Appendixes



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 113
Appendixes

OCR for page 113
This page in the original is blank.

OCR for page 113
Appendix A Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff Eric Anderson, Chair, is the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and city manager of Des Moines, Iowa. As the CEO for the city, he has been active in using GIS capabilities to integrate and coordinate all municipal functions. As city manager, he has developed an enterprise in GIS platform to integrate citizen input and other city data in a geo-linked system. Mr. Anderson received an M.A. from the Maxwell School at Syracuse University and a Master of Public Administration degree from the Graduate School of Public Affairs, University of New York at Albany. He is a fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) and serves as assistant director for research and development of the International City and County Managers Association. Mr. Anderson was a member of the 1998 NAPA study on Geographic Information for the 21st Century and has been active in coordination activities for the national spatial data infrastructure. In addition, he is an active member of the NRC’s Mapping Science Committee. Nina S.-N. Lam is Richard J. Russell Louisiana Studies Professor in Geography, Department of Geography and Anthropology, Louisiana State University. Her research interests include cartography, GIS, remote sensing, quantitative methods, medical geography, and China. She has served on the NRC’s Mapping Science Committee. She is currently involved in studies that use census, environmental data, and public health information to examine spatial relationships between disease clustering and environmental factors. She has compiled indexes of regional economic development characteristics and used demographic data to determine voting patterns.

OCR for page 113
Kathe A. Newman is a Lecturer at Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, Center for Urban Policy Research, Rutgers University. Dr. Newman’s research interests include urban politics, qualitative research methods, and community development and the intersection of race, ethnicity, gender, and class. She has been working with neighborhood-level data and indicators and has used microlevel datasets to empower neighborhoods. She is a proponent for democratization of data in action. Tim Nyerges is a Professor in the Department of Geography at the University of Washington in Seattle. His research includes GIS, spatial decision support systems and group decision making, transportation and environmental analysis using GIS, human-computer interaction, and spatial cognition. He earned his Ph.D. in GIS from Ohio State University. Dr. Nyerges has developed a framework for gathering information for improved decision making based on diverse data-gathering strategies to result in more creative uses of GIS. He has experience in building GIS software and in the policy implications of applying GIS. Nancy J. Obermeyer is Associate Professor of Geography at Indiana State University. Her research interests have emphasized the institutional and societal ramifications of implementing GIS. Specifically, her focus has addressed two separate conceptual issues: how the proliferation of GIS databases and differential access to spatial databases influences the abilities of different social groups to use information for their own empowerment; and the possibilities and limitations of using GIS as a participatory conflict resolution tool. She has also been involved with the development of certification for GIS professionals, and is co-author (with Jeffrey Pinto) of Managing GIS (Guilford 1994, 2004). In an earlier career in public service, Dr. Obermeyer held professional assignments with the State of Illinois in the areas of planning, transportation, and energy. Myron Orfield is Executive Director of the Metropolitan Area Research Corporation, Minneapolis, Minnesota. His specific areas of interest include urban sprawl, regional governance, transit, taxes, and environment. He is the president and founder of the Metropolitan Area Research Corporation (MARC), a non-profit research and GIS firm. MARC’s objective is to study the growing social and economic disparity and inefficient growth patterns in metropolitan areas and assist individuals and groups in promoting greater equity, local reinvestment, environmental protection through land-use planning, responsive regional-level decision making, and reduction in poverty. He was a participant in the American Planning Association’s Growing Smart Project. Mr. Orfield

OCR for page 113
served on the Committee on Improving the Future of U.S. Cities through Improved Metropolitan Area Governance. He has served five terms in the Minnesota House of Representatives and is currently the State Senator from southwest Minneapolis. Mr. Orfield did graduate work at Princeton University and has a law degree from the University of Chicago. He has practiced in the private sector and currently teaches at the University of Minnesota Law School. John Pickles is a Professor of Geography and the Earl N. Phillips Distinguished Chair in International Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research focus includes the way geographers understand science, space, and everyday life; political and cultural economy; geographic thought and social theory philosophy of science; political economy; regional development; and transition theory and democratization. He has studied the role of technological science in constructing rationalized and mapped worlds and has written about the social implications and limitations of GIS. Daniel Z. Sui is a Professor of Geography and holds the Reta A. Haynes endowed chair at Texas A&M University, College Station. His primary research interests include the integration of spatial analysis and modeling with GIS for socioeconomic and environmental applications, theoretical issues in geographic information sciences, and the emerging geographies of the information society. Dr. Sui teaches GIS courses, GIS-based spatial analysis and modeling, and advanced research seminars in urban and economic geography. He aims to make GIS a more robust decision-making tool, and has studied the integration of GIS and urban modeling, and GIS with remote sensing data to monitor land-use changes. Dr. Sui earned his Ph.D. in Geography from the University of Georgia. Paul A. Waddell is Associate Professor of Public Affairs and Associate Professor of Urban Design and Planning at the University of Washington. His research interests include transportation planning, urban development, GIS, and infrastructure planning. He has recently been guiding the development of a new urban simulation model for metropolitan policy and planning down to the parcel-level scale, to be used to make residential location choices, transportation and real estate development decisions, and price setting. He has a strong interest in connecting the model to housing policy questions. He earned his Ph.D. in political economy from the University of Texas at Dallas and his dissertation topic related to factors determining household choice.

OCR for page 113
National Research Council Staff Lisa M. Vandemark has a Ph.D. in Geography from Rutgers University and a M.S. in Human Ecology from the University of Brussels, Belgium. Her B.S. (nursing) is also from Rutgers University. Currently she is a Program Officer at the NRC’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Prior to this appointment she was a research associate at the Institute of Marine and Coastal Sciences, Rutgers University, and an intern at the National Science Resources Center at the Smithsonian Institution. Her research interests include environmental perception and decision making, international development, natural resource management, and the role of interdisciplinary studies in environmental protection. Monica R. Lipscomb is a Research Assistant for the NRC’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. She has completed coursework for a Master’s degree in Urban and Regional Planning at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, with a concentration in Environmental Planning and graduate certificate in International Development. Previously she served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Côte d’Ivoire and has worked as a biologist at the National Cancer Institute. She holds a B.S. in Environmental and Forest Biology from the State University of New York–Syracuse.