What Can Teachers Do?

  • Be committed to the idea that all children can become proficient in math.

  • Develop and deepen your understanding of math, of student thinking, and of techniques that promote math proficiency.

  • Emphasize to policy makers, administrators, parents, and students the need for and the achievability of math proficiency.

  • Use an instructional program and materials that, based on the best available scientific evidence, support the development of math proficiency.

  • Teach mathematics for a sufficient amount of time (e.g., an hour a day).

  • Attend professional development activities that integrate math, student thinking, and instructional techniques.

  • Advocate for ongoing, sustained, coherent professional development activities that support teaching for math proficiency.

  • Organize and participate in study groups at your school that focus on teaching practice.

  • Engage in conversations with colleagues about developing proficiency and about students and their math proficiency.

  • Become a mentor to a colleague learning to teach for math proficiency.



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Helping Children Learn Mathematics What Can Teachers Do? Be committed to the idea that all children can become proficient in math. Develop and deepen your understanding of math, of student thinking, and of techniques that promote math proficiency. Emphasize to policy makers, administrators, parents, and students the need for and the achievability of math proficiency. Use an instructional program and materials that, based on the best available scientific evidence, support the development of math proficiency. Teach mathematics for a sufficient amount of time (e.g., an hour a day). Attend professional development activities that integrate math, student thinking, and instructional techniques. Advocate for ongoing, sustained, coherent professional development activities that support teaching for math proficiency. Organize and participate in study groups at your school that focus on teaching practice. Engage in conversations with colleagues about developing proficiency and about students and their math proficiency. Become a mentor to a colleague learning to teach for math proficiency.