B
Selected Information About Federal Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Consequence Management Response Teams (Appendix II, General Accounting Office Report GAO-01-14)



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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program B Selected Information About Federal Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear Consequence Management Response Teams (Appendix II, General Accounting Office Report GAO-01-14)

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Response Team Mission Department of Defense   Joint Task Force for Civil Support Supports lead federal agency, establishes command and control of designated Department of Defense (DOD) forces, and provides military assistance to civil authorities to save lives, prevent human suffering, and provide temporary critical life support. Chemical/Biological Rapid Response Team Coordinates and integrates DOD’s technical assistance for the neutralization, containment, dismantlement, and disposal of chemical or biological materials, and assists first responders in dealing with consequence management. U.S. Army Technical Escort Unit Provides chemical/biological advice, assessment, sampling, detection, field verification, packaging, escort, and render safe for chemical/biological devices or hazards. U.S. Army Special Medical Augmentation Response Team—Nuclear/Biological/Chemical Provides technical advice in the detection, neutralization, and containment of chemical, biological, or radiological hazardous materials in a terrorist event. U.S. Army Special Medical Augmentation Response Team—Aero-Medical Isolation Provides a rapid response evacuation unit to any area of the world to transport and provide patient care under conditions of biological containment to service members or U. S. civilians exposed to certain contagious and highly dangerous diseases. U.S. Marine Corps Chemical-Biological Incident Response Force Provides force protection or mitigation in the event of a terrorist incident, domestically or overseas. U.S. Army Radiological Advisory Medical Team Assists and furnishes radiological health hazard guidance to the on-scene commander or other responsible officials at an incident site and the installation medical authority.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Cited Authority Number of Team (dedicated/collateral) Members and Team’s Primary Location Transportation Mode Established Oct. 1, 1999 by Secretary of Defense directive. Sixty dedicated personnel located at Fort Monroe, Va. Travels by military aircraft or ground transportation. Initial team deploys within 4 hours. Secretary of Defense directive based on the Defense Against Weapons of Mass Destruction Act of 1996 and Fiscal Year 1997 National Defense Authorization Act. Fourteen dedicated personnel located at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md. Travels by commercial or military aircraft or ground transportation. Initial team deploys within 4 hours, and remainder of team deploys in 10 to 12 hours. Chemical Warfare Service directive dated Jan. 20, 1943. One hundred ninety-three dedicated personnel located at Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md.; Fort Belvoir, Va; Pine Bluff, Ark.; and Dugway, Ut. Travels by military aircraft or ground transportation. Team deploys in 4 hours. Established in 1998 by U.S. Army Surgeon General directive. Six teams located at various sites with six collateral duty members per team. Travels by military aircraft or ground transportation in 12 hours. Established in 1977 by U.S. Army Surgeon General directive. Approximately 20 collateral duty personnel at Fort Detrick, Md. Travels by military aircraft. Established in Apr. 1996 by the U.S. Marine Corps Commandant’s planning guidance. Three hundred seventy-three dedicated personnel at Indian Head, Md. Travels by military aircraft or ground transportation. Initial team deploys in 6 hours, and remainder of team deploys in 24 hours. Army Regulation 40-13, Feb. 1, 1985. Eight to 10 collateral duty personnel located at Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washington, D.C. Travels by military transportation, commercial aircraft, or personal vehicles within 8 hours.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Response Team Mission Department of Health and Human Services Management Support Teams Manage federal medical teams and assets that are deployed in response to an incident. National Medical Response Teams Decontaminate casualties resulting from a hazardous materials incident, provide medical care, and deploy with pharmaceutical cache of antidotes and medical equipment. Disaster Medical Assistance Teams Provide emergency medical care during a disaster or other event. Disaster Mortuary Operational Response Teams Provide identification and mortuary services to state and local health officials upon request in the event of major disasters and emergencies. National Pharmaceutical Stockpile Resupplies state and local public health agencies with pharmaceuticals and other medical treatments in the event of a terrorist incident.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Cited Authority Number of Team (dedicated/collateral) Members and Team’s Primary Location Transportation Mode National Security Decision Directive 47, 1982; Federal Response Plan; Presidential Decision Directives 39 and 62. Six to eight dedicated personnel located at Rockville, Md., supplemented by 18 to 20 collateral duty Department of Veterans Affairs personnel. Travels by commercial or military aircraft. Initial team (2 to 5 members) expected to be ready to deploy within 2 hours and arrive within 12 hours. Full team expected to arrive within 12 to 24 hours. Federal Response Plan; Presidential Decision Directives 39 and 62. Four teams located at Washington, D.C. (non-deployable); Winston-Salem, N.C.; Denver, Colo.; and Los Angeles, Calif., with 36 collateral duty members per team. Travels by commercial or military aircraft or ground transportation. Expected to be ready to deploy within 3 hours and arrive within 12 hours. National Security Decision Directive 47; Public Health Service memorandum of understanding with each team and team sponsor; Federal Response Plan; Presidential Decision Directives 39 and 62. Forty-four teams at various locations nationwide with 34 collateral duty members per team. Travels by commercial or military aircraft or ground transportation. Expected to be ready to deploy within 3 to 4 hours and arrive within 12 to 24 hours. Federal Response Plan; Presidential Decision Directives 39 and 62; Public Health Service/ National Association for Search and Rescue memorandum of understanding. Ten teams at various locations nationwide with 25 to 31 collateral duty members per team. Travels by commercial aircraft or ground transportation. Expected to be ready to deploy within 4 hours and at the site within 6 to 12 hours. P.L. 105-277: Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Appropriations Act of 1999. Four to six dedicated personnel located at Atlanta, Ga. Travels by commercial, charter, or military aircraft. Expected to arrive within 12 hours.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Response Team Mission Department of Energy Radiological Assistance Program Teams Assist federal agencies, state and local governments, private business, or individuals in incidents involving radiological materials. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Centera Collects, evaluates, interprets, and distributes off-site radiological data in support of the lead federal agency, state and local governments. Coordinates federal resources in responding to the off-site monitoring and assessment needs at the scene of a radiological emergency. Aerial Measuring System Detects, measures, and tracks ground and airborne radioactivity over large areas using fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft. Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site Provides medical advice and on-site assistance in triage, diagnosis, and treatment of all types of radiation exposure events. Department of Transportation U.S. Coast Guard National Strike Teams Respond to oil and hazardous substance pollution incidents in and around waterways to protect public health and the environment. Area of responsibility includes all Coast Guard Districts and Federal Response Regions. Support Environmental Protection Agency’s On-Scene Coordinators for inland area incidents.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Cited Authority Number of Team (dedicated/collateral) Members and Team’s Primary Location Transportation Mode Established in the late 1950s under the Atomic Energy Commission. Twenty-six teams at various locations nationwide with seven collateral duty members per team. Normally travels by ground transportation but can deploy by commercial aircraft. Expected to arrive within 2 to 6 hours. Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. Team members deploy in phases. Phases I (15 members) and II (45 members) consist of collateral duty Department of Energy personnel from Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., and other locations. Phase III (known as Full Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center) involves multiple federal agencies and may have 150 or more personnel from various federal agencies. Travels by military, commercial, or Department of Energy-owned aircraft. Expected to arrive within 4 to 8 hours (phase I), 11 hours (phase II), and 24 to 36 hours (phase III). Established in the early 1950s as a U.S. Geological Survey program to support the Atomic Energy Commission. Five to 10 dedicated and collateral duty personnel located at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., and Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Initial team travels in fixed-wing aircraft and is expected to arrive within 4 to 8 hours. Established in 1976 under an agreement between the Energy Research and Development Administration and a local hospital. Four to eight dedicated personnel located in Oak Ridge, Tenn. Travels by commercial or charter aircraft. Expected to be ready to deploy within 4 hours. Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972; National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 C.F. R. 300); Oil Pollution Act of 1990. Three teams located in Fort Dix, N.J.; Mobile, Ala.; and Novato, Calif., with 35 to 39 dedicated members per team. Travels by military aircraft or ground transportation. Expected to deploy within 1 to 6 hours and arrive within 12 hours.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Response Team Mission U.S. Coast Guard On-Scene Coordinators Coordinate all containment, removal and disposal efforts during a hazardous release incident in coastal or major navigational waterways. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Emergency Radiological Response Team Provides technical advice, radiological monitoring, decontamination expertise, and medical care as a supplement to an institutional health care provider. Environmental Protection Agency On-Scene Coordinators Direct response efforts and coordinate all other efforts at the scene of a hazardous materials discharge or release. Environmental Response Team Provides technical support for assessing, managing, and disposing of hazardous waste. Radiological Emergency Response Team Provides mobile laboratories for field analysis of samples and technical expertise in radiation monitoring, radiation health physics, and risk assessment.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Cited Authority Number of Team (dedicated/collateral) Members and Team’s Primary Location Transportation Mode National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 C.F.R. 300). Approximately 50 dedicated personnel in pre-designated Coast Guard regional zones at various locations nationwide. Travels by ground transportation. On-call 24 hours. Response time depends on location of incident site. Executive Order 12657: Federal Emergency Management Agency Assistance In Emergency Preparedness Planning at Commercial Nuclear Power Plants; Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. Twenty-one to 23 collateral duty personnel are located at various sites nationwide. Travels by commercial aircraft. Expected to be ready to deploy within 6 hours and arrive within 12 to 24 hours. National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 C.F.R. 300). Approximately 200 dedicated personnel, plus contractor support, at various locations nationwide. Travels by commercial aircraft or ground transportation. Coordinators and contractors are on-call 24 hours. Response time depends on location of incident site. National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 C.F.R. 300). Twenty-two dedicated personnel, plus contractor support, located in Edison, N.J., and Cincinnati, Ohio. Travels by commercial aircraft. Advance team expected to deploy within 4 hours. Full team expected to arrive within 24 to 48 hours. National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 C.F.R. 300) As many as 60 collateral duty personnel located in Las Vegas, Nev., and Montgomery, Ala. Travels by ground transportation or military air. Expected to arrive within 2 to 3 days.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Response Team Mission Federal Emergency Management Agency Emergency Response Team Coordinates federal response and recovery activities within a state. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regional Incident Response Teams Carry out the responsibilities and functions of the lead federal agency during incidents at licensed facilities such as nuclear power plants. a The Department of Energy has the lead responsibility for coordinating the Federal Radiological Monitoring Assessment Center during the early phase of an emergency. The Environmental Protection Agency assumes control during later phases. Note: Agency officials define deployment time as the number of hours in which team members receive notification to leave for an incident and their arrival at their place of departure.

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Preparing for Terrorism: Tools for Evaluating the Metropolitan Medical Response System Program Cited Authority Number of Team (dedicated/collateral) Members and Team’s Primary Location Transportation Mode     Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act, 42 U.S.C. 5121 et. seq. Size is dependent on the severity and magnitude of the incident. Collateral duty team members are geographically dispersed at Federal Emergency Management Agency headquarters and 10 regional offices. Travels by commercial, charter, or military aircraft, or ground transportation. Expected to arrive within 24 hours.     Public Law 96-295, dated June 30, 1980; Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan. Four teams located in Atlanta, Ga.; Lisle, Ill.; Arlington, Tex.; and King of Prussia, Penn., with 25 to 30 collateral duty members per team. Travels by commercial or charter aircraft or ground transportation. Initial team expected to arrive within 6 to 12 hours. They define arrival time as the number of hours in which the team is expected to reach the incident site after receiving notification. Department of Defense officials provided only deployment times for their teams. Source: Our analysis and discussions with agency officials.