APPENDIX
D
Biographical Sketches

Richard J. Bonnie (Chair) is John S. Battle professor of law at the University of Virginia School of Law and director of the University’s Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy. He writes and teaches in the fields of criminal law and procedure, mental health law, bioethics, and public health law. He has been deeply interested in issues involving psychiatry and human rights. In 1991, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and he has been an active participant in the National Academies’ work. He serves or has served on the IOM Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health, the IOM Committee to Assess the Science Base for Tobacco Harm Reduction, the National Research Council’s Committee on Data and Research for Policy on Illegal Drugs, and the IOM Committee to Assess the System for Protection of Human Research Subjects. He chaired the IOM Committee on Injury Prevention and Control, the IOM Committee on Opportunities in Drug Abuse Research, and was vice-chair of the IOM Committee on Preventing Nicotine Dependence in Children and Youths. He is a fellow of the Virginia Law Foundation, a charter fellow of the College on the Problems of Drug Dependence, and is on the board of directors of the college. He received the American Psychiatric Association’s Isaac Ray award in 1998 for contributions to forensic psychiatry and the psychiatric aspects of jurisprudence. He has a B.A. (1966) from Johns Hopkins University and a J.D. (1969) from the University of Virginia.

Terry Fulmer is co-director of the John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing, Division of Nursing, at New York University. She is



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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America APPENDIX D Biographical Sketches Richard J. Bonnie (Chair) is John S. Battle professor of law at the University of Virginia School of Law and director of the University’s Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy. He writes and teaches in the fields of criminal law and procedure, mental health law, bioethics, and public health law. He has been deeply interested in issues involving psychiatry and human rights. In 1991, he was elected to the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and he has been an active participant in the National Academies’ work. He serves or has served on the IOM Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health, the IOM Committee to Assess the Science Base for Tobacco Harm Reduction, the National Research Council’s Committee on Data and Research for Policy on Illegal Drugs, and the IOM Committee to Assess the System for Protection of Human Research Subjects. He chaired the IOM Committee on Injury Prevention and Control, the IOM Committee on Opportunities in Drug Abuse Research, and was vice-chair of the IOM Committee on Preventing Nicotine Dependence in Children and Youths. He is a fellow of the Virginia Law Foundation, a charter fellow of the College on the Problems of Drug Dependence, and is on the board of directors of the college. He received the American Psychiatric Association’s Isaac Ray award in 1998 for contributions to forensic psychiatry and the psychiatric aspects of jurisprudence. He has a B.A. (1966) from Johns Hopkins University and a J.D. (1969) from the University of Virginia. Terry Fulmer is co-director of the John A. Hartford Foundation Institute for Geriatric Nursing, Division of Nursing, at New York University. She is

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America also professor of nursing at New York University’s Division of Nursing and president of the Eastern Nursing Research Society. Her research focuses on acute care of the elderly, specifically on the subject of elder abuse and neglect. Her work on dyadic vulnerability/risk profiling for elder neglect is funded by the National Institute on Aging in partnership with the National Institute of Nursing Research. Her books include Inadequate Care of the Elderly: Health Care Perspective on Abuse and Neglect and Critical Nursing Care of the Elderly. Two of her books have received the American Journal of Nursing book of the year award. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, a fellow of the Gerontological Society of America and the New York Academy of Medicine, and distinguished practitioner of the National Academies of Practice. She completed a Brookdale fellowship and is a distinguished practitioner of the National Academies of Medicine. She was honored by the New York State Nurses Association with the distinguished nurse researcher award. She has chaired the clinical medicine section of the Gerontological Society of America and has been on the congress of nursing economics for the American Nurses Association. She has an undergraduate degree from Skidmore College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Boston College. Marisa A. Gerstein is a research assistant for the Committee on National Statistics and has worked on several of its panels, including the Panel to Review the 2000 Census, the Panel on Formula Allocations, and the Panel on Methods for Assessing Discrimination. She came to the Committee from Burch Munford Direct, a direct-mail company, and previously worked for the National Abortion and Reproductive Rights Action League. She has a B.A. in sociology from New College of Florida (1999). Lora Flattum Hamp is a fellow of the Borchard Foundation Center on Law and Aging at the University of Georgia School of Law. Previously, she worked as an assistant director of an area agency on aging and served on the board of the Virginia Association on Aging. She has conducted research on state statutes governing elder abuse and studied factors contributing to the unmet legal needs of the elderly. She assisted in drafting the National Handbook on Laws and Programs Affecting Senior Citizens and was awarded the title of Virginia’s Ambassador for the Aging by the Virginia Department for the Aging. Hamp has a B.S. in chemistry from the College of William and Mary, an M.S. in gerontology from the Medical College of Virginia, and a J.D. from the University of Virginia School of Law. Richard A. Kulka is senior research vice president of statistics, health, and social policy at the Research Triangle Institute in Research Triangle Park, NC. Previously, he was senior vice president for survey research at the

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America National Opinion Research Center. He has been involved in the design, conduct, and analysis of numerous statistical surveys on health, mental health, and other social policy issues for over two decades, while also conducting a broad range of applied research on survey research methods in these areas. Kulka is a member of several professional associations, including the American Statistical Association, the American Association for Public Opinion Research, and the American Public Health Association. He has a Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Michigan. Eva Kutas is the director of the Office of Investigations and Training of the Oregon Department of Human Resources, which is the adult protective services agency that responds to all allegations of abuse and neglect of people with mental illness or developmental disabilities in Oregon. The office also provides training about abuse and neglect to providers and clients, mandatory abuse reporters, and the public. She has criminal and civil law experience and worked at the Oregon Advocacy Center (Oregon’s protection and advocacy agency for people with disabilities) for 10 years as an advocate. She has conducted approximately 600 investigations over 15 years, specializing in complex cases and unusual or questionable deaths. She has also lectured extensively on the subject of interviewing people with disabilities who are victims of abuse or neglect. She is the current president of the National Association of Adult Protective Services Administrators, an organization that strives to improve the quality and availability of services to vulnerable adults who are abused, neglected, and exploited, to promote advocacy, training, and research in the field and to educate the public and government leaders on behalf of this population. She received her B.A. and M.S. from the University of Oregon, and her J.D. from Northwestern School of Law of Lewis and Clark College. Edward O. Laumann is the George Herbert Mead distinguished service professor in the Department of Sociology and the College at the University of Chicago, chairman of the Department of Sociology, and director of the Ogburn Stouffer Center for Population and Social Organization. Previously he was editor of the American Journal of Sociology, dean of the Social Sciences Division, and provost (chief academic officer) at the university. Before coming to Chicago, he taught at the University of Michigan. Laumann’s research interests include social stratification, the sociology of the professions, occupations, and formal organizations, social network analysis, the analysis of elite groups and national policy making, and the sociology of human sexuality. Among his published books are three volumes on human sexuality: The Social Organization of Sexuality, Sex in America, and Sex, Love and Health in America. He is vice president of the board of trustees of the National Opinion Research Center, a fellow of the

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America American Association for the Advancement of Science, a fellow of the Society for the Scientific Study of Sexuality, an associate director of the Center for Clinical Medical Ethics at the Pritzker School of Medicine, a member of the board of directors of the Metropolitan Chicago Information Center, current chair of the section on economic and political sciences of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a former member of the University of Chicago board of governors for the Argonne National Laboratory, and a former member of the board of trustees of the University of Chicago Hospitals. He has a B.A. from Oberlin College (1960) and M.A. (1962) and Ph.D. (1964) degrees from Harvard University. Tanya M. Lee is a project assistant for the Committee on National Statistics. Before joining the staff in September 2001, she worked for the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Strategies for Small Number Participants Clinical Research Trails and the Committee on Creating a Vision for Space Medicine during Travel Beyond Earth Orbit. She has been with the National Academy of Sciences since April 2000. She attended the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore, and Prince Georges Community College, pursuing a degree in sociology. Constantine G. Lyketsos is a board-certified geriatric psychiatrist who directs the Johns Hopkins Neuropsychiatry Service and the Comprehensive Alzheimer Program. He is an active clinician with an expertise in dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. With Peter Rabins and Cindy Steele he authored Practical Dementia Care and has contributed numerous publications to the international scientific literature on dementia, geriatrics, depression, neuropsychiatry, Alzheimer’s disease, and HIV/AIDS. His ongoing research focuses on the impact and treatment of psychiatric disturbances in Alzheimer’s disease, its diagnosis and prevention, the epidemiology of cognitive decline and dementia, and on the care of persons with dementia. He has special expertise in the design and conduct of clinical epidemiological and intervention studies. He was recently cited in Best Doctors in America. He has a B.A. from Northwestern University, an M.D. from Washington University in St. Louis, and an M.H.S. from Johns Hopkins School of Public Health with a focus on clinical epidemiology. Gary B. Melton is professor of psychology and director of the Institute on Family and Neighborhood Life at Clemson University. A past president of the American Psychology-Law Society and the American Psychological Association (APA) Division of Child, Youth, and Family Services, he has received awards for distinguished scholarship in the public interest from APA itself (twice), two of its divisions, the American Psychological Founda-

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America tion, Psi Chi, and Prevent Child Abuse America. He has written or edited numerous scholarly publications, and his work has been cited by U.S. courts at all levels. He has consulted, lectured, or conducted research in 24 countries and territories abroad, and he is nearing completion of two three-year terms as president of Childwatch International, a global network of child research centers. He received his B.A. from the University of Virginia, and his M.A. and a PhD in clinical-community psychology from Boston University. Laura Mosqueda is director of geriatrics and associate clinical professor of family medicine at the Irvine College of Medicine, University of California, Irvine. She also is an associate clinical professor in family medicine at the college. She is the principal investigator of a 3-year project to create, implement, and evaluate an interdisciplinary elder abuse medical response team. This team works closely with adult protective services, law enforcement, and the district attorney’s office in addressing the abuse and neglect of older adults and adults with disabilities. She also serves as the co-director of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Aging with a Disability at Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center. Previously she served as the co-chief of the Elder Abuse Domain of the California Medical Training Center, where she was responsible for creating and implementing courses designed to train physicians and health care professionals in the medical forensic aspects of elder abuse. She has an M.D. from the University of Southern California School of Medicine. Gregory Paveza is currently professor in the School of Social Work and one of the founding faculty in the interdisciplinary Aging Studies Program at the University of South Florida. He has been a clinical social work practitioner, a social service agency administrator, and a health sciences researcher. His research deals with issues related to the social consequences of caregiving and Alzheimer’s disease, including a specific interest in elder mistreatment in these families. He also has a general interest in elder mistreatment and its impact on the broader aging community. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Training Needs of Health Professionals to Respond to Family Violence and a member of the Leadership Council of the Mental Health and Aging Network of the American Society on Aging. He has published extensively on issues related to geriatric assessment, the caregiving consequences of Alzheimer’s disease, including the cost of providing community-based care, and elder mistreatment. He has a B.A. from Lewis College (1969), an M.S.W. from the University of Hawaii (1973), and a Ph.D. in public health sciences (psychiatric epidemiology, 1986) from the School of Public Health at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America Karl Pillemer is professor of human development and director of the Cornell Gerontology Research Institute at Cornell University. His interests center on human development over the life course, with a special emphasis on family and social relationships in middle age and beyond. His research, funded over the past 10 years by the National Institutes of Health, involves family members who provide care to Alzheimer’s disease victims, examining the relationships among social network structure, social support, and psychological well-being. A second major interest is in intergenerational relations in later life, with a focus on determinants and consequences of the quality of adult child-parent relationships (including international comparative work on this topic). Over the past two decades, Pillemer has conducted a long-term program of research on conflict and abuse in families of the aged, including several related studies of the domestic abuse of elderly persons. These have included large-scale prevalence surveys in the United States and Canada, evaluations of abuse prevention and treatment programs, and longitudinal research that examines the health consequences of maltreatment. Pillemer has also conducted several studies of abuse in long-term care facilities. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Brandeis University. Earl S. Pollack is a member of the staff of the Committee on National Statistics and served as study director for this panel. Previously, he was chief of biometry at the National Cancer Institute and director of the Division of Biometry and Epidemiology at the National Institute of Mental Health. More recently, he was research professor at the Biostatistics Center, George Washington University, and served as statistician for the Center to Protect Workers Rights, the construction research arm of the AFL/CIO. His interests are in chronic disease epidemiology and the analysis of observational data from large health and medical databases. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association, the American College of Epidemiology, and the American Public Health Association. He has B.S. and M.A. degrees in statistics from the University of Minnesota and an Sc.D. in biostatistics from Harvard University. Lori A. Stiegel is associate staff director of the American Bar Association’s Commission on Legal Problems of the Elderly in Washington, DC. She is currently directing three projects on elder abuse and older battered women with funding from the U.S. Department of Justice, as well as the commission’s activities in its role as a partner in the National Center on Elder Abuse funded by the U.S. Administration on Aging. She serves on the board of directors of the National Committee for the Prevention of Elder Abuse and is the author of Elder Abuse in the State Courts: Three Curricular Judges and Court Staff and Recommended Guidelines for State Courts

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America Handling Cases Involving Elder Abuse. She has a B.A. from the University of Florida, and a J.D. from George Washington University National Law Center. Robert B. Wallace is professor of epidemiology and internal medicine at the University of Iowa’s College of Public Health and Medicine and interim director of the university’s Center on Aging. He has been a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force and is now a senior adviser to it, and was also a member of the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. He is currently chair of the Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention of the Institute of Medicine. He served on the executive committee of the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine and was chair of the epidemiology section of the American Public Health Association. He is the author or coauthor of numerous publications and book chapters and has been the editor of four books, including the current edition of Public Health and Preventive Medicine. His research interests concern the causes and prevention of disabling conditions of older persons. He has had substantial experience in the conduct of both observational cohort studies of older persons and clinical trials, including preventive interventions related to osteoporotic fracture and coronary disease prevention. He is the site principal investigator for the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), a national intervention trial exploring the prevention of breast and colon cancer and coronary disease. He has been a collaborator in several international studies of the prevention of chronic illness in older persons. He has a B.S.M in medicine (1964) and an M.D. (1967) from Northwestern University and an M.Sc. in epidemiology from the State University of New York, Buffalo (1972). OTHER CONTRIBUTORS Ronald Acierno is assistant professor of psychiatry at the National Crime Victims Research and Treatment Center of the Medical University of South Carolina. He specializes in the assessment and treatment of psychopathology in older adults who have been victims of assault, abuse, neglect, and exploitation. He has a B.A. (with distinction) in psychology from the University of Virginia (1989) and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in clinical psychology from Nova-Southeastern University (1996). Marie-Therese Connolly, a senior trial counsel in the Civil Division of the U.S. Department of Justice, coordinates its Nursing Home Initiative and elder justice activities. In that capacity, she coordinates the department’s internal efforts and works with federal, state, and local entities (and in particular with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services), aca-

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America demics, advocates, providers, and others on nursing home and elder-related issues and cases. She has a B.A. from Stanford University, and her J.D. from Northeastern University School of Law. Rebecca Susan Dresser is Daniel Noyes Kirby professor of law at the Washington University School of Law. She has written extensively on legal and ethical issues in the progression of dementia, the end of life, and informed consent, among other areas. She has a B.A. in psychology and sociology (1973) and an M.S. in education (1975) from Indiana University, Bloomington, and a J.D. from Harvard Law School (1979). Carmel Bitondo Dyer is associate professor of medicine at Baylor College of Medicine as well as co-director and founder of the Texas Elder Abuse and Mistreatment Institute established in 1997. Her clinical interests include care of the elderly poor, elder mistreatment, dementia, delirium, depression, and geriatric assessment. She is board certified in internal medicine and geriatrics and has been the director of the geriatrics program at the Harris County Hospital District since completing her postgraduate training in 1993. She has an M.D. from Baylor College of Medicine (1988). Thomas L. Hafemeister is the director of legal studies at the Institute of Law, Psychiatry, and Public Policy of the University of Virginia. He is also an instructor at the University of Virginia Law School and an associate professor of medical education in the Department of Psychiatric Medicine at the University of Virginia Medical School. He has conducted research on a wide range of topics, including end-of-life decision making, guardianship and conservatorship proceedings, public health law and the public health system, and tort law in the health care system. He has a J.D. from the University of Nebraska Law School (1982) and a Ph.D. in social psychology (1988) from the University of Nebraska as part of a joint J.D./Ph.D. degree program. Catherine Hawes is professor in the Department of Health Policy and Management, School of Rural Public Health, at the Texas A&M University’s Health Science Center. She is also director of the Southwest Rural Health Research Center, one of six federally funded rural health research centers nationwide. She has been active in research, teaching, and policy making in long-term care for more than 25 years. She has a B.A. from Principia College and a Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin. Patricia J. McFeeley is assistant chief medical investigator for the state of New Mexico. She is certified in anatomic and forensic pathology by the American Board of Pathology. She has an undergraduate degree from Ohio

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Elder Mistreatment: Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation in an Aging America Wesleyan University and an M.D. from the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. Rosalie S. Wolf was executive director of the Institute on Aging at UMass Memorial Health Care, the clinical partner of the University of Massachusetts Medical School, and assistant professor of family medicine and community health. She passed away in fall 2001. A major portion of her time in the past two decades was devoted to the study of elder abuse in domestic settings. With Karl A. Pillemer, she co-edited Elder Abuse: Conflict in the Family and co-authored Helping Elderly Victims: The Reality of Elder Abuse. She had a B.S. from the University of Wisconsin and a Ph.D. in social welfare policy with a concentration in aging from the Florence Heller Graduate School at Brandeis University. David Wolfe is professor of psychology and psychiatry at the University of Western Ontario and director of the Center for Research on Violence Against Women and Children. He has broad research and clinical interests in abnormal child psychology, with a special focus on child abuse, domestic violence, and developmental psychopathology. He has a B.A. in psychology from University of Rochester (1973) and an M.A. in psychology (1978) and a Ph.D. in clinical psychology (1980) from the University of South Florida.

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