Appendix B Committee Member and Staff Biographies

Craig Partridge,Chair, is a chief scientist at BBN Technologies (a Verizon company), where he leads a variety of Internet-related research efforts. His current major projects involve an innovative way to trace Internet packets to their origin and the use of signal processing techniques to perform traffic analysis. In the mid-1980s, Dr. Partridge designed the process by which Internet e-mail is routed. He is the chairman of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group in Data Communication (one of the two major professional societies in data communications). He is the former editor-in-chief of ACM’s Computer Communication Review and of the IEEE Network Magazine, and a consulting editor for Addison-Wesley’s Professional Computing series. A member of the technical advisory boards of Matrix.Net and Arbor Networks, Dr. Partridge is a former consulting professor at Stanford University and he spent 1990 as a visiting research fellow at the Swedish Institute of Computer Science. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and holds A.B., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. Dr. Partridge was a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) committee that authored The Internet’s Coming of Age, and he is also a member of CSTB’s Committee on Internet Navigation and the Domain Name System.

Paul Barford is an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research interests include wide area networks and protocols, Internet measurement, network performance



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Appendix B Committee Member and Staff Biographies Craig Partridge,Chair, is a chief scientist at BBN Technologies (a Verizon company), where he leads a variety of Internet-related research efforts. His current major projects involve an innovative way to trace Internet packets to their origin and the use of signal processing techniques to perform traffic analysis. In the mid-1980s, Dr. Partridge designed the process by which Internet e-mail is routed. He is the chairman of the Association for Computing Machinery’s Special Interest Group in Data Communication (one of the two major professional societies in data communications). He is the former editor-in-chief of ACM’s Computer Communication Review and of the IEEE Network Magazine, and a consulting editor for Addison-Wesley’s Professional Computing series. A member of the technical advisory boards of Matrix.Net and Arbor Networks, Dr. Partridge is a former consulting professor at Stanford University and he spent 1990 as a visiting research fellow at the Swedish Institute of Computer Science. He is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and holds A.B., M.Sc., and Ph.D. degrees from Harvard University. Dr. Partridge was a member of the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) committee that authored The Internet’s Coming of Age, and he is also a member of CSTB’s Committee on Internet Navigation and the Domain Name System. Paul Barford is an assistant professor of computer science at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. His research interests include wide area networks and protocols, Internet measurement, network performance

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modeling and analysis, and the World Wide Web. Dr. Barford is on the Technical Advisory Board of epicRealm, Inc., and serves on the program committees of ACM SIGMETRICS 2003, the IEEE Workshop on Internet Applications 2003, the 2002 Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM) Workshop on Large Scale Communications Networks, and the 2002 International Performance and Dependability Symposium. Dr. Barford is the leader of the Badger Internet Group (BIG), which conducts research in network performance and network management. He received his Ph.D. in computer science from Boston University in December 2000. David D. Clark graduated from Swarthmore College in 1966 and received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1973. He has worked since then at the MIT Laboratory for Computer Science, where he is currently a senior research scientist in charge of the Advanced Network Architecture Group. Dr. Clark’s research interests include networks, network protocols, operating systems, distributed systems, and computer and communications security. After receiving his Ph.D., he worked on the early stages of the ARPANET and on the development of token-ring local-area-network technology. Since the mid-1970s, Dr. Clark has been involved in the development of the Internet. From 1981 to 1989, he acted as its chief protocol architect and chaired the Internet Activities Board. His current research area is protocols and architectures for very large and very high speed networks. Specific activities include extensions to the Internet to support real-time traffic, explicit allocation of service, pricing, and new network technologies. In the security area, Dr. Clark participated in the early development of the multilevel secure Multics operating system. He developed an information security model that stresses integrity of data rather than disclosure control. Dr. Clark is a fellow of the ACM and the IEEE and is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He received the ACM Special Interest Group in Data Communication (SIGCOMM) award and the IEEE award in International Communications, as well as the IEEE Hamming Award for his work on the Internet. He is a consultant to a number of companies and serves on several technical advisory boards. Dr. Clark chaired the committee that produced the CSTB report Computers at Risk: Safe Computing in the Information Age. He also served on the committees that produced the CSTB reports Toward a National Research Network; Realizing the Information Future: The Internet and Beyond; and The Unpredictable Certainty: Information Infrastructure Through 2000. He currently chairs the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies. Sean Donelan is director-Internet security at SBC Communications. He has extensive experience with peering, fiber-optic cable cuts, data center

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security, cracking, power outages, and other networking topics. Before joining SBC, Mr. Donelan was design engineer at Equinix, where he was responsible for the technical standards of Equinix Internet Business Exchange centers and identifying new technologies. Before joining Equinix, he was a principal technical staff member at AT&T Laboratories. There he worked on Internet service for Concert, the joint venture between AT&T and British Telecommunications. He also acted as the lead Internet service provider (ISP) representative to the U.S. Year 2000 Coordination Center for ISPs that were not represented by first-tier providers. Prior to joining AT&T, Mr. Donelan was at Data Research Associates (DRA) for 14 years. He served in a variety of positions, from database programmer to senior network architect. He was responsible for building a nationwide backbone network that provides Internet and database services to more than 3,000 libraries. At DRA, Mr. Donelan wrote the first commercial library catalog search engine on the World Wide Web. Vern Paxson received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a senior scientist at the International Computer Science Institute’s Center for Internet Research in Berkeley and a staff computer scientist at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and he serves on the technical advisory boards of a number of Internet-related companies. Dr. Paxson’s research focuses on Internet measurement and on detection and analysis of Internet attacks. His doctoral thesis, which pioneered the use of “measurement infrastructure” for conducting large-scale Internet measurement studies, was awarded the Sakrison Memorial Prize of the University of California, Berkeley, for outstanding dissertation research; this work was also cited as best student paper from ACM SIGCOMM for a paper derived from one of its chapters. Dr. Paxson’s study of Internet routing was awarded the IEEE Communications Society’s William R. Bennett Prize Paper Award, and he was again awarded the Bennett Prize for his paper (with S. Floyd) “Difficulties in Simulating the Internet” in IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. His work on the “Bro” intrusion detection system was awarded best paper at the USENIX Security Symposium, and subsequent research on detecting backdoors led to a USENIX Security Symposium best student paper award for his student coauthor (Y. Zhang). Dr. Paxson serves on the editorial board of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking. He has been active in the Internet Engineering Task Force (<www.ietf.org>), chairing working groups on performance metrics, Transport Control Protocol (TCP) implementation, and endpoint-congestion management, and he has served on the Internet Engineering Steering Group as an area director for transport. Dr. Paxson has coauthored 10 requests for comments (RFCs) specifying Internet Engineering Task Force standards and practices. As current chair

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of the Internet Research Task Force (<www.irtf.org>), he is an ex officio member of the Internet Architecture Board (<www.iab.org>). Dr. Paxson served as program committee co-chair for the 2002 ACM SIGCOMM conference, and he is program committee chair for the 2003 USENIX Security Symposium. He was a founding member (in 2001) of the Internet Measurement Workshop, and continues to serve on its steering committee. Paxson was a member of the committee that produced CSTB’s Looking Over the Fence at Networks: A Neighbor’s View of Networking Research. Jennifer Rexford is a member of the network management and performance department at AT&T Labs–Research in Florham Park, New Jersey. Her research focuses on routing protocols and traffic measurement, with the goal of developing new methods and tools for operating large Internet Protocol networks. Dr. Rexford serves on the steering committee for the Internet Measurement Workshop, the editorial board of IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking, and the advisory boards of ACM SIGCOMM, Arbor Networks, and MentorNet. She is a senior member of the IEEE and coauthor of the book Web Protocols and Practice: HTTP/1.1, Networking Protocols, Caching, and Traffic Measurement (Addison-Wesley, 2001) with Balachander Krishnamurthy. Dr. Rexford received her B.S.E. degree in electrical engineering from Princeton University in 1991, and her M.S.E. and Ph.D. degrees in computer science and electrical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1993 and 1996, respectively. Mary K. Vernon is a professor and Vilas Associate both in the computer sciences department and industrial engineering department at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Her research targets the development and state-of-the-art application of computer systems performance modeling techniques that can be used to design new near-optimal computer/ communication system architectures with known performance properties. Dr. Vernon has made contributions to commercial bus arbiters, cache coherence protocols, mesh interconnection networks with wormhole routing, the Sequent Symmetry bus design, commercial memory system design methods, analysis of parallel shared memory system architectures with complex modern processors, the Cray UNICOS operating system semaphore architecture, production parallel system job scheduling policies, the design of large parallel and distributed applications, scalable protocols for on-demand streaming with packet loss recovery, optimized media content delivery networks, media content delivery cost models, customized mean value analysis modeling techniques, LogP modeling techniques, task graph analysis techniques, interpolation approximation techniques, and Petri net modeling techniques. Her current research includes development of analytic modeling methods, networked systems

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security, scalable multimedia delivery protocols and content distribution networks, design of widely distributed adaptive applications, and job scheduling policies for the TeraGrid. Dr. Vernon received the National Science Foundation (NSF) Presidential Young Investigator Award in 1985, the NSF Faculty Award for Women in Science and Engineering in 1990, the ACM Fellow Award in 1995 for “fundamental contributions to performance analysis of parallel computer architectures and for leadership in the computing research community,” and a University of Wisconsin, Madison Vilas Associate Award in 2000. She is a co-inventor on two U.S. patents for bus arbitration protocols and on four recent U.S. patent applications for new streaming media delivery protocols. She has published more than 80 technical papers, including three that have won best-paper awards. She has served on the editorial boards of IEEE Transactions on Parallel and Distributed Systems and IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, the 1993 NSF Blue Ribbon Panel for High Performance Computing, the NSF Computer Information Science and Engineering Advisory Board, the board of directors of the Computing Research Association, external advisory committees for various engineering colleges and computer science departments, and as recent chair of the ACM SIGMETRICS. Staff Jon Eisenberg,Study Director, is a senior program officer with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board (CSTB) of the National Academies. At CSTB, he has been study director for a diverse body of work, including a series of studies exploring networking technologies and Internet and broadband policy. Current studies include an examination of emerging wireless technologies and spectrum policy and a review of the National Archives and Records Administration’s digital materials preservation strategy. In 1995-1997 he was a AAAS Science, Engineering, and Diplomacy Fellow at the U.S. Agency for International Development where he worked on environmental management, technology transfer, and telecommunications policy issues. He received his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Washington in 1996 and a B.S. in physics with honors from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst in 1988. As its Director, Marjory Blumenthal manages the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board of the National Academies—a 20-member Board of leaders from industry and academia—and its many expert project committees and staff. She designs, develops, directs, and oversees collaborative study projects, workshops, and symposia on technical, strategic, and policy issues in computing and telecommunications. These activities address trends in the relevant science and technology, their uses,

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and economic and social impacts, providing independent and authoritative analysis and/or a neutral meeting ground for senior people in government, industry, and academia. Marjory is the principal author and/or substantive editor of numerous reports and articles. The majority of her work has been interdisciplinary. Before joining CSTB, Marjory was manager, Competitive Analysis and Planning, for GE Information Services. There she directed an analytical team supporting business development, product marketing, and field sales and developed business alliances for domestic and international network services. Previously she was a project director at the former Office of Technology Assessment, evaluating computer and communications technology trends and their social and economic impacts. There, among other things, she produced an internationally acclaimed study of computers in manufacturing and their implications for industries and employment. Marjory is a member of the Santa Fe Institute Science Board, the Advisory Board of the Pew Internet & American Life Project, the TPRC Board of Directors, the editorial board of ACM Transactions on Internet Technology, and the ACM, AEA, and IEEE. In 1998 Marjory was a visiting scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Laboratory for Computer Science. At MIT she developed and taught a course on public policy for computer science graduate students and pursued personal research interests. Marjory did her undergraduate work at Brown University and her graduate work (as an NSF graduate fellow) at Harvard University. David Padgham, research associate, began with CSTB in 1998, working on, among other things, the studies that produced Trust in Cyberspace, Funding a Revolution, and Realizing the Potential of C4I. More recently, he has assisted with the research and production of Broadband: Bringing Home the Bits, LC21: A Digital Strategy for the Library of Congress, The Internet’s Coming of Age, Looking Over the Fence at Networks, and Information Technology Research, Innovation, and E-Government. Currently, he is providing research support for two CSTB projects: one focusing on privacy in the information age and one looking at digital archiving and the National Archives and Records Administration. He holds a master’s degree in library and information science (2001) from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., as well as a bachelor of arts degree (1996) in English from Warren Wilson College in Asheville, N.C. Kristen Batch is a research associate with the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. She will be involved with upcoming projects focusing on wireless communication technologies and telecommunications research and development. While pursuing an M.A. in International Communications from American University, she interned at the National

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Telecommunications and Information Administration, in the Office of International Affairs, and at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, in the Technology and Public Policy Program. She also earned a B.A. from Carnegie Mellon University in literary and cultural studies and in Spanish, and she received two travel grants to conduct independent research in Spain. D.C. Drake joined the staff of CSTB in September 1999. He is currently handling work on a number of projects, including one on critical information infrastructure protection and the law and another on a research agenda for counterterrorism. He came to Washington, D.C., in January 1999 after finishing a master’s in international politics and communications at the University of Kentucky and earning a B.A. in international relations and German from Rhodes College in 1996. He has worked for the Hanns-Seidl Foundation in Munich, Germany, and in Washington, D.C., for the National Conference of State Legislatures’ International Programs Office and for the Majority Staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Janet Briscoe is the administrative officer for the Computer Science and Telecommunications Board. She has been a part of the team since 1997. Janet has over 15 years of experience in administrative management. Her areas of expertise include process improvement, problem solving, problem resolution, troubleshooting, time management, and organizational effectiveness. Prior to joining CSTB, Janet worked as a support services manager for Norrell Corporation (1991-1996), where she was contracted to provide administrative management services to two of Norrell Corporation’s clients (Ernst & Young and IBM). She also worked as a word-processing manager for Shannon & Luchs (1986-1991). Janet is very active in her local church and community, where she serves in several leadership positions. She is also a volunteer for Junior Achievement of the Washington, D.C., area. Janet holds a B.S. degree in organizational management from Columbia Union College.