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Biographical Sketches Eugene Smolensky (Chair) is an economist and current professor of public policy at the University of California, Berkeley. Smolensky studies wel- fare policy and the impact of political, economic and demographic changes on the distribution of income among various social groups. He is a member of the National Academy of Public Administration and the Na- tional Academy of Social Insurance, and serves on the Board of Trustees of the Russell Sage Foundation. He is past editor of the Journal of Human Resources and has served as chair of the Department of Econom- ics and director of the Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He served as dean of the Graduate School of Public Policy at Berkeley, from 1988 to 1997. He has been a member of three NAS committees, including the Committee on Child Development Research and Public Policy. His research interests and areas of expertise include public policy, income distribution, poverty policy, public finance, and welfare reform. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Pennsylvania. Suzanne Bianchi is professor of sociology and currently directs the Mary- land Population Research Center at the University of Maryland. She was formerly Assistant Chief for Social and Demographic Statistics in the Popu- lation Division of the U.S. Census Bureau. She served as president of the Population Association of America in 2000. She currently serves on the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's (NICHD) Population Research Subcommittee. She is a past chair of both the Family 327

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328 WORKING FAMILIES AND GROWING KIDS and the Population Sections, and currently a council member of the Chil- dren and Youth Section, of the American Sociological Association. Bianchi is a family demographer with research interests in maternal employment, children and parents' time use, and child poverty and inequality. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Michigan. David Blau is professor of economics and fellow of the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is a labor and population economist with research interests in aging and child care. His aging research focuses on the dynamics of employment behavior of individuals and couples at older ages. His recent research examines links between saving and retirement decisions. He is the director of the Demog- raphy and Economics of Aging research program at the Carolina Popula- tion Center at UNC. His child care research has examined the impact of the cost of child care on women's labor force participation, mode of care, and fertility. More recently he has analyzed the determinants and consequences of the quality of child care, and the impact of child care subsidies on employment and welfare participation. His book, The Child Care Prob- lem: An Economic Analysis, was recently published by the Russell Sage Foundation. He is a past co-editor of the Journal of Human Resources, a past deputy editor of Demography, and a past member of the NIH Social Sciences and Population Study Section. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin at Madison. Amy Gawad (Research Associate) is a staff member with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council/Institutes of Medicine. As well as working on this project, she oversees the Academy's W.T. Grant Youth Development Prize Committee. She recently served as research associate on the National Academy of Sciences report Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Prior to her work on youth development at NAS, she had responsibility at the board for the dissemina- tion of From Neurons to Neighborhoods, a report on the science of early childhood development, and for supporting members of the Forum on Adolescence. She has an M.P.H. from the George Washington University School of Public Health. Jennifer Appleton Gootman (Study Director) is a staff member with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council/ Institutes of Medicine. Most recently she served as study director and co- editor of a National Academy of Sciences report Community Programs to Promote Youth Development. Prior to her work at NAS, she served as a social science analyst for the Office of Planning and Evaluation in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Her work has focused on child

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 329 and family policy for low-income families, including welfare reform, child care, child health, youth development, and teen pregnancy prevention is- sues. She has directed a number of community youth programs in Los Angeles and New York City, involving young people in leadership develop- ment, job preparedness, and community service. She has an M.A. in public policy from the New School for Social Research. Francine Jacobs is an associate professor with a joint appointment in the Departments of Child Development and Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning (UEP) at Tufts University, and is currently the chairperson of UEP. She has been a program evaluation consultant to numerous commu- nity-based child and family programs, and is currently co-directing a state- wide home visiting program evaluation. She is an editorial board member for the journal Applied Developmental Science. She was the former direc- tor of the National Child Welfare Research Center, Center for the Study of Social Policy in Washington, D.C. Her research interests include child and family policy, including child welfare and child care policy, family develop- ment, family preservation and support programs, program evaluation, and public policy analysis. She has an Ed.D. from Harvard University. Robin L. Jarrett is associate professor of family studies in the Department of Human and Community Development, University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign. She has been a member of key groups that focus on neighbor- hood processes and family and child-youth development including the So- cial Science Research Council's Working Group on Communities and Neighborhoods, Family Processes and Individual Development; the MacArthur Foundation Task Force on Successful Pathways through Middle Childhood; The National Council on Family Relations Study Group on Financial Decision Making Processes; and the Family Research Consortium III. Jarrett also serves on several editorial boards including the Journal of Research on Adolescence and the Encyclopedia of Community. She uses ethnographic field methods (participant observation, intensive interview- ing) to examine family coping strategies among inner-city families with children and adolescents. A particular focus is how demographic, social, and ecological aspects of neighborhoods influence specific parenting prac- tices and child-youth developmental processes and trajectories. She has conducted research that examined how welfare reform affected family cop- ing strategies among diverse ethnic families living in inner-city neighbor- hoods. Currently, she is collaborating on a project that examines how extracurricular and community-based youth activities promote adolescent development. Recent publications reflect her interests in families and neigh- borhoods. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

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330 WORKING FAMILIES AND GROWING KIDS Donna Klein is vice president of diversity and workplace effectiveness at Marriott International, Inc. In 1999 she assumed responsibility for Marriott's worldwide diversity strategy that included an increased focus on the develop- ment and retention of minority and women talent. She is co-chair of The Conference Board's Work Life Leadership Council, a member of The Confer- ence Board's Diversity Council, Boston College's Solutions, and The Urban Institute. She is also a founder and current co-chair of The Employer Group, a partnership of employers engaged in identifying quality of life solutions for hourly workers. She has been the catalyst for many employer-based collabo- rative projects addressing the complex needs of low-income workers. She has a B.A. in psychology from the University of Akron. Sanders Korenman is a professor of public affairs at the City University of New York at Baruch College and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. Since 1998, he has been a member of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families. In 1997-1998, he served as senior economist for labor, welfare, and education for President Clinton's Council of Economic Advisers. His expertise is in labor economics and demogra- phy. He has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University. Joan Lombardi is a child and family policy specialist, serving as an advisor to a number of national organizations and foundation across the county on early care and education issues. She served as the deputy assistant secretary for external affairs in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Prior to this appointment, she served as the first associate commissioner of the Child Care Bureau and as the staff director of the Secretary's Advisory Committee on Head Start Quality and Expansion. Her recent book, Time to Care: Redesigning Child Care to Promote Education, Support Families and Build Communities, was published by Temple University Press. She has a Ph.D. in human develop- ment education from the Institute for Child Study at the University of Maryland. Meredith Madden (senior project assistant, until June 2002) was a staff member with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council/Institutes of Medicine. As well as working on this project, she worked on activities related to motivation and engagement in second- ary schools. Before joining the board she worked at the Home for Little Wanderers. She has an M.A. in public policy from the George Washington University. Joseph L. Mahoney is assistant professor in the department of psychology at Yale University. His research interests focus on social adjustment during

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 331 the school years, and he has written extensively on adolescent participation in after-school activities. At Yale, he directs the Social Policy and Intervention Laboratory and the Yale Study of Children's After-School Time. He is a faculty member of the Yale Bush Center for Social Policy and Child Develop- ment, a member of the National Board of Directors for the Horizons National summer enrichment program, and is affiliated with the Yale Child Study Cen- ter. He has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from the Center for Develop- mental Science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Harriet Presser is distinguished university professor in the department of sociology at the University of Maryland at College Park. She was the founding director of the University's Center on Population, Gender, and Social Inequality from 1988-2001. Recently elected a fellow of the Ameri- can Association for the Advancement of Science, she is past president of the Population Association of American and has been a council member-at- large of the American Sociological Association. She has held residential fellowships at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities and Social Science, the Russell Sage Foundation, and the Rockefeller Foundation's Bellagio Study and Conference Center. She has been a member of two NAS Committees: the Panel on Child Care Policy and the Committee on Youth Employment Programs. Her research expertise is in the area of social demography, focusing on the intersections of gender, work, and family, and she has a book forthcoming on the movement toward a 24-hour economy and its impact on families. Additionally, she studies population and family policy issues from a national and international perspective. She has a Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley. Gary Sandefur is a professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. He began his career at the University of Oklahoma and has been on the faculty at the University of Wisconsin since 1984. Sandefur's work focuses on issues at the intersection of social demography and public policy, including work on families and racial and ethnic inequality. He is the co- author with Sara McLanahan of Growing Up with a Single Parent: What Hurts? What Helps?, published by Harvard University Press in 1994, and co-editor with Barney Cohen and Ronald Rindfuss of Changing Numbers, Changing Needs: American Indian Demography and Public Health, pub- lished by the National Academy Press in 1996. He is currently a funded PI in the National Institute for Child Health and Human Development's Fam- ily and Child Well-Being Research Network. He is also working on a project funded by Russell Sage to examine trends in family inequality over time and the implications of this for child well-being. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Stanford University.

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332 WORKING FAMILIES AND GROWING KIDS Elizabeth Townsend (senior project assistant, from June 2002) is a staff member with the Board on Children, Youth, and Families of the National Research Council/Institutes of Medicine. As well as working on this project, she is working on a report related to motivation and engagement among high school students. Before joining the National Academies, she worked as an instructor for public schools in Orange County, California, and Fairfax, Virginia. She has a B.S. in leisure studies management from the Radford University. Deborah Vandell is a professor in the department of educational psychol- ogy at the University of Wisconsin at Madison. She holds joint appoint- ments in the Department of Psychology and the School of Human Ecology. She is a member of the Maternal and Child Health review panel at the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD). She has served as an Associate Editor for Child Development and on the editorial boards for Contemporary Psychology, Developmental Psychol- ogy, and the Journal of Family Issues. She is a principal investigator with the NICHD Study of Child Care and Youth Development, a multi-site collaborative study of the effects of child care, schools, and families on children's developmental outcomes through middle childhood. Her re- search interests include examining relations among children's peer, sibling, and parent relationships over time. She has a Ph.D. from Boston Univer- sity. Jane Waldfogel is professor of social work and public affairs at Columbia University School of Social Work. She is also a research associate at the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion at the London School of Economics. She has written extensively on the impact of public policies on child and family well-being. She is the author of The Future of Child Protection: How to Break the Cycle of Abuse and Neglect (Harvard University Press, 1998) and co-editor (with Sheldon Danziger) of Securing the Future: Invest- ing in Children from Birth to Adulthood (Russell Sage Foundation, 2000). Her current research includes studies of family leave and parental care for children, child care policies, inequality in early childhood care and educa- tion, and child abuse and neglect. She has a Ph.D. in public policy from Harvard University. Hirokazu Yoshikawa is assistant professor of psychology at New York University, in community psychology. He has conducted research on ef- fects of early childhood care and education programs, public policies, and prevention programs on the development of children and adolescents in poverty in the United States. He is presently conducting research on effects of experimental welfare reform and anti-poverty policy demonstrations on

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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES 333 children and families, as an investigator in the Next Generation, a consor- tium of researchers from the Manpower Demonstration Research Corpora- tion (MDRC) and research universities. He is also carrying out research on the prevention of HIV infection among Asian/Pacific Islander immigrant communities in the United States. In 1999 he served on the U.S. Depart- ment of Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Head Start Research and Evaluation, a panel appointed to help design the national impact evaluation of Head Start. In 2001 he was awarded the Louise Kidder Early Career Award of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues, the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Early Career Award, and the William T. Grant Foundation Faculty Schol- ars Award. He has a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from New York Univer- sity. Martha Zaslow is a senior scholar at Child Trends in Washington, D.C. Her work focuses on the implications of welfare policies for families and children, the development of children in poverty, maternal employment, child care, and improving survey measures of parenting and of children's development. Her research interests and areas of expertise include implica- tions of welfare policies for families and children, development of children in poverty, maternal employment, child care, and survey measures. She has a Ph.D. in developmental psychology from Harvard University.

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