independent position, you are automatically an enemy, not only of the state but of the society.

Unfortunately, these are powers that feel their authority waning, they know the march of history is against them, so they are shamelessly using any tactic at their disposal, whether it is smear campaigns in the media, other kinds of intimidation (which I will talk about later), imprisonment, trying to use the system of courts for the maintenance of their power and their position.

I should mention in this regard that for the five months before my husband was arrested—and one reason that my children and I were very frightened on the night that he disappeared—he had been receiving daily telephoned and mailed death threats to us. The people who called us purported to be Islamic militants who said that my husband’s defense of Coptic Christians in the country put him outside of religion and therefore he had to be killed, his family had to be eliminated, and the fact that he was an agent of foreign powers had to be exposed. So we really did not know for a number of hours who was holding my husband, but we now feel that this is all part of the kind of dirty tricks or shameless tactics that I was mentioning to you to intimidate freedom of expression.

Well, how did an academic who teaches, who is 62 years old—he is certainly not a young Turk, by any means—who runs a research center that looks into 10 or 20 different topics, how did he come to be caught in this crossfire between the forces within the state? I think in order to understand this, we need to look at the causes that my husband has been supporting over the last decade or so, and I will speak very briefly about some of these: one is secularism and tolerance of religious diversity; one is human rights; one is minority and women’s rights; and a final topic is democracy and democratic opening of society.

First of all, my husband, along with many others in Egypt, has been an advocate of secularism in an increasingly religiously polarized society. By secularism he does not mean the rejection of religious faith or religious participation in public life. He, in fact, cannot use that word in Arabic; it has come to be so much identified with a rejection of religion. But what he does mean is an understanding at the highest levels and a deep socialization of every citizen to respect and to tolerate the religious views of others, because we are a multiethnic and a multireligious society in Egypt.

However, the regime here has played a very dangerous game. On the one hand, they have been brutally repressing and jailing and eliminating Islamic militancy in society, and I have to admit that some of us who are afraid as well of those trends in our society have stood by silently, have not spoken out about the tactics that were used, about whether the rule of law has been applied in their trials and in their cases.

On the other hand, they have been allowing conservative religious forces that are pro-regime to have an increasing share of public space, so religious periodicals and publications, air time on television, hours in the curriculum in the schools have been steadily growing year after year. Those forces, when I say



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 71
independent position, you are automatically an enemy, not only of the state but of the society. Unfortunately, these are powers that feel their authority waning, they know the march of history is against them, so they are shamelessly using any tactic at their disposal, whether it is smear campaigns in the media, other kinds of intimidation (which I will talk about later), imprisonment, trying to use the system of courts for the maintenance of their power and their position. I should mention in this regard that for the five months before my husband was arrested—and one reason that my children and I were very frightened on the night that he disappeared—he had been receiving daily telephoned and mailed death threats to us. The people who called us purported to be Islamic militants who said that my husband’s defense of Coptic Christians in the country put him outside of religion and therefore he had to be killed, his family had to be eliminated, and the fact that he was an agent of foreign powers had to be exposed. So we really did not know for a number of hours who was holding my husband, but we now feel that this is all part of the kind of dirty tricks or shameless tactics that I was mentioning to you to intimidate freedom of expression. Well, how did an academic who teaches, who is 62 years old—he is certainly not a young Turk, by any means—who runs a research center that looks into 10 or 20 different topics, how did he come to be caught in this crossfire between the forces within the state? I think in order to understand this, we need to look at the causes that my husband has been supporting over the last decade or so, and I will speak very briefly about some of these: one is secularism and tolerance of religious diversity; one is human rights; one is minority and women’s rights; and a final topic is democracy and democratic opening of society. First of all, my husband, along with many others in Egypt, has been an advocate of secularism in an increasingly religiously polarized society. By secularism he does not mean the rejection of religious faith or religious participation in public life. He, in fact, cannot use that word in Arabic; it has come to be so much identified with a rejection of religion. But what he does mean is an understanding at the highest levels and a deep socialization of every citizen to respect and to tolerate the religious views of others, because we are a multiethnic and a multireligious society in Egypt. However, the regime here has played a very dangerous game. On the one hand, they have been brutally repressing and jailing and eliminating Islamic militancy in society, and I have to admit that some of us who are afraid as well of those trends in our society have stood by silently, have not spoken out about the tactics that were used, about whether the rule of law has been applied in their trials and in their cases. On the other hand, they have been allowing conservative religious forces that are pro-regime to have an increasing share of public space, so religious periodicals and publications, air time on television, hours in the curriculum in the schools have been steadily growing year after year. Those forces, when I say

OCR for page 71
“conservative,” I mean that they would like to view a society as containing only one faith, they would like that faith to dominate all public discourse, and they would prefer that the Coptic minority either go away, emigrate, or convert. This is a very dangerous game. It has resulted in the death of a number of intellectuals in Egypt and elsewhere who dared to speak out against these ideas. A periodical in Egypt, called El Acadeti [phonetic], which means “my belief,” has published a total of 62 personal attacks on Saad Eddin Ibrahim and the work of his center over the last two years. This, of course, creates a climate and a discourse that is very damaging to tolerance in society. Secondly, his advocacy of human rights and human rights standards: I am proud that he was a founder of the Arab human rights organization that has been mentioned earlier in this session, of the Egyptian organization for human rights, and he has been a real supporter of a whole young generation of human rights lawyers and activists in Egypt and in the Arab world. Unfortunately, the enemies of human rights have been able to equate this movement in the minds of most Egyptians with liberal Western values, and not just with liberal Western values but that debate is usually further narrowed to American interests and values. Of course, then, as passions become very heated about the Arab-Israeli conflict, American values become equated with unequivocal support for Israel in this conflict. So without any examination of what human rights defenders are saying or thinking, they are simply assumed to be agents of the United States and, therefore, of Israel, and they are sidelined in public discourse. I have to say, unfortunately, that this is a trap that many intellectuals in Egypt have fallen into. Because of their leftist leanings, because of their opposition to the peace process, because of their fear of the incursion of Western ideas of liberalization, they have branded and identified anyone associated with human rights with this kind of simplistic pro-American opposition. Just to give you an example of how that plays itself out right now in Egypt, a weekly periodical that is known to have close ties to our security forces and, in fact, to some of our media leaders, has published, now for two weeks in a row, articles and editorials that talked about my attendance at a national day at the Israeli embassy in Cairo in which I was given a standing ovation for my support of Israeli causes and human rights and the cause of Saad Eddin Ibrahim. Now, the fact that I was out of the country, in the United States, on the day that this reception occurred, and could not have attended it, did not bother the publishers of this article, nor is there anyone anywhere who is criticizing this kind of irresponsible press coverage, in order to further isolate those like my husband who take the views that they do. Thirdly, and a spin-off of general advocacy of human rights issues, has been my husband’s emerging support for the issues of the Coptic minority and women in Egypt, and I will not talk about women—I think that has been handled very adequately in the previous session, except to perhaps add on the issue of whether Iranian women can vote or not, that, in fact, it was women,

OCR for page 71
along with students, who brought this current moderate president to power in Iran. They are a very serious political force to be reckoned with. Back to the issue of the Coptic minority in Egypt, even though women’s issues have been taken up now by the state, by our first lady, by a number of prominent organizations and individuals, the Coptic issue remains a taboo in our society. One is not to write about it, one is not to speak about it, there is no organization representing the rights of Copts. The issue is a complicated one. The Coptic minority in Egypt are in fact better educated, they are better off occupationally than the Moslem majority, so in terms of the poverty that Egypt faces as a nation, this is a minority that is fairly well off. But in terms of political participation, in terms of their sense of having a role in society, whether the national curriculum gives time to their history and their issues, they very much have a feeling of second-class citizenship, and certainly sectarian violence has escalated in the time since the mid-1970s. My husband has insisted on crossing that red line, mentioning this topic, holding conferences, putting it always in the context of the other political forces and activities in the region, and for that he is now being tried and indicted for tarnishing Egypt’s image abroad by spreading lies and misinformation about religious discrimination in Egypt. Fourth, as an advocate of democracy in Egypt, my husband has also been branded as unpatriotic, as a treasonist, and it is not because of what he writes or what he says. Anyone can say anything they want about democracy in Egypt and probably get away with it, but he had the audacity to train young Egyptians to monitor the elections that were held for Parliament in 1995. There were many attempts to silence this effort, there was a commission that was formed. He was only one of several prominent Egyptians that were part of this commission but, rightly or wrongly, what happened is that over half of the districts in that election, where the results were contested, the findings of the reports of this monitoring committee were taken to the courts and used as evidence for irregularities in voting procedures. The courts accepted these documents, they found that the methodology, the way that the information had been collected was accurate and acceptable, and over half of the results in these districts were overturned. What that meant, of course, was great embarrassment and humiliation for the ruling party and for the regime, but anger on the part of the Ministry of the Interior, which was responsible for monitoring elections. So if you ask what was the timing of my husband’s arrest last summer, when, in fact, he had been saying and doing the same thing for many, many years, most theories would tell you that it was because he and others were beginning to make preparations for the monitoring of the October parliamentary elections. My husband is a very firm believer in the Kantian proposition that democracies do not go to war with one another, and this has led him to be a great proponent of peaceful resolution, of dialogue, and of negotiated

OCR for page 71
settlements of conflicts in our region. Injustice cannot be allowed to stand, but it should be corrected by resistance and not by waging wars. This has led him to be labeled as a peacemonger who uses the codes of civil society as a cover for asking the Arab world to capitulate in the Arab-Israeli conflict. In closing, I simply want to reiterate the point I have been trying to make, that the Egyptian society is far more complicated than simply a struggle between a state, on the one hand, and a monolithic civil society on the other. This is not a monolithic government and there are certainly multiple forces for change in our society that are all competing for public space. There is a great fear of change right now in the Arab world and in Egypt. I think that we who are in the West have to take some of the responsibility for the anger, for the feeling of injustice, that many times the plights of the Iraqi people, of the Palestinian people, of the Sudanese people, are not [considered] as weighty, are not taken as seriously as the rights and the injustices of other people, and this makes it extremely difficult for moderate voices, secular voices, the voices of human rights, to be heard in our society. Will the state get away with what it is currently attempting to do with my husband and 27 of his associates? My husband is an optimist, so I think he would, if he were sitting here today, tell you that he is optimistic in the long run. He believes that because of the work of institutions and individuals like yourselves Egypt will be forced to join the company of nations, will be forced to be held to its highest standards for itself, and we are more convinced than ever of the critical necessity of the voices inside societies like Egypt to join with the voices outside the society and not to fall prey to these reactionary and very despotic forces. Thank you very much.

OCR for page 71
DISCOURS DU MINISTRE BERNARD KOUCHNER Merci M.le Président, Mesdames et Messieurs, chère Flora Brovina, Je suis heureux d’être avec vous, un peu impressionné par ce splendide décor qui retrace I’importance de cet établissement, de cette Académie. Je vous remercie, M.le président, de me donner l’occasion de parler un peu de la science et des droits de l’homme et plus généralement de ce que j’ai appelé le droit d’ingérence et que M.Koffi Annan, Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies, préfère appeler le droit d’intervention humanitaire. Ce n’est pas à M.F.Jacob que j’apprendrai le militantisme. J’ai été frappé à chaque fois qu’entre Pierre Messmer et F.Jacob, le salut soit «Bonjour, cher compagnon». Voilà une confrérie, «les compagnons de la libération», un club bien fermé et bien chic auquel—c’est le seul au monde—j’aurai bien rêvé d’appartenir. J’étais trop jeune. Donc le militantisme chez un homme de science, chez un Prix Nobel, ne va pas de soi. D’ailleurs, le militantisme chez les hommes et les femmes, particulièrement dans notre pays, particulièrement durant la période de la dernière guerre, ne va pas de soi. Il a été le fait d’hommes et de femmes courageux et déterminés. Ce qui va de soi c’est la passivité, c’est le laisser aller, c’est le conservatisme. Hélas, on le voit aussi ces derniers jours, ce qui va de soi c’est l’oppression. Est-ce que les hommes de science sont des intellectuels et participent de cette catégorie un peu française des intellectuels? Je crois bien que cette définition des intellectuels ne soit pas si simple à énoncer. Il se trouve que dans les événements auxquels je fais allusion, c’est-à-dire la résistance, les intellectuels ont joué un grand rôle, les hommes de science aussi. Et même, je crois que l’un des premiers réseaux de résistance s’est développé chez les hommes de science et au Musée de l’homme en particulier. Est-ce qu’ils sont prédisposés? Est-ce que cette culture, cet engagement de recherches contre l’inconnu, d’innovation, de permanente énergie déployée pour percer les mystères de la nature, pour faire avancer le progrès, s’accompagne de résistance à l’oppression? Oui, je le crois profondément. Alors, puisque Flora Brovina vous a parlé bien mieux que je le ferais du Kosovo, je voudrais en dire un petit mot mais surtout vous dire pour moi ce que représentait cet engagement des médecins. Flora Brovina est médecin, pédiatre. Et c’est Flora Brovina que nous avons rencontrée la première en 1989/90 au moment où il nous était venu en France le bruit de l’empoisonnement des enfants du Kosovo. J’étais Ministre de l’action humanitaire, et personne n’y croyait: comment les autorités de Belgrade auraient pu? ou comment des gens mal intentionnés à l’intérieur du Kosovo pouvaient déployer une telle ingéniosité pour que dans les lycées, dans les écoles, dans les hôpitaux secondairement, il y ait ce syndrome massif d’empoisonnement avec des symptômes mal définis?

OCR for page 71
Personne n’y a cru et nous avons envoyé, j’ai envoye en tant que Ministre de l’action humanitaire, une équipe à Pristina qui était composee du Dr Michel Bonnot—qui continue de diriger la cellule d’urgence du Quai d’Orsay que nous avions créé—et Antoine Garapon—qui était un juge et qui depuis s’est intéressé au Kosovo puisqu’il est le president du comité Kosovo. Ils ont découvert ensemble ce Kosovo opprimé. Je ne vais pas vous parler tiès longtemps de cet empoisonnement, de ce que nous avons trouvé mais ça nous a permis de rencontrer Flora Brovina qui déjà était dévouée à la cause des enfants et à la cause du Kosovo. Cet engagement, cette découverte du reel, ce refus d’accepter l’oppression a entraîné un certain nombre de reactions qui se sont poursuivies. Cela a déterminé cette création du comité Kosovo et nous a conforté, nous les médecins—que l’on a appelés «Médecins sans Frontières», puis «Médecins du Monde», puis bref, les «French Doctors» — dans notre vision qui a quelque chose à voir avec le sujet d’aujourd’hui. Est-ce que la création de Médecins sans Frontières en 1971 et de Médecins du Monde en 1981 avait à voir avec la science? Oui, cela devait beaucoup à la pratique médicale. Le raisonnement fut médical qui nous a poussé à mettre au service des populations qui n’avaient pas de médecins et qui étaient opprimées, au service des malades auxquels on n’avait pas accès, des services réservés aux nationaux. Médecins sans Frontières, c’était assez simple: y avait-il des frontières à la souffrance? Devait-on accepter la souffrance dès lors qu’il était établi qu’elle était imposée par un autre gouvernement que le sien? C’était la question qui est toujours d’actualité. Puisqu’il y a une internationale des bourreaux puisqu’il y a une internationale de la souffrance, pourquoi n’y aurait-il pas une internationale des médecins? Mais cela n’était pas permis, cela n’était pas licite, il fallait faire évoluer le droit. Il ne faut pas compter sur les juristes seulement pour faire évoluer le droit. Il faut, à un moment donné—et j’y faisais allusion en parlant de Pierre Messmer et de F.Jacob—l’illégalité de la résistance. Elle est devenue légale parce qu’elle a gagné! Le «sans frontièrisme» n’a pas donné le droit mais a rendu plus evident que la souffrance appartient à tout le monde et pas seulement à ceux qui en sont la cause. À qui appartient la souffrance des autres? Voilà la question pour des médecins, pour des scientifiques. Le rôle des scientifiques dans la lutte au côté des dissidents de toute l’Europe communiste, par exemple, a été majeur. Dans des disciplines comme la physique, la chimie, la médecine, la psychiatrie, cette lutte a été très importante. À qui appartient la souffrance des autres? Si on s’en tient aux textes qui sont toujours en vigueur—mais ça change—la souffrance d’un homme, d’un peuple, d’un groupe minoritaire, appartient au gouvernement d’un pays qui abrite cette souffrance, la cause ou la cache. C’est sur la souveraineté des Etats que se fonde le droit international. Et les droits de l’homme, me direz-vous? Eh bien, ils n’ont rien a voir ou pas encore grandchose avec le Droit International, c’est une catégorie du droit complètement séparée, hélas.

OCR for page 71
Le Droit International existe. Il comprend en son sein le droit des conflits, le droit de la guerre, et—à l’intérieur de ce droit de la guerre—quelques eléments de droit humanitaire, mais pas des droits de l’homme. Les droits de l’homme sont une catégorie différente. (…) Nous sommes, en France, tenus de respecter le minimum de ces droits de l’homme et les droits de l’homme figurent dans le préambule de la Constitution. Mais pas partout, et dans les rapports internationaux les droits de l’homme sont depuis peu objets de I’attention. Et, ce que les French Doctors ont fait, ce que les militants ont fait, c’est tout simplement de rapprocher les droits de l’homme des droits nationaux: des droits que l’on peut exiger des nations. D’en faire une catégorie, cela n’est pas encore fait. Dans les rapports internationaux, les droits de l’homme commencent à être objet d’attentions et auront bientöt droit de cité. Il y a un grand débat qui s’estompe sur l’universalité des droits de l’homme: des gens très bien intentionnés ont prétendu que les droits de l’homme n’étaient pas identiques en fonction des cultures, en fonction des situations économiques, en fonction du développement. Des grands pays ont prétendu que les droits de l’homme étaient une ingérence occidentale. C’est le contraire de ce que je pense et si c’est une ingérence occidentale, pour moi c’est un bénéfice. Ce n’est pas un viol ni une effraction, c’est un apport positif. C’est comme si on disait que l’écologie est une ingérence: bien sur c’est une ingérence positive, M.Bush a bien tort de la refuser, et M.Bush que je sache n’est pas un représentant du tiers-monde! Cette notion d’ingérence, cette notion de viol, d’effraction a commencé non pas chez les hommes de science mais dans le droit chez nous lorsque, à propos des enfants battus, nous nous sommes aperçus que battre un enfant ne concernait pas seulement l’enfant ou sa famille ou celui qui exerçait des sévices mais la communauté toute entière. Et l’ingérence a commencé lorsqu’on nous a dit dans notre droit français—et cela a mis du temps et ne s’est toujours pas étendu aux femmes battues—que nous étions non seulement en devoir d’intervenir dans l’appartement d’a coté—ingérence majeure au droit de propriété, ingérence majeure à la souveraineté nationale—mais en «droit» de le faire. Devoir et droit: le devoir c’est une chose individuelle prise en compte par les militants, le droit c’est plus important encore. Nous étions en droit d’enfoncer la porte de I’appartement d’à côté pour interdire que l’on batte les enfants. Alors dans les états c’est en train d’être pareil, nous en sommes loin mais c’est pareil: nous, un jour, «Communauté Internationale», au nom du droit qui s’installe péniblement—et qui fait très peu de progrès dans notre pays la France où le droit d’ingérence est toujours une notion extraordinairement péjorative, hélas—nous connaîtrons un mécanisme international de protection des minorités. Et c’est ça le droit d’ingérence. Et c’est ça les enfants du Kosovo. Et c’était ça le Kosovo. Un jour nous pourrons dire «droit d’ingérence»—mais ce n’est pas demain la veille—et nous le dirons en prévention, en espérant que cela n’entraîne aucune conséquence guerrière, car le droit d’ingérence, l’intervention humanitaire de Koffi Annan et des Nations Unies—ce qui n’est pas rien—est un dispositif préventif.

OCR for page 71
Hélas, jusque-là nous avons toujours réagi tard, trop tard. Au Kosovo en particulier, nous sommes quelques-uns ici, nous avions demandé l’ntervention en 1992 lorsque M.Milosevic en 1989 a assis son pouvoir sur l’erreur historique qui a consisté à abolir l’autonomie du Kosovo que nous voulons rétablir dans la résolution 1244 des Nations Unies. Donc c’est par prévention qu’un jour nous dirons à un gouvernement, à un dictateur, à un groupe majoritaire: vous n’avez pas le droit d’opprimer votre minorité. On ne vous demande pas de l’aimer, on vous demande de ne pas la tuer. Il ne s’agit pas, bien entendu, d’un dispositif qui va entraîner pour chaque manifestation dans les rues ou pour chaque répression policière une guerre internationale. Il s’agit d’un dispositif de prévention. Un jour on saura. Et on commence à le savoir car le Droit International pénal change, car il y a un tribunal à La Haye. Mais ça c’est toujours trop tard: on met en accusation évidemment les responsables des exactions mais toujours après. Un jour on pourra le dire, je l’espère, le droit se dispose à cela: «Monsieur le dictateur, vous n’avez pas le droit de persécuter votre minorité, vous ne devez pas le faire, et nous avons éventuellement, mais ce ne sera pas nécessaire, les moyens internationaux de vous en empêcher». C’est une transformation profonde du droit mondial et cela prendra encore sans doute des dizaines d’années. L’exemple du Kosovo: ce qui s’est passé au Kosovo et ce qui s’est passé au Timor Est est un exemple pas encore réussi, hélas, mais nous sommes sur la bonne voie. Nous sommes intervenus dans le cadre de cette intervention humanitaire des Nations Unies pour protéger une minorité. Nous l’avons fait trop tard. Il aurait fallu le faire, je le répète, dans le début des années 90, mais nous l’avons fait. Et c’était inimaginable, il y a dix ans, vingt ans. Souvenez-vous du cas de Timor: il y a 25 ans que cela dure, c’était inimaginable de le faire, et cela a été fait, il y a eu un référendum, contrairement au Kosovo, et ce référendum s’est prononcé massivement en faveur de l’indépendance. Mais souvenez-vous des articles incendiaires de Noam Chomski à propos de cet exemple: il disait que c’est du colonialisme et regardez, vous ne faites rien à Timor. Oui, c’est vrai que ce fut très lent, trop lent, mais les progrès ont été tels que nous l’avons fait. Nous, la «Communauté internationale»... Cela ne doit jamais être un pays, et certainement pas un pays qui pour des raisons d’anciennes colonisations vienne donner des leçons au pays anciennement colonisé, c’est une détermination de la communauté internationale. Cela n’est jamais retour d’impérialisme. Cela ne doit pas être un pays seul. Maintenant parfois, comme pour le Rwanda, est-ce que c’est mieux ou non? On pourrait en discuter. Car il y a eu des retours de bâtons, des retours de l’histoire. Le Rwanda, c’était un génocide programmé qui s’est déroulé sous nos yeux. Et j’y étais. Et nous enragions tous les jours. Dix-neuf pays africains en particulier avaient promis d’intervenir. Et nous n’avons pas pu le faire. Il y a des retours de l’histoire terriblement dommageables. Mais je crois que le Kosovo fut un exemple. Nous avons tirés les leçons de la Bosnie. Les contacts qui s’étaient noués entre des hommes de science, les médecins, les intellectuels, en Bosnie comme au Kosovo, étaient très forts. Nous ne sommes intervenus militairement en Bosnie que bien trop tard et il y a eu 250 000 morts. Et lorsque la détermination de Jacques Chirac, de la

OCR for page 71
particulier avaient promis d’intervenir. Et nous n’avons pas pu le faire. Il y a des retours de l’histoire terriblement dommageables. Mais je crois que le Kosovo fut un exemple. Nous avons tirés les leçons de la Bosnie. Les contacts qui s’étaient noués entre des hommes de science, les médecins, les intellectuels, en Bosnie comme au Kosovo, étaient très forts. Nous ne sommes intervenus militairement en Bosnie que bien trop tard et il y a eu 250 000 morts. Et lorsque la détermination de Jacques Chirac, de la France, s’est faite jour au côté des britanniques, cela a préparé l’intervention de l’OTAN. Et en quelques semaines, alors que, souvenez vous-en qu’est-ce qu’on a entendu: «c’était impossible, on ne pouvait pas le faire», certains militaires disant que c’était absolument techniquement impossible, etc., et puis cela a été fait. Je ne dis pas que les accords de Dayton soient merveilleux mais posons-nous la question: est-ce que la paix actuelle est (end of tape).