A
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

LEWIS GOLDFRANK, M.D. (Chair), is Director of Emergency Medicine, New York University Hospital Center, Bellevue Medical Center. He is also the medical director of the New York City Poison Control Center. Dr. Goldfrank served as president of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and chaired the American Board of Emergency Medicine’s Subboard on Medical Toxicology. He is coeditor of the Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry’s Medical Guidelines for Managing Hazmat Incidents and senior editor of Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies, a standard text in medical toxicology. Dr. Goldfrank is a member of the Institute of Medicine and previously served on the Committee on Research and Development Needs for Improving Civilian Medical Response to Chemical and Biological Terrorism Incidents.

JOSEPH BARBERA, M.D., is Co-Director of the George Washington University Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management. He is an Associate Professor of Engineering and Clinical Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at The George Washington University. Dr. Barbera is residency trained in emergency medicine and family medicine and has been involved in responses to hurricanes, the Oklahoma City bombing, mine disasters, earthquakes, and biological terrorism threats since 1986. Dr. Barbera has been the lead medical consultant for the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the development of the National Urban Search & Rescue Response System and has provided extensive consulta



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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program A Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE LEWIS GOLDFRANK, M.D. (Chair), is Director of Emergency Medicine, New York University Hospital Center, Bellevue Medical Center. He is also the medical director of the New York City Poison Control Center. Dr. Goldfrank served as president of the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and chaired the American Board of Emergency Medicine’s Subboard on Medical Toxicology. He is coeditor of the Agency for Toxic Substances Disease Registry’s Medical Guidelines for Managing Hazmat Incidents and senior editor of Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies, a standard text in medical toxicology. Dr. Goldfrank is a member of the Institute of Medicine and previously served on the Committee on Research and Development Needs for Improving Civilian Medical Response to Chemical and Biological Terrorism Incidents. JOSEPH BARBERA, M.D., is Co-Director of the George Washington University Institute for Crisis, Disaster, and Risk Management. He is an Associate Professor of Engineering and Clinical Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine at The George Washington University. Dr. Barbera is residency trained in emergency medicine and family medicine and has been involved in responses to hurricanes, the Oklahoma City bombing, mine disasters, earthquakes, and biological terrorism threats since 1986. Dr. Barbera has been the lead medical consultant for the Federal Emergency Management Agency in the development of the National Urban Search & Rescue Response System and has provided extensive consulta

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program tion to the U.S. Public Health Service and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs in the development of the National Disaster Medical System. As chair of the emergency preparedness committee for the George Washington University Hospital, Dr. Barbera oversaw implementation of a mass patient decontamination and treatment facility and worked with other hospitals to develop a similar capability for response to chemical terrorism. As founder and chair of the District of Columbia Hospital Association’s Emergency Preparedness Committee, Dr. Barbera led the implementation of a comprehensive Hospital Mutual Aid System for Washington, D.C., and has been instrumental in regional emergency planning and in coordinating disaster response exercises, including the medical participation in the federal Domestic Preparedness Program’s regional chemical and biological terrorism exercises. Dr. Barbera is a medical officer for the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance International Search & Rescue Program and also provides emergency management and medical preparedness consultation to the U.S. Capitol’s Office of the Attending Physician, including contingency planning for the presidential inauguration and state of the union addresses. He has provided emergency management expertise to multiple other organizations, including the White House medical staff, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and the Washington D.C. Veterans Affairs Medical Center. GEORGES C. BENJAMIN, M.D., was appointed secretary of Health and Mental Hygiene by Maryland Gov. Parris N. Glendening, effective May 1, 1999. He oversees an agency with more than 10,000 employees and a $4.2 billion budget. Dr. Benjamin is a graduate of the Illinois Institute of Technology and the University of Illinois College of Medicine. He is board certified in internal medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians. His previous career experience includes serving in administrative positions as chief of the Acute Illness Clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center, chief of Emergency Medicine at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, chairman of the Department of Community Health and Ambulatory Care at the District of Columbia General Hospital, and health commissioner for the District of Columbia. Dr. Benjamin leads the state’s public health efforts to combat biological and chemical terrorism and was a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Research and Development Needs for Improving Civilian Medical Response to Chemical and Biological Terrorism Incidents. JAMES BENTLEY, Ph.D., joined the American Hospital Association (AHA) in 1991 and is the Senior Vice President for Strategic Policy Planning at the AHA. He earned a B.A. in health facilities management from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in medical care organization from

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program the University of Michigan. Dr. Bentley’s current responsibilities include developing AHA policy on long-term public issues, leading AHA’s initiatives on workforce supply, and financing and accreditation of graduate and continuing medical education. Before joining AHA, Dr. Bentley spent 15 years with the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC). Initially responsible for legislative and regulatory activities affecting teaching hospitals, he concluded his AAMC career as Vice President of Clinical Services with responsibility for the association’s program of services for teaching hospitals and faculty practice plans. Dr. Bentley spent 5 years in the U.S. Navy Medical Service Corps and has been on the faculty of George Washington University, where he taught medical sociology and health care administration. In 1998 and 1999, Dr. Bentley was a member of the Board of Examiners for the Malcom Baldridge National Quality Award. He has served two terms as a member of the Board of Trustees of Holy Cross Health of Silver Spring, Maryland, and continues to serve on its Mission and Planning Committee. KENNETH I. BERNS, M.D., Ph.D. is President and Chief Executive Officer of Mount Sinai Medical Center. He is also a professor in the Departments of Microbiology and Gene Therapy. Dr. Berns completed his undergraduate requirements for biochemical sciences at Harvard University and received an A.B. with general honors in biology from Johns Hopkins University. He also earned a Ph.D. and an M.D. at Johns Hopkins University and completed his internship in pediatrics at Harriet Lane Service, Johns Hopkins Hospital. He has pioneered research on the mechanism of viral replication and has been a major contributor to understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying replication of single-stranded viral DNA, the integration of viral DNA into the host-cell genome, and viral latency. Dr. Berns has served as co-chair for the American Society for Microbiology’s Task Force on Bioterrorism, as well as for the Institute of Medicine’s Resource Sharing Committee. Dr. Berns is a member of both the Institute of Medicine and the National Academy of Sciences. RAYMOND M. DOWNEY (November 2000 to September 2001) was Chief of Rescue Operations in the New York City Fire Department’s Special Operations Command, where he was responsible for preparedness, training, and response to weapons of mass destruction incidents for the department until his death in the World Trade Center attack of September 11, 2001. The command, which includes 450 firefighters and officers in 25 special units, has fully equipped and trained 12 units to respond to such incidents. Chief Downey was a member of the Advisory Panel to Assess Domestic Response Capabilities for Terrorism Involving Weapons of Mass Destruction, also known as The Gilmore Commission. Mr. Downey lec-

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program tured nationally and internationally on terrorism and was one of the lead instructors at the First Worldwide Conference on Strengthening the Fire and Emergency Response to Terrorism. In addition to operating at the World Trade Center bombing in 1993, his disaster response experience included 16 days as the operations chief for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) at the Oklahoma City bombing, the Humberto Vidal gas explosion in Puerto Rico, and numerous other hurricanes, ice storms, and floods. Mr. Downey was the task force leaders’ representative to FEMA for all 28 Urban Search and Rescue teams in the National Response System, a member of FEMA’s Advisory Committee for Urban Search and Rescue, and author of the book The Rescue Company, published by Fire Engineering Books and Videos. FRANCES EDWARDS-WINSLOW, Ph.D., is the Director of the Office of Emergency Services for the City of San Jose, California, as well as the director of the San Jose Metropolitan Medical Task Force. Before assuming these positions, she served as Commissioner for the State of California Seismic Safety Commission. Dr. Edwards-Winslow received both a B.A. and an M.A. from Drew University. She later earned both a master of urban planning degree and a Ph.D. from New York University and a certificate in hazardous materials management from the University of California, Irvine. Dr. Winslow is a certified emergency manager and an instructor for the Federal Emergency Management Agency. She is also a member of the Stanford University Bio/Chem Warfare Working Group and a scholar for the Executive Session on Terrorism at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Edwards-Winslow is affiliated with the American Society for Public Administration, for which she has served on several committees including the National Policy Issues Committee and the Section on Emergency Management. LINDA F. FAIN served as the Disaster Assistance Coordinator for the California Department of Mental Health from 1987 until her retirement in October 2000. She developed and maintained the mental health section of the California emergency plan, provided training and technical assistance to local mental health departments, and designed and participated in federal, state, and local emergency exercises. A member of the faculty for Crisis Counseling Assistance workshops at the National Emergency Training Center and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Crisis Counseling Program Workgroup, she coordinated statewide response and recovery activities following 19 presidentially declared disasters, from application for federal funds to evaluation of program effectiveness, for which she received a FEMA Award for Exceptional Achievement.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program FRED HENRETIG, M.D., is the Director of the Section of Clinical Toxicology at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, a Pediatric Specialist on a Disaster Medical Assistance Team of the National Disaster Medical System for the U.S. Public Health Service, and Professor of Pediatrics and Emergency Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. He received his undergraduate education at University of Pennsylvania and an M.D. from Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Henretig completed a residency in pediatrics at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children in Philadelphia. In his 25 years of pediatric emergency medicine, Dr. Henretig has achieved such honors as being elected twice to the American College of Medical Toxicology Board of Directors and being appointed to the American Board of Pediatrics’ Medical Toxicology Subboard, which he chaired in 2000. Dr. Henretig’s recent special interests include biological and chemical terrorism issues, and he has completed a six-month sabbatical at the U.S. Army’s Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases with its biodefense group. DARRELL HIGUCHI is Deputy Fire Chief, Service Bureau, County of Los Angeles Fire Department. He also serves as the department coordinator for the Terrorism Awareness and Preparedness Program, working closely with federal, state, and local government agencies including the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Secret Service, and all branches of the armed forces. He is a member of the Interagency Board for Personal Protective Equipment and is the leader and administrator of the Los Angeles Metropolitan Medical Response System Task Force. Chief Higuchi began his 28 years on the County of Los Angeles Fire Department as a firefighter and paramedic and has held positions involving fire protection engineering, public affairs, and fire prevention. As Deputy Fire Chief for Operations, he was responsible for providing fire protection and emergency medical services to 31 cities and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. In his current position he commands the Fleet, Construction and Maintenance, and Command and Control Divisions, including the 911-command center and all communications equipment. Chief Higuchi is a graduate of California State University, Los Angeles, where he now holds an appointment as Associate Professor. He is a member of the International Association of Fire Chiefs, the National Fire Protection Association, and the American Association of Public Administration. ARNOLD M. HOWITT, Ph.D., is Executive Director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. He also serves part-time as Executive Director of the Cooperative Mobility Program, an international transpor-

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program tation research program based at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Dr. Howitt specializes in state and local public management and intergovernmental relations. Currently, he is directing a multiyear study of transportation and air quality policy making in the federal government and in 15 states, supported in part by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Federal Highway Administration. He is also exploring transportation and air quality issues on an international basis, particularly in Japan and Mexico. In addition, Dr. Howitt is codirector of a new Kennedy School research project for the U.S. Department of Justice on domestic preparedness for terrorism. Dr. Howitt has authored books and chapters on the federal grant-in-aid system, management capacity building, the political economy of land use exactions, going private, transportation economics and policy, and state growth management regulatory programs. Several years ago, he coauthored Stimulating Community Development, a 3-year study of housing and economic development activities by neighborhood development organizations in Boston, Chicago, Cleveland, Indianapolis, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and the South Bronx. He also directed a national assessment of state government programs to promote labor-management cooperation in private industry. Dr. Howitt earned a B.A. from Columbia University and an M.A. and Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. He has continuously served in faculty and administrative positions at Harvard since 1976, receiving the Fussa Distinguished Teaching Award from the Harvard Extension School in 1993. Since 1988, Dr. Howitt has also been a part-time faculty member at the Cascade Center for Public Service, Daniel J. Evans School of Public Affairs, University of Washington, Seattle. Previously, he was a faculty member at Brown University (1974–1976) and held a part-time appointment at the State University of New York at Albany (1984–1992). Dr. Howitt has extensive experience in executive education and has consulted with public agencies in several states and in the federal government. LAURA LEVITON, Ph.D., is the Senior Program Officer for Research and Evaluation at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. Dr. Leviton received a B.A. degree in psychology at Reed College and an M.A. and Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Kansas and was a postdoctoral fellow in Research and Training in Evaluation of Social Programs at Northwestern University. Dr. Leviton has been appointed to CDC National Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and has served as chair for the National Review Committee of HIV Prevention Evaluation Grants for the state of California. She has published two books, 10 chapters, and 50 refereed publications. Dr. Leviton has won several awards including the Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest from the

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program American Psychological Association. Dr. Leviton was a coinvestigator on the earliest and to date the largest randomized experiment on effective ways to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in gay and bisexual men. She is coauthor of two books: Foundations of Program Evaluation, a dominant advanced evaluation research text, and Confronting Public Health Risks. WILLIAM MYERS, M.S., retired from the post of Health Commissioner for the City of Columbus, Ohio, in February 2002 after 22 years of service in that role and 35 years of experience and knowledge in public health practice, planning principles, organizational change, communication, and developing community partnerships. Mr. Myers has an M.S. in preventive medicine from The Ohio State University and is a graduate of the Public Health Leadership Institute. He has held leadership positions with the National Association of County and City Health Officials and is a past president of the Ohio Public Health Association. Mr. Myers has served on national public health planning efforts and has made numerous presentations before nationwide bodies such as the National Commission on AIDS, the U.S. Conference of Mayors, and the American Public Health Association. Mr. Myers chaired the Columbus Metropolitan Medical Response System development committee. Mr. Myers believes in the principle that “all health is local” and has been an advocate for establishing local partnerships to help make Columbus the healthiest city in America. DENNIS M. PERROTTA, Ph.D., C.I.C., is State Epidemiologist and Chief of the Bureau of Epidemiology, Texas Department of Health. He has a doctorate in epidemiology, is board certified in infection control, and has worked in public health for more than 20 years spanning a wide range of subject areas from bioterrorism, asthma, and environmental health to infectious disease epidemiology. Dr. Perrotta recently served as president of the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists and as president of the Armed Forces Epidemiological Board. From 1997 to 1999 he served on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee to Improve Civilian Medical Response to Chemical and Biological Terrorism and is facilitating state health department efforts regarding bioterrorism preparedness. He is the principal investigator on a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention bioterrorism grant. JEFFREY L. RUBIN is the Chief of the Disaster Medical Services Division for the Emergency Medical Services Authority for the state of California. He obtained a B.S. in business administration-finance at California State University and performed graduate work in health care administration. Mr. Rubin is responsible for the development and maintenance of plans,

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program policies, and procedures governing state and local preparedness and response for major disasters involving mass casualties. He previously served as the manager of the EMT-Paramedic Licensure Program for the state of California and as a disaster medical program specialist and associate government program analyst. AMY E. SMITHSON, Ph.D. (November 2000 to July 2001) is a Senior Associate at the Henry L. Stimson Center and since 1993 has directed the Chemical and Biological Weapons Nonproliferation Project, which serves as an information clearinghouse, watchdog, and problem solver regarding chemical and biological weapons issues. Under its auspices, Dr. Smithson has conducted analytical research across the spectrum of complex topics associated with the control and elimination of chemical and biological weapons. Her most recent research inventories the various federal response assets and training and equipment programs addressing domestic terrorism, airs widespread feedback from the front lines on these federal efforts, and shares innovative ideas from local emergency personnel on coordination, plans, tactics, and capabilities for dealing with these type of incidents. She has published widely in journals, testified before the U.S. Congress, and is frequently consulted by the national news media. Previously at the Stimson Center, she worked on proposals for the use of cooperative aerial inspections that would enhance arms control verification, confidence-building regimes, and peacekeeping efforts. At that time, she coedited Open Skies, Arms Control, and Cooperative Security. Dr. Smithson was also the principal investigator for a project that examined the suitability of the U.S. government’s structure for addressing arms control issues in the post-Cold War era. Before joining the Stimson Center in 1990, she worked at Pacific-Sierra Research Corporation and the Center for Naval Analyses. She holds two bachelor’s degrees, in political science and Russian, from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, a master’s in international relations from Georgetown University (1984), and a doctorate in political science from George Washington University. DARREL STEPHENS is Chief of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department, Charlotte-Mecklenburg County, North Carolina. Chief Stephens was appointed Chief in September 1999. He was previously the City Administrator for the city of St. Petersburg, Florida. He also served as police chief in St. Petersburg from December 1992 to June 1997. He spent most of his career in policing, including over 6 years as the Executive Director of the Police Executive Research Forum, a Washington, D.C.-based association. He began his career in 1968 as a police officer with the Kansas City, Missouri, Police Department that included a 10-month visit-

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program ing fellowship at the National Institute of Justice in 1972. He became the Assistant Police Chief in Lawrence, Kansas, in 1976 and in 1979 accepted the Largo, Florida, Police Chief position. In 1983 he became Chief of Police in Newport News, Virginia. He holds a B.S. in the administration of justice from the University of Missouri–Kansas City and an M.S. in public administration from Central Missouri State University. IOM STAFF FREDERICK J. MANNING, Ph.D., is a Senior Program Officer in Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) Board on Health Sciences Policy and study director. In 8 years at IOM, he has served as study director for projects addressing a variety of topics including medical isotopes, potential hepatitis drugs, blood safety and availability, rheumatic disease, resource sharing in biomedical research, occupational safety and health, and chemical and biological terrorism. Before joining IOM, Dr. Manning spent 25 years in the U.S. Army Medical Research and Development Command, serving in positions that included Director of Neuropsychiatry at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research and Chief Research Psychologist for the Army Medical Department. Dr. Manning earned a Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard University in 1970, following undergraduate education at the College of the Holy Cross. REBECCA LOEFFLER is a project assistant for the Evaluation of Metropolitan Medical Response Systems study. She earned a B.S. in psychology, with a minor in biology and a concentration in animal behavior, from James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia. ANDREW POPE, Ph.D., is director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine. With expertise in physiology and biochemistry, his primary interests focus on environmental and occupational influences on human health. Dr. Pope’s previous research activities focused on the neuroendocrine and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed numerous studies on topics that include injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the enhancement of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. Most recently, Dr. Pope directed studies on priority-setting processes at the National Institutes of Health, fluid resuscitation practices in combat casualties, and organ procurement and transplantation.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program ALDEN CHANG is the administrative assistant for the Board on Health Sciences Policy. He began his career at the Institute of Medicine in February 1999 as project assistant for Safe Work in the 21st Century and has also worked on the Organ Procurement and Transplantation: Assessing Current Policies and the Potential Impact of the DHHS Final Rule study and the Forum on Emerging Infections. Mr. Chang earned a bachelor of arts degree in international relations from The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.