TABLE V.C.4 Comparison of Dose Coefficients for Ingestion of Radionuclides Used in NTPR Program with Values Currently Recommended by ICRP: II. Longer-Lived Radionuclides

 

Dose coefficient (rem μCi−1)a

Nuclideb

Kidneys

Pancreas

Large intestinec

Red bone marrow

Bone surfaces

Bladder Liver

Wall

60Co

5.7E-3

5.9E-3

4.0E-2

5.4E-3

4.0E-3

6.8E-3

6.2E-3

(5.3 y)

(5.2E-3)

(5.2E-3)

(4.1E-2)

(4.8E-3)

(4.1E-3)

(8.5E-3)

(6.3E-3)

89Sr

8.6E-4

8.6E-4

8.7E-2

5.2E-3

1.1E-2

8.6E-4

4.3E-4

(50.5 d)

(7.4E-4)

(7.4E-4)

(8.1E-2)

(1.8E-2)

(2.2E-2)

(7.7E-4)

(2.5E-3)

90Sr

6.0E-3

6.0E-3

7.8E-2

4.3E-1

8.6E-1

5.7E-3

3.0E-3

(28.8 y)

(2.4E-3)

(2.4E-3)

(8.1E-2)

(6.7E-1)

(1.5)

(2.4E-3)

(5.6E-3)

95Zr

4.2E-4

3.9E-4

2.9E-2

6.6E-4

3.3E-4

3.0E-4

9.0E-4

(64.0 d)

(4.4E-4)

(4.1E-4)

(2.9E-2)

(7.8E-4)

(1.9E-3)

(3.0E-4)

(4.1E-4)

106Ru

8.3E-3

8.3E-3

2.6E-1

8.3E-3

9.6E-3

8.3E-3

4.4E-3

(373 d)

(5.6E-3)

(5.6E-3)

(2.6E-1)

(5.6E-3)

(5.6E-3)

(5.6E-3)

(6.3E-3)

144Ce

2.4E-4

3.0E-5

2.5E-1

1.4E-4

1.5E-4

7.4E-4

7.3E-5

(285 d)

(7.4E-5)

(7.0E-5)

(2.4E-1)

(7.0E-4)

(1.2E-3)

(3.6E-3)

(1.1E-4)

152Eu

1.2E-3

6.6E-4

6.3E-2

9.8E-4

6.9E-4

2.6E-3

1.1E-3

(13.5 y)

(1.2E-3)

(1.2E-3)

(3.7E-2)

(2.2E-3)

(4.1E-3)

(5.9E-3)

(1.6E-3)

239Pud

6.3E-2

3.6E-3

2.0E-1

1.9E-1

2.6

4.9E-1

1.8E-3

 

(2.5E-3)

(1.0E-3)

(2.0E-1)

(2.9E-2)

(5.9E-1)

(1.3E-1)

(1.0E-3)

aFirst entry is value from Table 4a of Egbert et al. (1985) based on ORNL reports (Killough et al., 1978a; Dunning et al., 1979) and often used in dose reconstructions for atomic veterans; values are based on dosimetric and biokinetic models in ICRP Publication 30 (ICRP, 1979a). Second entry, in parentheses, is value currently recommended for adult workers by ICRP (1994a; 2002). All values assume GI-tract absorption fraction that applies to radionuclides in oxide form (Eckerman et al., 1988).

bEntry in parentheses is radionuclide half-life.

cWall of lower large intestine.

dDose coefficients apply to any mixtures of 239Pu and 240Pu, which have half-lives of 24,100 and 6,560 y, respectively.

[3] An assumption that inhaled particles are respirable (AMAD, 1 μm) should result in large overestimates of dose to the lung if most of the inhaled materials were large particles. Doses to other organs and tissues, except those in the GI tract in many cases, also should be overestimated.

Some dose reconstructions for atomic veterans assume that inhaled particles were respirable even when a substantial fraction of inhaled material probably consisted of large particles. As noted above and discussed in Section IV.C.2.2.1, an assumption of respirable particles often is used when the organ or tissue of concern is not the thyroid, an organ in the GI tract, or prostate, even in cases of inhalation of mostly large particles in descending fallout. Inhalation of large particles also could be important in other scenarios, such as exposure to fresh



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