Appendix A
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

JOHN P.HOLDREN (NAS, NAE), Chair, is the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy and Director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy in the John F.Kennedy School of Government, as well as Professor of Environmental Science and Public Policy in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, at Harvard University. Trained in aeronautics/astronautics and plasma physics at MIT and Stanford, he previously co-founded and co-led for 23 years the campus-wide interdisciplinary graduate degree program in energy and resources at the University of California, Berkeley. He was employed as a plasma physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1970 until 1972, and has been a consultant to that laboratory continuously since that time. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and he chairs the NAS Committee on International Security and Arms Control (which has conducted recent major studies of the future of U.S. nuclear weapons policy and of the management of surplus nuclear-weapon materials) and the NAS/NAE Committee on US/India Cooperation on Energy. He was a member of President Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) from 1994 to 2001 and chaired PCAST reports on protection of nuclear materials in Russia, the U.S. fusion-energy R&D program, U.S. energy R&D strategy, and international cooperation on energy.


HAROLD M.AGNEW (NAS, NAE) is former President of General Atomics, and a former Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is well-known for his pioneering contributions to weapons engineering. He has participated in numerous advisory capacities to such groups as the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the White House Science Council. He was Chairman of the General Advisory Committee to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency during the Nixon administration and a member during the Carter administration. Dr. Agnew served two terms as a New Mexico State Senator. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society, and is the recipient of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award and the Enrico Fermi Award from the Department of Energy.



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Technical Issues Related to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members JOHN P.HOLDREN (NAS, NAE), Chair, is the Teresa and John Heinz Professor of Environmental Policy and Director of the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy in the John F.Kennedy School of Government, as well as Professor of Environmental Science and Public Policy in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, at Harvard University. Trained in aeronautics/astronautics and plasma physics at MIT and Stanford, he previously co-founded and co-led for 23 years the campus-wide interdisciplinary graduate degree program in energy and resources at the University of California, Berkeley. He was employed as a plasma physicist at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from 1970 until 1972, and has been a consultant to that laboratory continuously since that time. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and he chairs the NAS Committee on International Security and Arms Control (which has conducted recent major studies of the future of U.S. nuclear weapons policy and of the management of surplus nuclear-weapon materials) and the NAS/NAE Committee on US/India Cooperation on Energy. He was a member of President Clinton’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST) from 1994 to 2001 and chaired PCAST reports on protection of nuclear materials in Russia, the U.S. fusion-energy R&D program, U.S. energy R&D strategy, and international cooperation on energy. HAROLD M.AGNEW (NAS, NAE) is former President of General Atomics, and a former Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is well-known for his pioneering contributions to weapons engineering. He has participated in numerous advisory capacities to such groups as the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the White House Science Council. He was Chairman of the General Advisory Committee to the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency during the Nixon administration and a member during the Carter administration. Dr. Agnew served two terms as a New Mexico State Senator. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Physical Society, and is the recipient of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award and the Enrico Fermi Award from the Department of Energy.

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Technical Issues Related to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty RICHARD L.GARWIN (NAS, NAE, IOM) is the Phillip D.Reed Senior Fellow for Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations, New York, and an emeritus Fellow at the T.J.Watson Research Center of IBM. His expertise in experimental and computation physics includes contributions to nuclear weapons design, instruments and electronics for nuclear and low-temperature physics, computer elements and systems, superconducting devices, communications systems, behavior of solid helium, and detection of gravitational radiation. He was a member of the President’s Science Advisory Committee from 1962–65 and 1969–72, and of the Defense Science Board from 1966–69. He currently consults for the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the Council on Foreign Relations, and is an active member of the JASONs. In 1998, he was a member of the 9-person Rumsfeld Commission to Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States. He has written extensively on nuclear-weapons-related issues over the course of several decades, particularly on the question of maintaining the nuclear stockpile under a comprehensive test ban regime. He chaired the State Department’s Arms Control and Nonproliferation Advisory Board from 1993 to August, 2001. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and a member of the American Philosophical Society. RAYMOND JEANLOZ is a Professor in Earth and Planetary Science and in Astronomy, and is Executive Director of the Miller Institute for Basic Research in Science at the University of California at Berkeley. His expertise is in the properties of materials at high pressures and temperatures and in the nature of planetary interiors, for which he received a MacArthur Award. He serves on the University of California’s President’s Council and National Security Panel, is a member of the National Nuclear Security Administration Advisory Committee and of JASON, and chairs the NRC Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Geophysical Union. SPURGEON M.KEENY, JR. is Senior Fellow, National Academy of Sciences. He served as an Air Force officer and civilian in the Directorate of Intelligence, HQ, USAF (1948–1954) in charge of the Special Weapons Section, responsible for intelligence on the Soviet nuclear weapons program and represented the Air Force on the Joint Atomic Energy Intelligence Committee, which produced national estimates of Soviet capabilities. Starting in 1956, he was in charge of the Atomic Energy Division, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Research and Engineering, Department of Defense, and was a member of the Gaither Security Resources Panel. In 1958, he was a delegate to the Geneva Conference of Experts on Nuclear Test Detection and subsequently to the negotiations on the Discontinuance of Nuclear Weapon Tests (1958–1960). From 1958 to 1969 he served as the technical assistant to the President’s Science Advisor and concurrently from 1963 to 1969 as a senior member of the National Security Council staff, responsible for arms control and nuclear programs and policy. In 1965, he was staff director of the (Gilpatric) Presidential Committee on Nuclear Proliferation. From 1969 to 1973, he was Assistant Director of the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA), responsible for backstopping the SALT I negotiations, and from 1973 to 1977 he was Director, Policy and Program Development, MITRE Corporation and Chairman of the Nuclear Energy Policy Study Group which produced the report Nuclear Power Issues and Choices. From 1977 to 1981 he was Deputy Director of ACDA, responsible for backstopping the SALT II and Comprehensive Test Ban negotiations. From 1981 to 1985 he was the NAS scholar-in-residence. From 1985 to 2001 he was President

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Technical Issues Related to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and Executive Director of the Arms Control Association. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Physical Society, and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. ADMIRAL CHARLES LARSON (USN, ret.) is a graduate of the U.S. Naval Academy. During his naval career he was a nuclear submarine commander and commander of submarine forces, served two tours as Superintendent of the U.S. Naval Academy (1983–86; 1994–98), was commander of the U.S. Pacific Fleet (190–91), and Commander in Chief of the unified U.S. Pacific Command (1991–94). He has been involved in arms control and nuclear weapons policy issues as a Flag Officer (Admiral) from 1979 to the present time (SALT to START III). He is currently a senior fellow at the Center for Naval Analyses. ALBERT NARATH (NAE) retired in 1998 from his position as President and Chief Operating Officer, Energy and Environment Sector, Lockheed Martin Corporation. Prior to assuming that position, he was President of the Sandia Corporation and Director of the Sandia National Laboratories. Narath’s active interests include federal science and technology policy, nuclear fuel cycle safety and environmental issues, and national security and arms control. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served on numerous NRC committees, including the Materials Science and Engineering Steering Committee and the Solid State Sciences Committee. He was appointed as a member of CISAC in 1998. Narath chaired, among other studies and committees, DOE’s Fundamental Classification Review Group, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Advisory Board, and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory’s Advanced Light Source Program Policy Committee. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. WOLFGANG K.H. (PIEF) PANOFSKY (NAS) is Professor and Director Emeritus at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) of Stanford University. He served as Director of SLAC during the period 1961–1984. His field of expertise is experimental high-energy physics. He was a member of the President’s Science Advisory Committee under Presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy, and the General Advisory Committee on Arms Control to the President under President Carter. He has also served on the NRC Committee to Provide Interim Oversight of DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex, the DOE Panel on Nuclear Warhead Dismantlement and Special Nuclear Materials Controls, and the NRC Committee on Declassification of Information for the Department of Energy’s Environmental Remediation and Related Programs. He has served on ad hoc committees reviewing the directors of the DOE weapons laboratories for the University of California. He consults for Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, and is a current member of the JASONs. He was the Chairman of the Comprehensive Review Committee of the R&D Program of NN of the DOE. He is a current member and former Chairman of the NAS’s Committee for International Security and Arms Control (CISAC) and chaired its study on management and disposition of excess plutonium. PAUL G.RICHARDS is Mellon Professor of the Natural Sciences, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, and former chairman of Geological Sciences at the university. He served on the NRC Panels on Seismological Data and Research Requirements for a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (1994–1995; 1995–1997) and was a member of the NRC Committee on Seismology. He was a Foster Fellow at the U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (1984–

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Technical Issues Related to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty 85 and 1993–94) and served as a member of the Red Team advising the Agency on the capability of the U.S. to verify compliance with the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (1997–1998). He spent a sabbatical at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (1989–90). During the CTBT negotiations in Geneva he presented an experts paper (1994) for the U.S. on the problems posed by chemical explosions. He is a fellow of the American Geophysical Union and former president of its seismology section. Dr. Richards is currently a member of the Board of the Seismological Society of America. SEYMOUR SACK retired in 1990 after a career at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he still consults. In his career he specialized in nuclear weapons design. He played a major role in the design of the “physics package” of many of the nuclear weapons in the current U.S. arsenal, and managed the development of two weapons systems still in the current stockpile. He participated in the JASON 1995 study on maintaining the nuclear stockpile under a comprehensive test ban. He is a recipient of the E.O. Lawrence Award (1973) from DOE and the Fleet Ballistic Missile Achievement Award from the U.S. Navy’s Strategic Systems Program (1997). ALVIN W.TRIVELPIECE (NAE) is a consultant at Sandia National Laboratories. Previously he was President, Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation and Director, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (1989–2000). He was Executive Director of the AAAS (1987–1988), and the Director (1981–1987) of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Research (now Science). He was the Head-of-Delegation to the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy meeting between the United States and the Soviet Union (1986). He served as Chairman of the NAS Mathematical Science Education Board (1990–1995) and has served on numerous NRC committees. His formal training is in electrical engineering and physics. His research specialties include plasma physics, microwave devices, and particle accelerators.