Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Dorothy P. Rice, Sc.D. (Hon.) (Chair) is Professor Emeritus of Medical Economics at the Institute for Health and Aging, School of Nursing, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). From 1983 to 1994, she was Professor-in-Residence at UCSF. Previously she served as Director of the National Center for Health Statistics and was Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Research and Statistics at the Social Security Administration. Professor Rice’s major research interests and expertise include health statistics; survey research, design, and methods; disability; chronic illness; cost-of-illness studies; and the economics of medical care. She has achieved national and international renown for her leadership role, extensive research, and scholarly publications. Professor Rice has received numerous awards including an honorary Doctor of Science from the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Public Health Association and the American Statistical Association, and a member of the Institute of Medicine.

Monroe Berkowitz, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Director of Disability and Health Economics in the Bureau of Economic Research at Rutgers University. He has served as a consultant to various government agencies including the Social Security Administration, the World Health Organization, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Berkowitz is a leading authority on the economics of disability and rehabilitation in public programs (SSA disability insurance and workers’ compensation), private disability insurance, and public and



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The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs Biographical Sketches of Committee Members Dorothy P. Rice, Sc.D. (Hon.) (Chair) is Professor Emeritus of Medical Economics at the Institute for Health and Aging, School of Nursing, University of California at San Francisco (UCSF). From 1983 to 1994, she was Professor-in-Residence at UCSF. Previously she served as Director of the National Center for Health Statistics and was Deputy Assistant Commissioner for Research and Statistics at the Social Security Administration. Professor Rice’s major research interests and expertise include health statistics; survey research, design, and methods; disability; chronic illness; cost-of-illness studies; and the economics of medical care. She has achieved national and international renown for her leadership role, extensive research, and scholarly publications. Professor Rice has received numerous awards including an honorary Doctor of Science from the College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. She is a Fellow of the American Public Health Association and the American Statistical Association, and a member of the Institute of Medicine. Monroe Berkowitz, Ph.D., is Professor Emeritus of Economics and Director of Disability and Health Economics in the Bureau of Economic Research at Rutgers University. He has served as a consultant to various government agencies including the Social Security Administration, the World Health Organization, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Berkowitz is a leading authority on the economics of disability and rehabilitation in public programs (SSA disability insurance and workers’ compensation), private disability insurance, and public and

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The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs private rehabilitation systems; and has conducted extensive comparative analysis of foreign systems. He is a member of the National Academy of Arbitrators, the National Academy of Social Insurance, the American Economic Association, and the Industrial Relations Research Association. Ronald S. Brookmeyer, Ph.D., is Professor of Biostatistics and Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Hygiene and Public Health. He has been a Visiting Biostatistician at the National Cancer Institute and the International Agency for Research on Cancer in Lyon, France. Dr. Brookmeyer’s research interests and expertise are in statistical modeling and methodology, biometrics, and epidemiology. He is the recipient of the Spiegelman Gold Medal awarded by the American Public Health Association for contributions to health statistics. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the Biometrics Society and the Society for Epidemiological Research. Marshal F. Folstein, M.D., is Chair and Professor of Psychiatry at Tufts University School of Medicine and Psychiatrist-in-Chief at the New England Medical Center (NEMC). Prior to joining NEMC, he was Eugene Meyer III Professor of Psychiatry and Medicine at the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. His expertise and research interests are in neuropsychiatry, disability research, and Alzheimer’s disease. Dr. Folstein created the Mini-Mental State Examination, widely used for assessing cognitive mental status in medical patients and in population surveys. He is a Fellow of the American College of Physicians, the American Psychiatric Association, and the Gerontological Society; and a member of the American Neurological Association and the Society for Epidemiological Research. Robert M. Groves, Ph.D., is a Professor of Sociology and Senior Research Scientist at the University of Michigan, and a research professor at the Joint Program in Survey Methodology, based at the University of Maryland, a consortium of the University of Maryland, University of Michigan, and Westat, Inc. He is Director of the University of Michigan Survey Research Center. From 1990 to 1992, Dr. Groves was an Associate Director of the U.S. Census Bureau, on loan from Michigan. He has over 25 years of experience with large-scale surveys, and has investigated the impact of alternative telephone sample designs on precision, the effect of data collection mode on the quality of survey reports, causes and remedies for nonresponse errors in surveys, estimation and explanation of interviewer variance in survey responses, and other topics in survey methods. His current research interests focus on theory-building in survey participation and models of nonresponse reduction and adjustment. He is a Fellow

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The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs of the American Statistical Association, an elected member of the International Statistical Institute, former President of the American Association for Public Opinion Research, and former Chair of the Survey Research Methods Section of the American Statistical Association. Alan M. Jette, Ph.D., is Professor and Dean of Boston University’s Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, and Professor of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Boston University School of Public Health. His previous appointments have included Chief Research Scientist, New England Research Institute; Associate Professor, Massachusetts General’s Institute of Health Professions; and Assistant Professor, Division on Aging, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Jette currently directs the Edward R. Roybal Research Center on Enhancing Late-Life Function, funded by the National Institute on Aging. Within the Roybal Center, he and his colleagues are testing physical activity and other intervention strategies designed to prevent late-life disability. He also directs Boston University’s Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Measuring Research. In this Center, he and his colleagues are applying modern psychometric methods to the development of the next generation of outcome instruments for use in rehabilitation. William D. Kalsbeek, Ph.D., is Professor of Biostatistics and Director of the Survey Research Unit at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. His prior experience includes statistical research with the Office of Research and Methodology at the National Center for Health Statistics and at the Sampling Research and Design Center at the Research Triangle Institute in North Carolina. Dr. Kalsbeek’s research interests and areas of expertise are in biostatistics, survey design and research, and assessment; and he is well known for his work in survey methods. He is a Fellow of the American Statistical Association and a member of the American Public Health Association. Jerry L. Mashaw, LL.B., Ph.D., is Sterling Professor of Law and Management and Professor at the Institute of Social and Policy Studies at Yale University. He is a leading scholar in administrative law and has written widely on social insurance, social welfare issues, and disability policy. Dr. Mashaw recently chaired the National Academy of Social Insurance’s Disability Policy Panel. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Arts and Sciences and founding coeditor of the Journal of Law Economics and Organization. Catharine C. (Katie) Maslow, M.S.W., is Director of the Initiatives on Managed Care and Acute Care at the Alzheimer’s Association. Prior to

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The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs this, she was at the U.S. Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), and has experience in public welfare, mental health, and nursing home settings. Her research and consumer interests include aging, disability, criteria for long-term care, client assessment, and Alzheimer’s disease. Ms. Maslow is a member of the National Association of Social Workers, the American Public Health Association, the Gerontological Society of America, and the American Society on Aging. Donald L. Patrick, Ph.D., M.S.P.H., is Professor of Health Services and Director of the Social and Behavioral Sciences Program at the University of Washington School of Public Health. He holds adjunct appointments in epidemiology, sociology, pharmacy, and rehabilitation medicine, and is a senior investigator at the University’s Center for Disability Policy and Research. Dr. Patrick’s research interests and expertise are in social determinants of health, adolescent health, health policy for people with disabilities, and health and quality of life assessment. He is a Fellow of the Association of Health Services Research, and a member of the American Public Health Association, the British Society of Social Medicine, and the Society for Disability Studies. He was the inaugural president of the International Society for Quality of Life Research and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Harold A. Pincus, M.D., is the Executive Vice Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinics. He is also a Senior Scientist at RAND and directs the RAND Health Institute in Pittsburgh. Dr. Pincus directs the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s National Program on Depression in Primary Care: Linking Clinical and Systems Strategies. He was the Deputy Medical Director of the American Psychiatric Association (APA) and founding director of the APA’s Office of Research, and Executive Director of the American Psychiatric Institute for Research and Education. Previously, Dr. Pincus was the Special Assistant to the Director of the National Institute of Mental Health. Dr. Pincus received the William C. Menninger Memorial Award of the American College of Physicians for distinguished contributions to the science of mental health and the Health Services Research Senior Scholar Award of the American Psychiatric Association for outstanding contributions to the field. He also maintains a small private practice specializing in major affective disorders and has worked for 22 years at a public mental health clinic, caring for patients with severe mental illnesses. Dr. Pincus has led major health policy research and training projects on the interrelationships among general medical care, mental health, and substance abuse; diagnosis, classifica-

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The Dynamics of Disability: Measuring and Monitoring Disability for Social Security Programs tion, and treatment of mental disorders; research career development; and assessment of disability and functioning. Edward H. Yelin, Ph.D., is Professor of Medicine and Health Policy at the University of California, San Francisco, where he has primary academic appointments in the Department of Medicine and Institute for Health Policy Studies. He is also the Director of the Arthritis Research Group at UCSF. Dr. Yelin’s research interests concern the impact of managed care on persons with chronic conditions and disability and employment problems among persons with disabilities. He has over 110 publications in these areas, including Disability and the Displaced Worker (Rutgers University Press). Dr. Yelin is a member of the American Public Health Association and American College of Rheumatology. He has received many academic awards, including the Distinguished Scholar Award from the Association of Rheumatology Health Professionals. He was recently elected to membership in the National Academy of Social Insurance.