Appendix A
Committee Biosketches

William Chameides (Chair) is regents professor of earth and atmospheric studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include atmospheric chemistry; tropospheric gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemistry; air pollution; global chemical cycles; biospheric-atmospheric interaction; and global and regional environmental change. His NRC service includes being the chair of the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and the Committee on Ozone-Forming Potential of Reformulated Gasoline, and a member of the Committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a former member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Chameides has a B.A. degree from the State University of New York at Binghamton, and M.Ph. and Ph.D. degrees in geology and geophysics from Yale University.


Daniel Greenbaum (Vice Chair) is the president and chief executive officer of the Health Effects Institute, an independent research institute funded jointly by government and industry to provide research on the health effects of air pollution. At the Health Effects Institute, Mr. Greenbaum has overseen the development and implementation of a research plan that focuses the Institute’s efforts on providing critical research and reanalysis on particulate matter, air toxics, and alternative fuels. In 1999, he served as chair of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline, which made recommendations on how to preserve the air pollution benefits of Reformulated Gasoline while preventing water



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Air Quality Management in the United States Appendix A Committee Biosketches William Chameides (Chair) is regents professor of earth and atmospheric studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research interests include atmospheric chemistry; tropospheric gas-phase and aqueous-phase chemistry; air pollution; global chemical cycles; biospheric-atmospheric interaction; and global and regional environmental change. His NRC service includes being the chair of the Committee on Atmospheric Chemistry and the Committee on Ozone-Forming Potential of Reformulated Gasoline, and a member of the Committee on Tropospheric Ozone Formation and Measurement. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and a former member of the National Research Council (NRC) Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Dr. Chameides has a B.A. degree from the State University of New York at Binghamton, and M.Ph. and Ph.D. degrees in geology and geophysics from Yale University. Daniel Greenbaum (Vice Chair) is the president and chief executive officer of the Health Effects Institute, an independent research institute funded jointly by government and industry to provide research on the health effects of air pollution. At the Health Effects Institute, Mr. Greenbaum has overseen the development and implementation of a research plan that focuses the Institute’s efforts on providing critical research and reanalysis on particulate matter, air toxics, and alternative fuels. In 1999, he served as chair of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Blue Ribbon Panel on Oxygenates in Gasoline, which made recommendations on how to preserve the air pollution benefits of Reformulated Gasoline while preventing water

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Air Quality Management in the United States contamination from methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and other additives. Prior to joining the Health Effects Institute, he served as commissioner of the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection. He currently serves as a member of the NRC Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Particulate Matter and a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Mr. Greenbaum earned his Masters of City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Carmen Benkovitz is a scientist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Her research interests include mathematical modeling of transport and transformation of trace species in the atmosphere, and compilation and analyses of inventories of pollutant emissions to the atmosphere. She has previously served as principal investigator for a multitude of studies including Chemical and Microphysical Aerosol Model, Analysis of Air Pollution and Greenhouse Gases, Compilation and Analyses of Emissions Inventories for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA’s) Atmospheric Chemistry Project, and Global Emissions Inventories for Aerosol Research. Dr. Benkovitz received her Ph.D. in atmospheric sciences from New York University. Eula Bingham is a professor of environmental health in the College of Medicine at the University of Cincinnati. Previously, she served as vice president and university dean for graduate studies at the University of Cincinnati and as Assistant Secretary of Labor for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. She earned a Ph.D. in zoology at the University of Cincinnati. Dr. Bingham has served on several committees of the National Research Council including the Committee to Review the Structure and Performance of the Health Effects Institute and the Committee on Structure of Environmental Research in the United States. Her research interests include toxicology, chemical carcinogenesis, pulmonary defense mechanisms, regulatory toxicology, and occupational and environmental health. Dr. Bingham is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Michael Bradley is president of M.J. Bradley & Associates. He formed MJB&A to provide private industry, nonprofit organizations, and government agencies with advice on air quality policy. Prior to founding MJB&A, Mr. Bradley was executive director of Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM) for 12 years. As executive director, he played a lead role in the Ozone Transport Commission’s development of the NOx budget program. Mr. Bradley also helped to shape the nonattainment, motor vehicle, and acid rain provisions in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. In 1997, he founded the Clean Energy Group, which consists of electric generating companies committed to working with policy

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Air Quality Management in the United States makers and other stakeholders to promote effective environmental policy options in the areas of air quality and climate change. He is a member of the EPA’s Clean Air Act Advisory Committee. Mr. Bradley earned his M.S. degree in Environmental Management from the University of Washington. Richard Burnett is a senior research scientist with the Healthy Environments and Consumer Safety Branch of Health Canada, where he has been working since 1983 on issues relating to the heath effects of outdoor air pollution. He is also an adjunct professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Community Medicine at the University of Ottawa. He received his Ph.D. from Queen’s University in Mathematical Statistics. Dr. Burnett’s work has focused on the use of administrative health and environmental information to determine the public health impacts of combustion related pollution using nonlinear random effects models, time series, and spatial analytical techniques. Dallas Burtraw is a senior fellow in the Quality of the Environment Division at Resources for the Future. His research interests include restructuring of the electric utility market, the social costs of environmental pollution and benefit-cost and cost-effectiveness analysis of environmental regulation. Dr. Burtraw has investigated the effects on electric utilities of the emission-permit trading program legislated under the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act. He has also evaluated the benefits of sulfur dioxide emission reductions as related to Title IV. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan. Laurence Caretto is professor of mechanical engineering at California State University, Northridge (CSUN). He received his Ph.D. in engineering from the University of California, Los Angeles. Dr. Caretto served as chair of the Department of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering and Associate Dean of the College of Engineering and Computer Science. He was a partner at Sierra Research, a private firm that consults on federal and state regulations on air quality and emissions standards. Dr. Caretto served as a member and vice chair of the California Air Resources Board. His research interests are in combustion-generated air pollution and computational fluid dynamics. Costel Denson is professor of chemical engineering at the University of Delaware. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Utah. His research has focused on the rheology and processing of polymeric materials and he is a fellow of the Society of Plastics Engineers. Dr. Denson has served as vice provost for Research at the University of Delaware where he was responsible for the administration of all aspects of the research enterprise. He has served as chair of EPA’s Board of Scientific Counselors

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Air Quality Management in the United States that conducted a management review of EPA’s research laboratories and centers and also of its particulate matter research program. Dr. Denson has also served as a member of the National Science Foundation Advisory Committee for Environmental Research and Education. He is a past chair of the Materials Task Force at the Military Engineering Center of Excellence. Dr. Denson is currently a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. Charles Driscoll is a distinguished professor of civil and environmental engineering and university professor of environmental systems engineering at Syracuse University. His research interests include aquatic chemistry, biogeochemistry, soil chemistry, and water quality modeling. He is on the Board of Directors at the Upstate Freshwater Institute and the Hubbord Brock Research Foundation. He was a member of the NRC Panel on Processes of Lake Acidification. Dr. Driscoll received his Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Cornell University. Jane Hall is a professor of economics at the College of Business and Economics, California State University, and co-director of the Institute for Economic and Environmental Studies. Dr. Hall has taught a variety of classes in the fields of economics and environmental studies, and her current research areas include assessing the value of environmental protection, economics of air pollution policy, environmental resource scarcity, and scarcity and conflict. She received her M.S. at the University of California, Berkeley, in agricultural and resource economics and her Ph.D. at the University of California, Berkeley, in energy and resources. Philip Hopke is the Bayard D. Clarkson Distinguished Professor in the Departments of Chemical Engineering at Clarkson University and holds appointments in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Hopke received his Ph.D. in physical and environmental chemistry from Princeton University and was a research associate at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. After 4 years as an assistant professor of chemistry at the State University College at Fredonia, NY, he joined the University of Illiniois as a visiting assistant professor of chemistry. He then joined the Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) as an assistant professor of chemistry and eventually became professor of environmental chemistry with joint appointments in the Departments of Civil Engineering and Nuclear Engineering. He moved to Clarkson University in 1989. In 1991 he won the Principal Investigator Award in Air Quality Research from the Ontario Ministry of the Environment. Dr. Hopke has served on multiple NRC committees, including the Committee on Advances in Assessing Human Exposure to Airborne Pollut-

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Air Quality Management in the United States ants, the Committee on Risk Assessment of Hazardous Air Pollutants, the Committee on Risk Assessment for Radon in Drinking Water, and the Committee on Research Priorities for Airborne Pollutants. Arnold Howitt is executive director of the Taubman Center for State and Local Government at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, where he is also adjunct lecturer in public policy. His recent research focuses on transportation, environmental regulation, and urban physical development issues. He also is director of a U.S. Justice Department-sponsored research program on domestic preparedness for terrorism. He is currently a member of an Institute of Medicine panel on evaluation of the Metropolitan Medical Response System program. Dr. Howitt has written widely on intergovernmental relations, including a report Linking Transportation and Air Quality Planning: Implementation of the Transportation Conformity Regulations in 15 Nonattainment Areas. He received his Ph.D. in political science from Harvard University. C. S. Kiang is dean of the College of Environmental Sciences at Peking University. His research interests include atmospheric chemistry, numerical modeling, environmental science, and phase transition of global changes. Dr. Kiang was the founding director of the Southern Oxidant Studies, founding director of the Atmospheric Sciences program at Georgia Tech, and a member of the NRC Global Climate Change Study Panel in China and the Executive Committee for Global Atmospheric Measurement of Tropospheric Aerosol and Gases. Dr. Kiang earned his Ph.D. in physics at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Beverly Law is research associate professor, Department of Forest Science, at Oregon State University, and science chair of the AmeriFlux network of approximately 45 research sites in the Americas. Her research interests include the influence of climate, age, and management on terrestrial ecosystem processes, ecophysiology, forest-atmosphere interaction, ecosystem process modeling, and remote sensing of vegetation characteristics. Previously, she participated in indicator development and design of EPA’s Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program—Forests (EMAP-Forests, now Forest Health Monitoring Program implemented by the U.S. Forest Service). She is on the editorial boards of the journals Oecologia and Global Change Biology. James Lents is director of the Environmental Policy and Corporate Affiliates Program at the University of California at Riverside. Dr. Lents joined the University after a 27-year career in managing air quality improvement projects nationwide, including 11 years as executive officer of the South

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Air Quality Management in the United States Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) in Diamond Bar, California. His experience includes work in defining the emissions inventory development, modeling, and emissions control process for Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Denver, Colorado. His work in Colorado included oversight of the emissions inventory development and modeling and control efforts to evaluate oil production during the oil shale boom of the late 1970s and early 1980s. At the SCAQMD, Dr. Lents oversaw development of the first Air Quality Management Plan ever to be approved by EPA for the Los Angeles area. Dr. Lents’ research experience includes work on combustion processes and measurement of air pollutants from jet and rocket engines and coal-fired electrical generation processes. Dr. Lents received his Ph.D. from Universty of Tennessee (Space Institute) in physics. Denise Mauzerall is an assistant professor at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University. Her research examines transboundary air pollution from both the science and policy perspectives. She attempts to use the science of global change to contribute to the formation of farsighted environmental policy. Before coming to Princeton University, Dr. Mauzerall was a post-doc at the National Center for Atmospheric Research where she helped develop and used a global 3-dimensional photochemical model to examine the effect of fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning in Asia on global air pollution. She has also worked for EPA in the Global Change Division of the Office of Air and Radiation. Her current areas of research include a comparison of the relative contribution of different regions of the world to global air pollution and how those contributions will evolve as development progresses; the impact of ozone on agriculture in Asia; and an examination of the current nitric oxide emissions trading program in the United States. She is a contributing author to the 2001 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) WGI and WGIII assessments. Dr. Mauzerall received her Ph.D. in atmospheric chemistry from Harvard University. Thomas McGarity is W. James Kronzer Chair in Trial and Appellate Advocacy at the University of Texas School of Law. He was articles editor of the Texas Law Review. Thomas McGrarity has studied both administrative law and environmental law. He also teaches torts. He is currently serving as co-reporter for rulemaking on the American Bar Association’s restatement project of the Administrative Procedures Act and related statutes. He received his J.D. from the University of Texas. Jana Milford is an associate professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her research interests include photochemical air quality modeling, with applications to issues such as the effects on urban

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Air Quality Management in the United States air quality of alternative fuels for motor vehicles and the effects on the upper troposphere of subsonic aircraft. Dr. Milford is a former member of the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission, which oversees state regulations for air quality. She has served on review boards for the Transportation Research Board of the National Academy of Sciences and is a consultant to the Science Advisory Board of EPA. Dr. Milford received her Ph.D. in engineering and public policy from Carnegie Mellon University. She is also a J.D. candidate at the University of Colorado School of Law. Michael Morris is director of transportation for the North Central Texas Council of Governments, the metropolitan planning organization for Dallas-Fort Worth. He is responsible for travel demand forecasting and for conforming transportation planning with EPA’s requirements. In addition, he administers the congestion mitigation/air quality program in four nonattainment counties. Mr. Morris holds a master’s degree in civil engineering from the State University of New York at Buffalo. He is a licensed professional engineer and served on the National Academy Committee reviewing the EPA Mobile Source Emissions Factor (MOBILE) software. Spyros Pandis is Elias Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering and Engineering and Public Policy in Carnegie Mellon University. His research interests include atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric pollution modeling, aerosol science, global change, and environmental policy analysis. He is the author of many articles and a book on these topics. He has served on several EPA, National Science Foundation (NSF), and North American Research Strategy for Tropospheric Ozone (NARSTO) review panels and committees. He is a former member of the NRC committee reviewing the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy’s research plan for fine particulates. Dr. Pandis received his Ph.D. in chemical engineering at the California Institute of Technology. P. Barry Ryan is professor of exposure assessment and environmental chemistry in the Department of Environmental and Occupational Health at the Rollins School of Public Health of Emory University with a joint appointment as professor in the Department of Chemistry. Before joining the faculty at Emory in 1995, Dr. Ryan was associate professor of environmental health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He earned his Ph.D. in computational chemistry from Wesleyan University. Research conducted by Dr. Ryan focuses on multimedia, multipollutant human exposure assessment and nontraditional pathways of exposure. Adel Sarofim is Presidential Professor in the College of Engineering at the University of Utah and senior technical advisor to Reaction Engineering

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Air Quality Management in the United States International in Salt Lake City. His research interests include radiative heat transfer, combustion, furnace design, applied chemical kinetics, and air pollution control and he is noted for his work with energy and the environment. Dr. Sarofim has served on several NRC committees including the Committee on Chemical Engineering Frontiers, the Committee on Chemicals in the Environment, and the Committee on Health Effects of Waste Incineration. He also served on EPA’s Science Advisory Board and its Strategic Research Subcommittee. Dr. Sarofim received his Sc.D. in chemical engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Sverre Vedal is a senior faculty member in the Division of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences at the National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, Colorado, and professor in the departments of preventive medicine and biometrics and of medicine, at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. His primary research interest is the health effects of environmental air pollution. He is currently a member of the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) of EPA and a member of the Review Committee of the Health Effects Institute. Dr. Vedal received his M.D. from the University of Colorado and an M.Sc. in epidemiology from the Harvard School of Public Health. Lauren Zeise is chief of the Reproductive and Cancer Hazard Assessment Section of the California Environmental Protection Agency. Dr. Zeise’s research focuses on modeling human interindividual variability in metabolism and risk. She has served on advisory boards of EPA, World Health Organization (WHO), U.S. Congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA), National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), Institute of Medicine (IOM), and NRC committees on risk characterization, comparative toxicology of naturally occurring carcinogens, toxicology, and copper in drinking water. Dr. Zeise is a member of the NRC Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology. She received her Ph.D. in applied sciences from Harvard University.