C
Biographies of Committee Members

RONALD R. FOGLEMAN is chairman and CEO, Durango Aerospace. He retired in 1997 as the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force after 34 years of active duty. As a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he served as a key military advisor to the Secretary of Defense, the National Security Council, and the President of the United States. With extensive operational and flight experience, General Fogleman held many senior command positions throughout his career, including Commander in Chief of the U.S. Transportation Command and Commander of the Air Mobility Command, in which he managed the operation of a complex air transportation system that interfaced with commercial airlines and the National Airspace System. After retirement, General Fogleman became president and COO of Durango Aerospace, Inc., an aviation consulting firm. He has chaired an Air Force Research Laboratory study on directed energy weapons for tactical platforms and has served as a member of NASA’s Mars Program Independent Assessment Team, the congressionally mandated Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization (the Rumsfeld Commission), and the Defense Policy Board.


JACK CLEMONS is the senior vice president of Lockheed Martin Transportation and Security Solutions in Rockville, Maryland. Mr. Clemons began his career at General Electric Corporation’s Reentry Systems Division in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. He worked on the NASA Apollo and Skylab programs for the TRW Systems Group in Houston, Texas, and on the NASA Space Shuttle program for IBM in Houston. Mr. Clemons joined Lockheed Martin’s Air Traffic Management Company in 1992 as functional manager of software development and was director of en route programs, vice president for air traffic control engineering, and then senior vice president of engineering, technology and operations before taking his current assignment. Mr. Clemons graduated from the University of Florida with B.S. and M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering. Mr. Clemons contributed to the committee an industry perspective on the practical aspects of developing and fielding capacity, safety, and security enhancements to the U.S. air traffic control system.


WILLIAM B. COTTON is president of Flight Safety Technologies, Inc. Throughout the aviation industry, Captain Cotton is known as the “father of free flight,” the air traffic management operating concept that is currently being developed and implemented to increase the safety, capacity, and operating efficiency in the nation’s air traffic control system. His career includes 33 years with United Airlines, during which time he gained expertise in the areas of air traffic control and cockpit operating systems. While working for United, Captain Cotton held various positions, including manager of air traffic and flights systems and chairman of the board for Aeronautical Telecommunications Network Systems, Inc. He has a B.S. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the University of Illinois and an M.S. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.


EUGENE E. COVERT, NAE, is the T. Wilson Professor of Aeronautics, emeritus, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His long and distinguished career in aerospace has spanned over 40 years in academia and has included additional stints as chief scientist of the U.S. Air Force, member and chairman of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, chairman of the Power and Propulsion panel of NATO’s Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development, director of the Wright Brothers Facility, member or chair of numerous NRC study committees, and chairman of the NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. Dr. Covert’s experience provided an important perspective on trends in aeronautical research and development, particularly with regard to propulsion.



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Securing the Future of U.S. Air Transportation: A System in Peril C Biographies of Committee Members RONALD R. FOGLEMAN is chairman and CEO, Durango Aerospace. He retired in 1997 as the Chief of Staff of the U.S. Air Force after 34 years of active duty. As a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, he served as a key military advisor to the Secretary of Defense, the National Security Council, and the President of the United States. With extensive operational and flight experience, General Fogleman held many senior command positions throughout his career, including Commander in Chief of the U.S. Transportation Command and Commander of the Air Mobility Command, in which he managed the operation of a complex air transportation system that interfaced with commercial airlines and the National Airspace System. After retirement, General Fogleman became president and COO of Durango Aerospace, Inc., an aviation consulting firm. He has chaired an Air Force Research Laboratory study on directed energy weapons for tactical platforms and has served as a member of NASA’s Mars Program Independent Assessment Team, the congressionally mandated Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization (the Rumsfeld Commission), and the Defense Policy Board. JACK CLEMONS is the senior vice president of Lockheed Martin Transportation and Security Solutions in Rockville, Maryland. Mr. Clemons began his career at General Electric Corporation’s Reentry Systems Division in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania. He worked on the NASA Apollo and Skylab programs for the TRW Systems Group in Houston, Texas, and on the NASA Space Shuttle program for IBM in Houston. Mr. Clemons joined Lockheed Martin’s Air Traffic Management Company in 1992 as functional manager of software development and was director of en route programs, vice president for air traffic control engineering, and then senior vice president of engineering, technology and operations before taking his current assignment. Mr. Clemons graduated from the University of Florida with B.S. and M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering. Mr. Clemons contributed to the committee an industry perspective on the practical aspects of developing and fielding capacity, safety, and security enhancements to the U.S. air traffic control system. WILLIAM B. COTTON is president of Flight Safety Technologies, Inc. Throughout the aviation industry, Captain Cotton is known as the “father of free flight,” the air traffic management operating concept that is currently being developed and implemented to increase the safety, capacity, and operating efficiency in the nation’s air traffic control system. His career includes 33 years with United Airlines, during which time he gained expertise in the areas of air traffic control and cockpit operating systems. While working for United, Captain Cotton held various positions, including manager of air traffic and flights systems and chairman of the board for Aeronautical Telecommunications Network Systems, Inc. He has a B.S. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the University of Illinois and an M.S. in aeronautical and astronautical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. EUGENE E. COVERT, NAE, is the T. Wilson Professor of Aeronautics, emeritus, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His long and distinguished career in aerospace has spanned over 40 years in academia and has included additional stints as chief scientist of the U.S. Air Force, member and chairman of the Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, chairman of the Power and Propulsion panel of NATO’s Advisory Group for Aerospace Research and Development, director of the Wright Brothers Facility, member or chair of numerous NRC study committees, and chairman of the NRC’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. Dr. Covert’s experience provided an important perspective on trends in aeronautical research and development, particularly with regard to propulsion.

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Securing the Future of U.S. Air Transportation: A System in Peril WILLARD J. DODDS has expertise in propulsion emissions technology and regulations. He is a consulting engineer for aircraft engine environmental issues at GE Aircraft Engines, one of two U.S. manufacturers of large jet engines. He is an expert in all aspects of aircraft engine combustion system design and development, including the design and development of high-performance and low-emission combustion systems. As such, he has an expert knowledge of engine emissions abatement technology and relevant regulatory considerations. He is currently chair of the International Coordinating Council of Aerospace Industries Association’s Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions Committee. In that capacity, he is the primary industry representative for interactions with the International Civil Aviation Organization on engine noise and emissions regulatory issues. Noise and emissions are long-term problems facing aviation, and Mr. Dodds helped the committee address this issue. He served on one other NRC committee. WILLIAM W. HOOVER is currently a consultant for aviation, defense, and energy matters. He is the former executive vice president of the Air Transport Association of America, where he represented the interests of the U.S. major airlines industry, particularly related to technical, safety, and security issues. Prior to holding this position, he served as the assistant secretary, Defense Programs, U.S. Department of Energy, where he was responsible for the U.S. nuclear weapons development program, including production, research, testing, safety, and security. He is also a major general, USAF (retired), and held positions of responsibility within NATO, at the Pentagon with the Secretary of the Air Force, and in Vietnam, where he commanded a combat air wing and flew as a fighter pilot. General Hoover was a member or chair of several other NRC study committees and currently serves as chairman of the National Research Council’s Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board. He holds a B.S. in engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy, an M.S. in aeronautical engineering from the Air Force Institute of Technology, and is a distinguished graduate of the National War College. S. MICHAEL HUDSON recently retired as vice chairman of Rolls-Royce North America. After Allison Engine Company was acquired by Rolls-Royce, Mr. Hudson served as president, chief executive officer, chief operating officer, and a member of the board of directors of Allison Engine Company, Inc. Previously, during his tenure at Allison, he served as executive vice president for engineering, chief engineer for advanced technology engines, chief engineer for small production engines, supervisor of the design for Model 250 engines, chief of preliminary design, and chief project engineer in vehicular gas turbines. Mr. Hudson brings insight into propulsion engineering issues, related business issues, and the European perspective on aviation issues. Mr. Hudson served on three other NRC committees. NANCY G. LEVESON, NAE, received degrees in mathematics, management, and computer science from the University of California, Los Angles (Ph.D. in 1980) and subsequently worked as a computer science professor at the University of California, Irvine. In 1993 she became the Boeing Professor of Computer Science and Engineering at the University of Washington. She is now at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as a professor of aeronautics and astronautics, where her primary interests lie in software engineering and software and system safety. Dr. Leveson is a member of the board of directors of the Computing Research Association, a member of the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Committee on Computers and Public Policy, a consultant to the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel, a fellow of the ACM, a former member of the advisory committee of the NRC’s Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, and a former member or chair of numerous NRC study committees. She was awarded the ACM 1999 Allen Newell Award for contributions to computer science research and the 1995 AIAA Information Systems award. Dr. Leveson helped the committee address the potential benefits and limitations of using advanced information technology in aircraft and air transportation systems. RICHARD MARCHI is currently senior vice president, technical and environmental affairs, for the Airports Council International-North America (ACI-NA). He is responsible for overall supervision, direction, and coordination of the staff and activities of the ACI-NA Technical and Environmental Affairs Department. The department provides staff support to five ACI-NA committees: Technical Affairs, Environmental Affairs, Small Airports, Business Information Technologies, and Public Safety and Security. He is also responsible for the development, coordination, and presentation of technical, security, telecommunications, and environmental policies for consideration by the ACI-NA board of directors, as well as preparation of responses to governmental issues of concern to airports, and for developing airport testimony on technical matters. He is the association’s focal point representative in preparations for International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) technical and environmental matters affecting member airports. Mr. Marchi is an active member of several FAA advisory committees and task forces, including the FAA Free Flight Select Committee, the FAA Research, Engineering and Development Advisory Committee, where he serves as chairman of the Airport Technology Research Subcommittee, and the FAA New Large Aircraft Facilitation Group. RICHARD R. PAUL is vice president, strategic development, for the Boeing Company’s Phantom Works in Seattle. The Phantom Works is Boeing’s research and development organization; it is focused on technology development, process improvement, and new product development. Mr. Paul joined Boeing in October 2000 after 33 years with the U.S.

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Securing the Future of U.S. Air Transportation: A System in Peril Air Force. During his Air Force career, he served in two Air Force laboratories and in his last assignment he served in a dual-hatted position as the Air Force Technology Executive Officer and commander of the Air Force Research Laboratory. Mr. Paul is a member of the NRC’s Air Force Science and Technology Board and a former member of one other NRC study committee. He contributed to this committee expertise and experience from both the Department of Defense and industry. AMY R. PRITCHETT is an associate professor in the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering and a joint associate professor in the School of Aerospace Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Her research encompasses cockpit design, including advanced decision aids; procedure design as a mechanism to define and test the operation of complex, multiagent systems such as air traffic control systems; and simulation of complex systems to assess changes in emergent system behavior in response to implementation of new information technology. Dr. Pritchett is the editor of Simulation: Transactions of the Society for Modeling and Simulation for the air traffic area; associate editor of the AIAA Journal of Aerospace Computing, Information, and Communication; technical program chair for the aerospace technical group of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society; and co-chair of the 2004 International Conference in Human-Computer Interaction in Aerospace (HCI-Aero). Dr. Pritchett contributed to the committee’s investigation of system modeling and automation. ROBERT J. RAVERA established RJR Aviation, LLC, after retiring from the MITRE Corporation, where he served as vice president for operations in the Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD). Dr. Ravera now consults on a broad range of aviation and transportation issues, including air traffic control automation; communications, navigation, and surveillance; security; intelligent transportation systems; and infrastructure. At MITRE, he had a key role in overseeing CAASD’s work for the Federal Aviation Administration and supported development of MITRE’s international aviation program. Other work at MITRE involved Dr. Ravera in modeling and simulation, navigation and surveillance, and other aspects of air traffic control, all of which contributed to the committee’s Phase 2 activities. SANFORD REDERER is president of Aviation Planning & Finance, a small consulting firm. He works as a consultant on airline route and fleet planning, business strategy and marketing programs, aircraft finance, and airport demand management (methods for allocating scarce airfield and facilities access). Clients since 1990 have included airlines, airports, government agencies, airframe and engine manufacturers, and financial institutions in the United States and abroad. Before founding Aviation Planning & Finance, Mr. Rederer was senior vice president-strategic planning at Trans World Airlines, with responsibility for route and fleet planning, merger evaluation and planning, aircraft acquisition, aircraft sales, and alliance development. He served on the staff of the Civil Aeronautics Board in 1977-1980 in several positions, including director of the Bureau of International Aviation, in which position he helped negotiate significant liberalization of the Bermuda 2 bilateral air services agreement. Mr. Rederer earned an A.B. degree in economics from Hamilton College and an M.A. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley, and is a veteran of the U.S. Army. Mr. Rederer brings to the committee important experience in airline economics, planning, and management. HERBERT H. RICHARDSON, NAE, is director of the Texas Transportation Institute and associate vice chancellor for engineering at the Texas A&M University system. He is also Regents Professor and Distinguished Professor of Engineering at the university. From 1991 to 1993 he was chancellor of the Texas A&M University System. Before joining Texas A&M in 1984, he was associate dean of engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he began his academic career in 1955. He was head of MIT’s Mechanical Engineering Department from 1974 to 1982. On leave from MIT, he was chief scientist for the U.S. Department of Transportation from 1970 to 1972. He has served on many NAE and NRC committees, including the Council of the NAE and the NRC Governing Board. He chaired TRB’s executive committee, the Committee for the Critique of the Federal Research Program on Magnetic Levitation Systems, and the Committee for a Study of the Railroad Tank Car Design Process. He was co-chair of the Committee for the Study of Geometric Design Standards for Highway Improvements and vice chair of the Committee for a Review of the National Automated Highway System Consortium Research Program. Dr. Richardson earned a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from MIT and brings a broad transportation policy and technology perspective to the committee. RUSSELL D. SHAVER III is a senior policy analyst with RAND. He has worked on a wide array of topics, including transportation security and the future of the FAA and the national airspace system. Dr. Shaver helped the committee understand the strengths and weaknesses of existing models as they relate to predicting the future performance of the national airspace system. DAVID D. WOODS is a professor in the Institute for Ergonomics at the Ohio State University. He is an expert in cognitive engineering, investigating problems such as human error, how complex systems fail, how to make intelligent systems team players, and automation surprises in application areas such as space operations and automated flight decks. He has received awards for research on integrated pattern displays (Ely award for best paper in Human Factors, 1994), on cockpit automation (Laurel Award from Aviation

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Securing the Future of U.S. Air Transportation: A System in Peril Week and Space Technology in 1995), and on cognitive engineering (the Kraft Innovators award from the Human Factors and Ergonomic Society in 2002). He is a former president and fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomic Society and a fellow of the American Psychological Society and the American Psychological Association. He served on two other NRC committees. Dr. Woods’s expertise helped the committee address automation issues.