cussed. Chapter 5, “Air Force Micro- and Nanotechnology Programs and Opportunities,” briefly summarizes the current investments by the Air Force in micro-and nanotechnologies and considers the role of Air Force science and technology in this area relative to the commercial sector. Chapter 6, “Opportunities in Micro-and Nanotechnologies,” focuses on the systems implications of micro- and nanotechnologies and suggests areas for further consideration. Such mission considerations provide a methodology to focus on and prioritize investments for those technologies discussed in Chapters 3 and 4 that are most critical to the Air Force. Finally, Chapter 7, “Findings and Recommendations,” provides a summary of the findings and recommends ways in which the Air Force might focus its attention and resources in the areas of micro- and nanotechnology.

REFERENCES

1. Shermer, M. 2001. Nano nonsense and cryonics. Scientific American 285(3): 29.

2. Reid, T.R. 2001. The Chip: How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution. New York, N.Y.: Random House, Inc.

3. National Research Council. 2001. Physics in a New Era: An Overview. Washington, D.C.: National Academy Press.

4. Reid, T.R. 2001. The Chip: How Two Americans Invented the Microchip and Launched a Revolution. New York, N.Y.: Random House, Inc.



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