four counties containing the Albany-Schenectady-Troy, New York, urbanized area. In recent years, CDTC has been recognized nationally for work in transportation and land use integration, public involvement in decision making, and the development of effective transportation system performance measures for planning and programming. Mr. Poorman received a B.A. in economics from Haverford College and an M.S. in transportation from Northwestern University. Since 1984 he has been a member of the adjunct faculty of the State University of New York at Albany’s graduate Urban and Regional Planning Program. He also serves as Chairman of the New York State Association of Metropolitan Planning Organization Directors and as a Member of TRB’s Executive Committee (1999–2002). In 1996 he was a recipient of an Environmental Fellowship from the German Marshall Fund of the United States. Catherine L. Ross recently became the Director of the Greater Georgia Regional Transportation Authority. Previously, she was the Associate Vice President for Academic Affairs, Co-Director of the Transportation Research and Education Center, and Professor of the Graduate City Planning Program

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Surface Transportation Environmental Research: A Long-Term Strategy - Special Report 268 at the Georgia Institute of Technology. She received an undergraduate degree from Kent State University and master’s and Ph.D. degrees in regional planning from Cornell University. Her areas of expertise include planning theory and policy analysis, transportation planning, impact assessment, disaster planning, urban revitalization, environmental planning, and public participation. She has written numerous articles and research reports on various aspects of transportation planning. She is a member of the TRB Executive Committee, the Urban Land Institute, the Urban Affairs Association, the American Planning Association, the Planners Network, the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, the Sigma Xi, the National Scientific Research Society, the Women’s Transportation Seminar, and the Conference of Minority Transportation Officials. Daniel Sperling is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Environmental Studies and founding Director of the Institute for Transportation Studies (ITS-Davis) at the University of California, Davis. He received a B.S. in systems analysis/urban planning from Cornell University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees, both in transportation engineering, from the University of California, Berkeley. His areas of expertise include alternative transportation fuels and the deployment of rail transit and intercity bus transit services. He has authored or coauthored more than 100 technical papers and 5 books in the last 14 years on advanced transportation technologies and energy and environmental aspects of transportation, and he was a principal contributor to a 1993 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development book on alternative fuels and a 1994 International Agency book on electric vehicles. His most recent book, Future Drive: Electric Vehicles and Sustainable Transportation, was published in 1995. He was the founding chair of TRB’s Committee on Alternative Transportation Fuels and serves on nine advisory committees for environmentally oriented research organizations and activities.

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