Communication

The committee searched for web-based materials aimed at an information-seeking parent, but it found several barriers. Similarly, the concerned public may spend a great deal of time seeking meaningful information, often without success. If an individual approaches the task stressed or concerned about the issue, it is likely that the search process will only increase that frustration. Thus, the committee is concerned that the public’s need for relevant information is not being effectively met. The committee again recommends that government agencies and professional organizations responsible for immunizations critically evaluate their communication services with increased understanding of, and input from, the intended users. It is important to ensure that the content and format of the communication methods and tools are appropriate, readily accessible, and relevant to the public.

BOX ES-1 Committee Conclusions and Recommendations

SCIENTIFIC ASSESSMENT

Causality Conclusions

The committee concludes that the evidence favors rejection of a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine administered to adults and incident multiple sclerosis.

The committee also concludes that the evidence favors rejection of a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine administered to adults and multiple sclerosis relapse.

The committee concludes that the evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine and the first episode of a central nervous system demyelinating disorder.

The committee concludes that the evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine and ADEM.

The committee concludes that the evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine and optic neuritis.

The committee concludes that the evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine and transverse myelitis.

The committee concludes that the evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine and GBS.

The committee concludes that the evidence is inadequate to accept or reject a causal relationship between hepatitis B vaccine and brachial neuritis.



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