C Biographies of Committee Members and Key NRC Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

BARRY C.BARISH, Chair, Linde Professor of Physics and director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), California Institute of Technology, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society. He is a recipient of the Klopsteg award of the American Association of Physics Teachers. Dr. Barish received his doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley in 1962 and was a postdoctoral fellow there until moving to Caltech for good in 1963. An experimental high-energy and gravitational-wave physicist, he is leading the search for gravitational waves in LIGO and is involved in the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search project, which is a long-baseline neutrino physics experiment between Fermilab and the Soudan Mine in Minnesota, as well as other major nonaccelerator experiments in both the United States and Italy. He is a former member of the 1991 Astronomy Survey Panel on Particle Astrophysics, the Briefing Panel on Scientific Frontiers and the Superconducting Super Collider for the 1986 physics survey, and the 2001 Astronomy Survey Panel on Particle, Nuclear, and Gravitational-wave Astrophysics. Dr. Barish co-chaired the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Science Foundation (NSF) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel’s recent subpanel on long-range planning for the U.S. high-energy physics community. He is chair of the oversight committee for IceCube and a member of the agency review committee for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Dr. Barish recently served as chair of the



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C Biographies of Committee Members and Key NRC Staff COMMITTEE MEMBERS BARRY C.BARISH, Chair, Linde Professor of Physics and director of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), California Institute of Technology, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society. He is a recipient of the Klopsteg award of the American Association of Physics Teachers. Dr. Barish received his doctorate from the University of California at Berkeley in 1962 and was a postdoctoral fellow there until moving to Caltech for good in 1963. An experimental high-energy and gravitational-wave physicist, he is leading the search for gravitational waves in LIGO and is involved in the Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search project, which is a long-baseline neutrino physics experiment between Fermilab and the Soudan Mine in Minnesota, as well as other major nonaccelerator experiments in both the United States and Italy. He is a former member of the 1991 Astronomy Survey Panel on Particle Astrophysics, the Briefing Panel on Scientific Frontiers and the Superconducting Super Collider for the 1986 physics survey, and the 2001 Astronomy Survey Panel on Particle, Nuclear, and Gravitational-wave Astrophysics. Dr. Barish co-chaired the Department of Energy (DOE)/National Science Foundation (NSF) High Energy Physics Advisory Panel’s recent subpanel on long-range planning for the U.S. high-energy physics community. He is chair of the oversight committee for IceCube and a member of the agency review committee for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Dr. Barish recently served as chair of the

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International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) commission on particles and fields and is incoming chair of the U.S. Liaison Committee to IUPAP. He served as science coordinator of the DOE/NSF Scientific Assessment Group for Experiments in Non-Accelerator Physics (SAGENAP) review panel. DANIEL S.AKERIB, associate professor of physics, Case Western Reserve University, received his doctorate from Princeton University in 1991. After fellowships at Caltech and the Center for Particle Astrophysics, he joined the faculty of Case Western Reserve University in 1995. His current research interests are in experimental particle astrophysics, dark-matter searches, low-temperature detectors, and accelerator-based particle physics. He is a member of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search Collaboration (CDMS), located in the Soudan Mine in northern Minnesota. His group at Case Western is conducting experiments using a new generation of cryogenic detectors that have extremely good sensitivity to dark matter compared with conventional detectors, and it is also developing next-generation dark-matter particle detectors. He is deputy project manager for the CDMS II experiment and U.S. principle investigator on an ultralow-threshold detector grant from the Civilian Research and Development Fund for the Independent States of the Former Soviet Union. He was an NSF Faculty Early Career Development Program awardee in 1997. STEVEN R.ELLIOTT, scientific staff member, Los Alamos National Laboratory, received his doctorate from the University of California at Irvine in 1987 and then did postdoctoral work at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory before joining the University of Washington as a research assistant professor in 1995. He returned to the Los Alamos National Laboratory in July 2002. His research expertise is in atomic, nuclear, and particle physics, and he is one of the world’s experts in double beta decay physics. He is a member of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory collaboration, the Russian-American gallium solar neutrino experiment, and the Majorana project to detect neutrinoless double beta decay. Dr. Elliott has been a member of several professional conference committees, a DOE review committee for the international Kamioka Liquid Scintillator Antineutrino Detector (KamLAND) neutrino experiment in Japan, and the program committee of the American Physical Society’s (APS) Division of Nuclear Physics. PATRICK D.GALLAGHER, physicist, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). received his Ph.D. in physics at the University of Pittsburgh in 1991. Dr. Gallagher is currently leader of the Research Facilities Operations Group and Beam Experiment coordinator at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. Dr. Gallagher’s group at NIST designed, installed, and operates the liquid hydrogen cold neutron source, the neutron guide network, and the instruments in the Cold Neutron Research Facility and reactor and coordinates experimental facilities. Dr.

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Gallagher’s research interests include neutron and x-ray diffraction of nanoscale structures, especially in soft condensed matter systems such as liquids, polymers, and gels, as well as the experimental study of nonequilibrium structure and processes in complex condensed matter systems. Dr. Gallagher is a member of the American Physical Society (Polymer Physics) and the Materials Research Society (MRS). In 2000 Dr. Gallagher was a NIST agency representative at the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) and Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), where he had responsibility for major science facilities (especially the Spallation Neutron Project and the National Ignition Facility), science funding, the government-university research partnership, radioactive waste management, radiation protection regulations, science and security at DOE national labs, and laboratory reform. He is the chair of the OSTP’s Neutron Sciences Interagency Working Group; a past member of the Proposal Evaluation Committee for the Los Alamos Spectrometer Development Project and of the DOE’s Review Committee on the Technical, Cost, Management Review of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Short Pulse Spallation Source (LANSCE SPSS) Enhancement Project; and a former member of the Targets and Instruments Advisory Committee for the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge. He is currently a member of the National Research Council’s Solid State Sciences Committee. ROBERT E.LANOU, JR., professor of physics, Brown University, is an elementary particle physicist specializing in experimental studies at high-energy accelerators and in the development of new detector technology for low-energy neutrino detectors. Dr. Lanou received his doctorate from Yale University. A member of the Brown faculty since 1959 and chair of the physics department from 1986 to 1992, Dr. Lanou is a fellow of the American Physical Society (APS) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). He was previously on the staff of the University of California at Berkeley, and was a visiting fellow in the Italian National Universities at Padua and Bari and at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Osaka University, Japan, and the Center for Particle Astrophysics at Berkeley. He has served on the High Energy Physics Program Advisory Committee of several national laboratories, as well as on the Executive Committee of the American Physical Society’s Division of Particles and Fields. Dr. Lanou was a member of the NRC’s Panel on Neutrino Astrophysics. He was science coordinator for the DOE/NSF Scientific Assessment Group for Non-Accelerator Physics when that group reviewed, and approved for further development, the IceCube project, and he was a member of an NSF peer-review panel for the Homestake National Underground Science Lab proposal. PETER MÉSZÁROS, Distinguished Professor of Physics and Astronomy and Astrophysics and head of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, received his doctorate from the University of California

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at Berkeley in 1972. The author of 130 refereed journal articles, he has research interests in theoretical astrophysics and specifically in high-energy astrophysics, gamma-ray bursts, cosmology, and neutron stars. His recent work has centered on the formulation and development of the cosmological fireball shock scenario of gamma-ray bursts, and he serves as the science/theory lead of the SWIFT consortium, a multi-institution National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) satellite to study gamma-ray-burst afterglows, that is currently under construction and scheduled for launch in 2003. He also has interests in the production of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos and photons from gamma-ray bursts, in preparation for experiments such as NASA’s Gamma-ray Large Area Survey Telescope (GLAST) and the IceCube/AMANDA projects. He is involved with the NSF Physics Frontier Center for Gravitational Wave Physics and the Center for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, both at Penn State. Dr. Meszaros was a joint recipient of the Rossi Prize from the High Energy Astrophysics Division of the American Astronomical Society in 2000, and he was a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellow in 1999–2000. He is a fellow of the American Physical Society, and he was a National Academy of Sciences International Research and Exchange Fellow in 1986. In additional to numerous ad hoc review panels at NASA and the NSF, he is a member of the gamma-ray burst panel for NASA’s Constellation-X Facility Science Team and a board member of the Hobby-Eberly Spectroscopic Survey Telescope. HITOSHI MURAYAMA, a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, received his doctorate from the University of Tokyo in 1991. After postdoctoral work at Tohoku University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, he joined the physics department at the University of California at Berkeley in 1995 and was promoted to full professor by 2000. His research interests are in theoretical particle physics, specifically supersymmetry phenomenology, particle cosmology, electron-positron linear collider physics, supersymmetric field theories, and neutrino physics. He received the 2002 Yukawa Memorial Prize in Theoretical Physics for his work. Dr. Murayama was a member of the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel’s recent subpanel on long-range planning for the U.S. high-energy physics community and served on the organizing committee for that community’s Snowmass summer study in 2001. He is a member of the KamLAND collaboration, a new neutrino experiment in Japan. He was a Sloan Foundation fellow from 1996 to 1999 and is a member of the Particle Data Group, an international collaboration that reviews particle physics and related areas of astrophysics and compiles/analyzes data on particle properties. ANGELA V.OLINTO, associate professor of astronomy and astrophysics at the Enrico Fermi Institute of the University of Chicago, received her doctorate from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1987 before moving to

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postdoctoral and research positions at Fermilab and the University of Chicago, where she joined the faculty in 1996. Her research interests are in theoretical astrophysics, nuclear and particle astrophysics, and cosmology. She is the team leader for the High-Energy Particles from Space group at the new NSF Center for Cosmological Physics located at the University of Chicago. Dr. Olinto was an organizer of the 2002 Aspen Winter Workshop on ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and high-energy neutrinos. She is a collaboration member of the Pierre Auger Observatory project in Argentina and a fellow of the American Physical Society, is a member and corporate secretary of the Aspen Center for Physics, and was a member of the DOE’s Nuclear Science Advisory Committee. RENE A.ONG, professor of physics and astronomy, University of California at Los Angeles, received his doctorate from Stanford University in 1987. He was a Robert McCormick Fellow of the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago and then an assistant professor and associate professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Chicago. He moved to the University of California at Los Angeles in 2001. His research interests are in particle astrophysics, with recent work focused on the astrophysics of the high-energy universe, as revealed by gamma rays, neutrinos, and cosmic rays. Prof. Ong is U.S. principle investigator for the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cerenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) ground-based gamma-ray telescope located in New Mexico and is a member of the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) collaboration building an array of gamma-ray telescopes in Arizona. He is an associate member of the Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Dr. Ong served on the 2001 Astronomy Decadal Survey’s Panel on Particle, Nuclear, and Gravitationalwave Astrophysics and the Panel on High Energy Astrophysics from Space. He was a member of the recent subpanel on long-range planning for the DOE/NSF High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) and the High-Energy and Nuclear Physics Advisory Panel of the Particle and Nuclear Astrophysics and Gravitation International Committee (PANAGIC). He is currently a member of HEPAP and the Scientific Assessment Group for Experiments in Non-Accelerator Physics (SAGENAP). R.G.HAMISH ROBERTSON, professor of physics and scientific director of the Center for Experimental Nuclear Physics and Astrophysics, University of Washington, is U.S. co-principal investigator on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). His specialty is neutrino physics, including neutrino mass and solar neutrinos, and his past research interests have spanned weak interactions, atomic beam magnetic resonance, nuclear astrophysics, isobaric multiplets, and nuclei far from stability. In addition to SNO, he is a collaborator on the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN), Majorana, and Molybdenum Observatory of Neutrinos (MOON) experiments that probe neutrino mass, double beta decay, and solar

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neutrinos. He received his Ph.D. in nuclear physics in 1971 from McMaster University. Before joining the Physics Department at the University of Washington, Dr. Robertson was a fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Before that, he was a professor of physics at Michigan State University, a research associate at Princeton University, an Alfred P.Sloan Fellow, and a visiting scientist at the Chalk River Nuclear Labs and Argonne National Laboratory. He is a fellow of the British Institute of Physics, a member of the Canadian Association of Physicists, and a fellow of the American Physical Society. In 1997 he received the APS Tom W.Bonner Prize. He has chaired the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee and the Division of Nuclear Physics (DNP) of the APS. A past member of the Board on Physics and Astronomy of the National Research Council, he has also served on previous NRC nuclear physics and neutrino astrophysics panels, the APS-DNP Executive Committee and Program Committee, the APS Bonner Prize Committee, the National Science and Engineering Research Council (Canada) Grant Selection Committee, review committees for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Nuclear Science Division and Caltech’s Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy Division, the editorial boards of Physical Review D and Annual Reviews of Nuclear and Particle Physics, the Scientific Assessment Group for Experiments in Non-Accelerator Physics, and review panels for the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy. NICHOLAS P.SAMIOS, Distinguished Senior Scientist and director emeritus, Brookhaven National Laboratory, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Physical Society. An experimental high-energy physicist, he spent 15 years as the director of Brookhaven. Dr. Samios led the experiment at Brookhaven that discovered the charmed baryon in 1975, and as director he led the effort to construct the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider—the world’s newest facility for nuclear physics research. He has won DOE’s E.O.Lawrence Memorial Award and the New York Academy of Science Award in Physical and Mathematical Sciences, and he received the W.K.H.Panofsky Prize from the American Physical Society in 1993 in recognition of his participation in the omega-minus particle discovery. He was the 2001 recipient of the prestigious international Bruno Pontecorvo Prize by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Russia for his contributions both as a researcher in elementary particle physics, particularly neutrino physics, and as a scientific administrator. He is a former member of the NRC’s Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Applications and of the NRC’s Supercollider Site Evaluation Committee. JOHN P.SCHIFFER, senior physicist, Argonne National Laboratory, and professor of physics emeritus, University of Chicago, is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society, the American

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Association for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and he is a foreign member of the Royal Danish Academy of Sciences. He has expertise in a broad range of experimental nuclear physics and related fields. He has served on a number of advisory and review committees and was chair of the Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) from 1983 to 1985, during which time the 1983 Long Range Plan for the field was prepared and the first committee to look at new solar neutrino experiments was formed. He has been chair of the Division of Nuclear Physics of the American Physical Society, served on its Executive Committee, was its divisional councilor, and has been chair of the Physics Section of the AAAS. He is a recipient of the American Physical Society’s Tom W.Bonner Prize for his work in nuclear structure and of Yale’s Wilbur Lucius Cross Medal. Dr. Schiffer served on numerous NRC committees and was chair of the Committee on Nuclear Physics while it undertook the decadal study, published in 1999, Nuclear Physics—the Core of Matter, the Fuel of Stars. FRANK J.SCIULLI is the Pupin Professor of Physics at Columbia University. His research interests include weak interactions of elementary particles, particularly K-meson decays and neutrino interactions. He received his Ph.D. in experimental high-energy particle physics in 1965 from the University of Pennsylvania. Before going to Columbia University, he was a research associate in particle physics at the University of Pennsylvania and a research fellow and professor in particle physics at the California Institute of Technology. He led a series of experiments at Fermilab on neutrino interactions between 1970 and 1990. Dr. Sciulli’s research is now primarily concerned with the scattering of high-energy electrons and protons at the Deutsche Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) Laboratory in Germany. The experimental program uses the Hadron Electron Ring Accelerator (HERA) colliding beam accelerator and the ZEUS detector. Dr. Sciulli is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and Sigma Xi and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. He was also a member of the recent NRC Committee on the Physics of the Universe. He chaired the DOE High Energy Physics Advisory Panel’s Subpanel on Accelerator-based Neutrino Oscillation Experiments in 1995 that recommended the MINOS long-baseline experiment between Fermilab and the Soudan Mine. MICHAEL S.TURNER is the Bruce V. and Diana M.Rauner Distinguished Service Professor and chair of the Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics at the University of Chicago. He also holds appointments in the Department of Physics and Enrico Fermi Institute at Chicago and is a member of the scientific staff at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. Prof. Turner is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research interests are in theoretical astrophysics, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. Prof. Turner

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is a leader in the application of particle and nuclear physics to astrophysics and cosmology and has made important contributions to the theory of big-bang nucleosynthesis, big-bang baryogenesis, the inflationary universe, and the nature of dark matter and its role in the formation of structure in the universe. He has been a Sloan Foundation Fellow and is a recipient of the Helen B.Warner Prize from the American Astronomical Society, the Julius Edgar Lilienfeld Prize from the American Physical Society, the Quantrell Award for excellence in undergraduate teaching at the University of Chicago, and the Halley Lectureship at Oxford University. Prof. Turner was chair of the NRC’s Committee on the Physics of the Universe. He has also been a member of other NRC committees, including the 2001 Astronomy and Astrophysics Survey Committee. NRC STAFF DONALD C.SHAPERO received a B.S degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1964 and a Ph.D. from MIT in 1970. His thesis addressed the asymptotic behavior of relativistic quantum field theories. After receiving the Ph.D., he became a Thomas J.Watson Postdoctoral Fellow at IBM. He subsequently became an assistant professor at American University, later moving to Catholic University and then joining the staff of the National Research Council in 1975. He took a leave of absence from the NRC in 1978 to serve as the first executive director of the Energy Research Advisory Board at the Department of Energy. He returned to the NRC in 1979 to serve as special assistant to the president of the National Academy of Sciences. In 1982, he started the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy (BPA). As BPA director, he has played a key role in many NRC studies, including the two most recent surveys of physics and the two most recent surveys of astronomy and astrophysics. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Astronomical Society, and the International Astronomical Union. He has published research articles in refereed journals in high-energy physics, condensed-matter physics, and environmental science. TIMOTHY I.MEYER is a program associate at the NRC’s Board on Physics and Astronomy. Dr. Meyer joined the NRC staff in 2002 after earning his Ph.D. in experimental particle physics from Stanford University. His thesis concerned the time evolution of the B meson in the BaBar experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. His work also focused on radiation monitoring and protection of silicon-based particle detectors. During his time at Stanford, Dr. Meyer received both the Paul Kirkpatrick and Centennial Teaching awards for his work as an instructor of undergraduates. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Phi Beta Kappa, and the Union of Concerned Scientists.