Appendixes



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Review of Doe’s Vision 21 Research and Development Program—Phase I Appendixes

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Review of Doe’s Vision 21 Research and Development Program—Phase I This page in the original is blank.

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Review of Doe’s Vision 21 Research and Development Program—Phase I A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members James J. Markowsky (NAE), chair, is retired executive vice president of American Electric Power (AEP) Service Corporation, where he led the Power Generation Group and was responsible for fossil-fueled and hydroelectric generating facilities, affiliate coal mining, coal procurement and transportation, and environmental services. He is a member of the NRC’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems and previously served as a member of its Energy Engineering Board and as chairman of the Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes. He received a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from Pratt Institute, master’s degrees from Cornell University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. (mechanical engineering) from Cornell University. David H. Archer (NAE) is an adjunct professor at Carnegie Mellon University. He is a consulting engineer, having retired from the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, and has extensive expertise in the design and evaluation of innovative fossil-fueled power generation systems. His work has included basic studies of flame behavior as well as applications of combustion turbines, high-temperature fuel cells, gasifiers, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleaning. He served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes. He joined Westinghouse in 1960. Dr. Archer holds a B.S. in chemical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and a Ph.D. in chemical engineering and mathematics from the University of Delaware.

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Review of Doe’s Vision 21 Research and Development Program—Phase I Ramon L. Espino is currently research professor at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; he has been on the faculty since 1999. Prior to joining the Department of Chemical Engineering, he was with ExxonMobil for 26 years. He held a number of research management positions in petroleum exploration and production, petroleum processes and products, alternative fuels, and petrochemicals. He has published about 20 technical articles and holds nine patents. Dr. Espino’s research interests focus on fuel cell technology, specifically in the development of processors that convert clean fuels into hydrogen and of fuel cell anodes that are resistant to carbon monoxide poisoning. Another area of interest is the conversion of methane to clean liquid fuels, specifically the development of catalysts for the selective partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas. He served on the NRC Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes. Dr. Espino received a B.S. degree in chemical engineering from Louisiana State University and an M.S. and a Doctor of Science in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Enrique Iglesia is director, Berkeley Catalysis Center, and professor of chemical engineering at the University of California at Berkeley (and faculty scientist at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). He joined the University in 1993, after 11 years of industrial experience in heterogeneous catalysis and reaction engineering at Exxon Research and Engineering, which he left as head of catalysis research. He served on the NRC Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes. He received a B.S. (chemical engineering) from Princeton University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees (chemical engineering) from Stanford University. Edward S. Rubin is the Alumni Professor of Environmental Engineering and Science at Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). He holds joint appointments in the Departments of Engineering and Public Policy and Mechanical Engineering and is director of CMU’s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies. His teaching and research interests at CMU are in environmental control, energy utilization, and technology-policy interactions, with a particular focus on coal-based systems. He is the author of over 200 technical papers and reports, as well as a new textbook on engineering and the environment. He has served as a member of technical and advisory committees to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the National Research Council and is a member of several technical and professional societies. He served on the NRC Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes and is a member of the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He also serves as a consultant to public and private organizations with interests in energy utilization and environmental protection. He earned a B.E.in mechanical engineering at the City College of New York and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from Stanford University.

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Review of Doe’s Vision 21 Research and Development Program—Phase I Robert H. Socolow is a former director of the Center on Energy and Environmental Studies and is currently a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Princeton University, where he has been on the faculty since 1971. He was previously a National Science Foundation fellow, and an assistant professor of physics at Yale University. Dr. Socolow is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. His areas of research include energy utilization, the environmental effects of energy technologies, and carbon management for fossil fuels. He has served on many NRC boards and committees, including the Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes and the Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. He has B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in physics from Harvard University. Samuel S. Tam is vice president of Advanced Energy Technology, Energy Delivery and Management Division, Nexant, Inc., a Bechtel affiliated company. He is responsible for project execution and business development activities in the clean fossil energy practice. Prior to joining Nexant, he was the manager for advanced petroleum and chemical technology, Bechtel Technology and Consulting, and was responsible for monitoring and developing emerging technologies in the refining and chemical industries, including conversion of natural gas to liquid transportation fuels and technologies related to greenhouse gases and global climate warming. Before joining Bechtel in 1988, Mr. Tam was a project leader at BP America, working on commercial and technology development of methanol and other alcohols as transportation fuels. He holds B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from Ohio State University. Stephen Wittrig is director of the Clean Energy: Facing the Future Program for BP. This is a program to invest $10 million in Chinese universities to develop and prove clean energy technologies for China and the rest of the world. Previously, he worked on the BP/Amoco merger, considering gas-to-liquids strategy and chemical technology strategy and implementation; and on special assignments for Amoco, including leading the strategy development team for gas to liquids and oxygenates. In prior assignments with Amoco, he managed the engineering and process evaluation group for new product development in chemicals; led a team developing new reactor technology for methane conversion to syngas, and worked with Amoco Oil on coal liquefaction, refinery research, and pollution control. He has a B.S. (University of Illinois, Urbana) and a Ph.D. (California Institute of Technology) in chemical engineering. Ronald H. Wolk is principal, Wolk Integrated Technical Services. His previous positions include director of the Advanced Fossil Power Systems Department at EPRI and associate laboratory director at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc. He has extensive experience in assessing, developing, and commercializing advanced

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Review of Doe’s Vision 21 Research and Development Program—Phase I power generation and fuel conversion technologies, including fuel cell, gas turbine, distributed power generation, and integrated gasification combined cycle technology systems. He served on the NRC Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes. He has B.S. and M.S. degrees in chemical engineering from the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn (now Polytechnic University). John M. Wootten is vice president, Environment and Technology, Peabody Energy. He spent most of his professional career with Peabody Holding Company, Inc., the largest producer and marketer of coal in the United States. His positions at Peabody and its subsidiaries have included that of director of environmental services, director of research and technology, vice president for engineering and operations services, and president of Coal Services Corporation (COALSERV). His areas of expertise include the environmental and combustion aspects of coal utilization, clean coal technologies, and environmental control technologies for coal combustion. He has served on a number of NRC committees, including the Committee on R&D Opportunities for Advanced Fossil-Fueled Energy Complexes. He received a B.S. (mechanical engineering) from the University of Missouri–Columbia and an M.S. (civil engineering, environmental, and sanitary engineering curriculum) from the University of Missouri–Rolla.