APPENDIXES



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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering APPENDIXES

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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering This page in the original is blank.

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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering Contributors NICHOLAS M. DONOFRIO leads the strategy for developing and commercializing advanced technology for IBM’s global operations. His responsibilities include overseeing IBM research, the Global Integrated Supply Chain Team, the Integrated Product Development Team, and the Import Compliance Office. He also leads IBM’s worldwide quality initiatives. He is chairman of IBM’s Corporate Technology Council, chairman of the Board of Governors for the IBM Academy of Technology, a member of IBM’s Corporate Development Committee, and a member of the IBM Chairman’s Council. Mr. Donofrio spent the early part of his career in microprocessor development as a designer of logic and memory chips. Mr. Donofrio is a strong advocate of education, particularly in mathematics and science, the keys to economic competitiveness. His focus is on advancing education, employment, and career opportunities for underrepresented minorities and women. He is a member of the Board of Directors for the National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering, a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Mr. Donofrio earned a B.S. in electrical engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and an M.S., also in electrical engineering, from Syracuse University. In 1999, he was awarded an honorary doctorate in engineering from Polytechnic University. In 2002, he was awarded the IEEE Mensforth International Gold Medal for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of manufacturing engineering. (nmd@us.ibm.com) RONALD S. FEARING is a professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, which he joined in January 1988. His principle research interests are in microrobotics,

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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering tactile sensing, teletaction, and dextrous manipulation. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford in electrical engineering (1988), and an S.B. and S.M. in electrical engineering and computer science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1983). He was the recipient of the Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1991. (ronf@eecs.berkeley.edu) ANDREA GOLDSMITH is an associate professor of electrical engineering at Stanford University. She received her B.S. (1986), M.S. (1991), and Ph.D. (1994) in electrical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. From 1986 to 1990 she was affiliated with Maxim Technologies, where she worked on packet radio and satellite communication systems; from 1991 to 1992 she was affiliated with AT&T Bell Laboratories, where she worked on microcell modeling and channel estimation. Before joining the faculty at Stanford, she was an assistant professor of electrical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. Dr. Goldsmith’s research has been focused on capacity of wireless channels, wireless communication theory, adaptive modulation and coding, joint source and channel coding, cellular system design and resource allocation, and ad-hoc wireless networks. She is a Terman Faculty Fellow at Stanford and a recipient of the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, the National Science Foundation CAREER Development Award, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, a National Semiconductor Faculty Development Award, an Okawa Foundation Award, and the David Griep Memorial Prize from U.C. Berkeley. She is an editor for the IEEE Transactions on Communications and the IEEE Wireless Communications Magazine. (andrea@ee.stanford.edu) JEFFREY W. HAMSTRA has 17 years of experience in propulsion/airframe integration and is currently senior manager of the Propulsion Systems Branch at Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company in Fort Worth, Texas. Previous positions include group chief, Propulsion and Thermodynamics; lead engineer, Propulsion Technology; and lead engineer, Special Aircraft Programs. He has also acted as program manager for several propulsion integration R&D contracts. After graduating from the University of Michigan with an MSAE (1984) and BSAE (1983), Mr. Hamstra began his professional career as an inlet systems engineer on the F-22 program. His recent publications include, “Active Inlet Flow Control Technology Demonstration” (ICA 2000-6112) and “Fluidic Throat Skewing for Thrust Vectoring in Fixed Geometry Nozzles” (AIAA 99-0365). He holds three U.S. patents, is vice chair of the AIAA Air Breathing Propulsion Committee, and is a member of the ASME/IGTI Aircraft Engine Committee. (jeffrey.w.hamstra@lmco.com) MIRIAM HELLER is currently the program director of the Infrastructure and Information Systems Program in the Civil and Mechanical Systems Program of the National Science Foundation. Prior to that she was an assistant professor in

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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering the Department of Industrial Engineering at the University of Houston. She has a Ph.D. in environmental systems analysis from the Johns Hopkins University. As a Fulbright Scholar during the 1999–2000 academic year, Dr. Heller conducted research in France in industrial ecology. Her interdisciplinary work in civil infrastructure and industrial ecology is based on her background in operations research, systems engineering, artificial intelligence, information technology, and environmental science. She has also held several positions in the private sector, including Citicorp Credit Services and Digital Equipment Corporation. Her research on building bridges between industry and academia through courses, projects, and professional service has been funded by both public and private sector sources. (mheller@nsf.gov) RAJIV LAROIA is a founder of Flarion Technologies in Bedminster, New Jersey. As the company’s chief technology officer, he is responsible for setting product direction and overseeing all R&D. Prior to launching Flarion Technologies, he was with Lucent Technologies Bell Laboratories. In 1997, he became head of Bell Labs’ Digital Communications Research Department in the Wireless Research Center, where he and his team worked on the initial development of a flash-OFDM, technology-based, wireless data system. Dr. Laroia’s years at Bell Labs have generated numerous publications and more than 15 patents (granted and pending) with a total patent licensing revenue of more than $25 million. From 1994 to 1997, he was the associate editor of IEEE Transactions on Information Theory. He received his Ph.D. (1992) and M.S. (1989) from the University of Maryland, College Park and a B.S. (1985) from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi—all in electrical engineering. His thesis contributed to V.34, the ITU voiceband modem international standard, and led to a patent that has generated more than $2 million for the University of Maryland, College Park. In 1992, he was the recipient of the Best Graduate Student of the Year Award at the University of Maryland. He is a fellow of the IEEE. (laroia@flarion.com) DANIEL N. MILLER has 15 years of experience with propulsion/airframe integration. For the last five years he has been the advanced-propulsion principle investigator for Lockheed Martin Advanced Development Programs (the “Skunk Works”). Before that he was assigned to several advanced aircraft projects, including the National Aerospace Plane Program. Mr. Miller has B.S.M.E. and M.S.M.E. degrees from the University of Wisconsin, holds four U.S. patents, is the author of numerous technical publications, and is a member of the AIAA Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee, the Flow Control Committee, and the Flow Control Working Group. (daniel.n.miller@lmco.com) STEPHEN J. MORRIS, president of MLB Company in Palo Alto, California, has been designing, building and flight-testing small unmanned aircraft for more than 15 years. He conducted research on oblique-wing aircraft and led the design

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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering and construction of the oblique-all-wing demonstrator that was test flown in 1994. Dr. Morris was a member of the Stanford team that won the 1995 International Aerial Robotics Competition and winner of the 1997 and 1998 ISSMO Micro Air Vehicle Competition. He is also the chief of design for Bright Star Gliders, a manufacturer of hang gliders. Dr. Morris has a B.S. in mechanical engineering from Bucknell University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from Stanford University. (mlbco@mindspring.com) S. MUTHUKRISHNAN is a technical consultant at AT&T Labs and an associate professor at Rutgers University. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, in 1994 and was a postdoctoral visitor at DIMACS, a consortium of Princeton and Rutgers University funded by the National Science Foundation, working on algorithms for computational biology. He was on the faculty at the University of Warwick, U.K., and later joined Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies, where he worked on algorithmic issues in databases and wireless systems. His work at AT&T Research involved developing wireless applications and infrastructure solutions for the AT&T wireless network. His work on enabling location-based services has been tested in the AT&T network and was covered by CBS and MSNBC. Dr. Muthukrishnan has published more than 80 papers on a wide range of subjects, including networking, databases, computational biology, and theoretical computer science. He has been granted seven patents with several pending. He has served on the program committees of various Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) conferences and is co-chair of a three-year project at DIMACS on next-generation networking and applications. (muthu@research.att.comormuthu@cs.rutgers@edu) LINDA K. NOZICK, an associate professor in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Cornell University, joined the faculty at Cornell after completing her doctorate at the University of Pennsylvania. She has also been a visiting associate professor in the Operations Research Department (1998–1999) at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and a visiting professor in the General Motors Global R&D Center in Warren, Michigan (1998). She is a member of INFORMS, the Production and Operations Management Society, and the Transportation Research Board of the National Research Council. Dr. Nozick has served on the Editorial Advisory Board of Transportation Research (Part A) and is currently an associate editor of Naval Research Logistics. She was recipient of a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PE-CASE) in 1997 and the James and Mary Tien Excellence in Teaching Award in 1996. Her primary research interest is the development of mathematical models for the management of complex systems. (LKN3@cornell.edu)

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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering THOMAS PATERSON is chief scientific officer at Entelos, Inc., in Scotts Valley, California, where he leads the development of principles and methodologies for biologic systems modeling. He also pioneered the synthesis of system dynamics and decision analysis, which led to applications for pharmaceutical discovery and development in immune systems dysfunction, infectious diseases, and several other biologic areas. Before joining Entelos, Mr. Paterson held leadership positions at SDG, GTE Government Systems, and the Institute for Defense Analysis. He received an S.B. in aeronautics and astronautics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and an M.S. in decision analysis from Stanford University. (paterson@entelos.com) P. HUNTER PECKHAM is professor of biomedical engineering and director of the Rehabilitation Engineering Center at Case Western Reserve University (CWRU). He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Clarkson College of Technology, Potsdam, New York, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in biomedical engineering from CWRU. He is also director of the Veterans Affairs Center of Excellence in Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES), a consortium involving the Cleveland VA Medical Center, CWRU, and MetroHealth Medical Center. The FES center focuses on the clinical development and implementation of systems to restore control of movement in paralysis. Dr. Peckham’s research is focused on rehabilitation engineering and neuroprostheses, specifically functional restoration of the paralyzed upper extremity in individuals with spinal cord injuries. He and his collaborators have developed implantable neural prostheses that use electrical stimulation to control neuromuscular activation and have implemented procedures to provide control of grasp-release in individuals with tetraplegia; this function enables individuals with central nervous system disabilities to perform essential activities of daily living. He is currently working on the integration of technological rehabilitation and surgery to restore functional capabilities. (pxp2@po.cwru.edu) FENIOSKY PEÑA-MORA, associate professor of information technology and project management in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department’s Intelligent Engineering Systems Group at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), is the leader of the DaVinci Agent Society Initiative at MIT, and the author of several publications on computer-supported design, computer-supported engineering design and construction, project control, and management of large-scale engineering systems. He was the recipient of a 1999 National Science Foundation CAREER Award and a 1999 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). Dr. Peña-Mora has been a consultant for industry and government in Argentina, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Japan, Puerto Rico, and the United States and is the chief technology officer for Peña Alcántara Consultants, a firm that specializes in project management and information technology. He was the cofounder and chief technology

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Seventh Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering officer for inMeeting, an Internet company that specializes in managing collaborative sessions on multiple devices. Dr. Peña-Mora was chief information technology consultant for the project director of the Boston Central Artery/Third Harbor Tunnel Project; his role was to provide information technology support for change management and process integration during the design and construction stages of this $13.6 billion, decade-long, regional engineering project. (feniosky@mit.edu) GREGORY J. POTTIE received his B.Sc. in engineering physics from Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, in 1984, and his M.Eng. and Ph.D. in electrical engineering from McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, in 1985 and 1988 respectively. From 1989 to 1991, he worked at Motorola/Codex on projects related to voice-band modems and digital subscriber lines. In 1991, he joined the faculty of the Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where he is now professor and vice-chair for graduate programs. His research interests include channel-coding theory, wireless communication systems, and wireless sensor networks; current projects include the design of robust links in mobile networks and investigation of information theoretic issues in sensor networks. From 1997 to 1999, Dr. Pottie was secretary to the Board of Governors for the IEEE Information Theory Society. In 1998, he was named the Faculty Researcher of the Year for the UCLA School of Engineering and Applied Science. Dr. Pottie is cofounder of Sensoria Corporation. (pottie@ee.ucla.edu) MEHMET TONER is associate professor of surgery and bioengineering at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and a member of the senior scientific staff at the Shriners Burns Hospital. At MGH, he is associate director of the Center for Engineering in Medicine and director of the Microsystems Bioengineering Core Facility. Dr. Toner received a B.S. from Istanbul Technical University and an M.S. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, both in mechanical engineering. He completed his Ph.D. in medical engineering at Harvard University-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology in 1989. Dr. Toner is associate editor of the Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, associate editor of the Annual Reviews in Biomedical Engineering, a member of the editorial boards of Cryobiology and Cryo-Letters and a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of Organogenesis, Inc., a tissue-engineering company. He is also a member of the National Program Committee of the Biomedical Engineering Society and president-elect of the Society for Cryobiology. His contributions to bioengineering have been recognized by the YC Fung Young Faculty Award in Bioengineering from the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1994, and the John F. and Virginia B. Taplin Faculty Fellow Award from Harvard and MIT. Dr. Toner recently became a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering. (mtoner@sbi.org)