Appendixes



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Appendixes

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Appendix A Biographic Information on the Committee to Review EPA’s Research Grants Program Harold Mooney (Chair) is the Paul S. Achilles Professor of Environmental Biology at Stanford University. He earned his Ph.D. from Duke University. Dr. Mooney’s research interests include physiologic plant ecology and ecosystem sciences, the study of adaptations of plants to diverse environments, atmosphere-vegetation interaction, ecosystem functioning of biodiversity, and invasion biology. He has received numerous awards and honors, including membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and fellowship in the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Dr. Mooney is secretary general of the International Council for Science and cochair of the Science Panel for the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. He has extensive service with the National Research Council, including membership on the Committee on Ecosystem Management for Sustainable Marine Fisheries and on the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Raymond Loehr (Vice Chair) is the H.M. Alharthy Centennial Chair and a professor of civil engineering at the University of Texas in Austin. He received a Ph.D. in sanitary engineering from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Loehr’s research interests include environmental health engineering, water and wastewater treatment, hazardous-waste treatment, industrial

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waste management, and land treatment of wastes. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and has served in several National Research Council activities, including the Committee on Remediation of PCBContaminated Sediments, the Committee on Research and Peer Review in EPA, and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Loehr was chair of the EPA Science Advisory Board from 1988 to 1994; he currently serves on the board’s Executive Committee and chairs its Research Strategies Advisory Committee. Anders Andren is director of the Sea Grant Institute of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and director of the University of Wisconsin Water Resources Institute. He is also professor of environmental chemistry and technology in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Andren received his Ph.D. in chemical oceanography from the Florida State University. His research interests include aquatic and atmospheric chemistry, geochemistry, and analytical chemistry. Dr. Andren is a member of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Advisory Council of Senior Research Managers and chair of the Sea Grant Program Mission Committee. From 1994 to 2000, he served as a member of the National Research Council Committee on Research and Peer Review in EPA. Edwin H. Clark, II, is president of Clean Sites Inc. in Alexandria, Virginia. He is the former secretary of natural resources and environmental control for the state of Delaware, vice president of the Conservation Foundation, and associate assistant administrator for pesticides and toxic substances in the Environmental Protection Agency. He holds a Ph.D. in applied economics from Princeton University. He has served as a member of the National Research Council Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology and on several committees, including the Committee on Risk-Based Criteria for Non-RCRA Hazardous Waste. Costel Denson is professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Delaware. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah. His research has focused on the rheology and processing of polymeric materials. Dr. Denson is a member of the National Research Council’s Committee on Air Quality Management in the United States and has served on the Ford Foundation Minority Predoctoral Review Panel on Engineering. He has also served as the chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the Environmental Protection Agency and is a member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education.

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John Elston is retired from serving as administrator for the Office of Air Quality Management in the New Jersey state Department of Environmental Protection. Mr. Elston holds an MS in environmental science from Rutgers University. As administrator he directed the planning, preparation, and tracking of progress for the state implementation plan for attainment and maintenance of the national ambient air quality standards under the Clean Air Act and plans for air-pollutant monitoring systems for the state. Carol Henry is the vice president for science and research at the American Chemistry Council (ACC, formerly the Chemical Manufacturers Association). She directs and manages ACC’s Long-Range Research Initiative that is designed to study the potential impacts of chemicals on health and the environment. Dr. Henry earned her Ph.D. in microbiology from the University of Pittsburgh. Her interests include the scientific foundation for assessing risks to health and the environment and the management of scientific research programs. Dr. Henry has served in senior management positions at the American Petroleum Institute, the Department of Energy, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and the International Life Sciences Institute’s Risk Science Institute. She serves as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology; as a member of the Science Advisory Board of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Defense, Department of Energy, and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA); and as a consultant to EPA’s Science Advisory Board. Martha A. Krebs is president of Science Strategies, a consulting firm. She served most recently as associate vice chancellor for research at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) and as the founding director of the California NanoSystems Institute at UCLA and UC, Santa Barbara. Dr. Krebs received her Ph.D. from the Catholic University of America. From 1993 to 2000, she served as assistant secretary of energy and director of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science, where she was responsible for the $3 billion basic-research program that underlay the department’s energy, environmental, and national-security missions. Before that, Dr. Krebs was associate director for planning and development at DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She serves on the Board of Trustees for the Institute for Defense Analyses and is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems. Dr. Krebs is a member of the American Physical Society, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Fellow of the Association of Women in Science.

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Richard Lee is professor of oceanography at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. He received his Ph.D. in marine biology from the Scripps Institute of Oceanography. His research interests include bioremediation, DNA damage and embryo developments in grass shrimp exposed to contaminants, and blue crab disease in coastal Georgia. Dr. Lee served on the National Research Council’s Committee on Marine Salvage. Gerald van Belle holds joint appointments as professor in the Department of Biostatistics and in the Department of Environmental Health at the University of Washington. He chaired the Department of Environmental Health from 1991 to 1998. Dr. van Belle received his Ph.D. in mathematical statistics from the University of Toronto. His research interests have focused on the use of statistics to study various environmental health issues related to Alzheimer’s disease, exposure to air pollutants, and drinkingwater quality. From 1993 to 1996, Dr. van Belle served as a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. In 1999, he was a member of the Particulate Matter Center Review Panel for the Environmental Protection Agency. Terry Young is senior consulting scientist at Environmental Defense in Oakland, California. She received her Ph.D. in agricultural and environmental chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley. Dr. Young is a member of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science Advisory Board (SAB) and serves as chair of the Ecological Processes and Effects Committee of the SAB. At Environmental Defense, she manages projects on water and sediment quality, wetland and riverine habitats, and the development of economic incentives for pollution control. Lauren Zeise is chief of the reproductive and cancer hazard assessment section of the California Environmental Protection Agency. She received her Ph.D. from Harvard University. Dr. Zeise’s research focuses on modeling human interindividual variability in metabolism and risk. She has served on advisory boards of the Environmental Protection Agency, the World Health Organization, the Office of Technology Assessment, and the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. She has also served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Risk Characterization, the Committee on Comparative Toxicology of Naturally Occurring Carcinogens, and the Committee on Copper in Drinking Water. Dr. Zeise is a member of the Committee on Toxicology and the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology.