B
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

CORALE L. BRIERLEY, Chair, is a consultant with Brierley Consultancy LLC, which provides technical and business consultation to the mining and chemical industries and government agencies. Her research interests include the application of biotechnology to mine production and site remediation. Previously, Dr. Brierley worked as a chemical microbiologist at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, as chief of environmental process development for Newmont Mining Corporation, as general partner at Vistatech Partnership Ltd., and as the president of Advanced Mineral Technologies. She is a member of the Division Review Committee for the Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory and is also a member of the International Biohydrometallurgy Symposia and the Editorial Board for Hydrometallurgy. Dr. Brierley was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1999 and has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Technology for the Mining Industries and the Committee on Earth Resources. She is a member of the Society of Mining Engineers of American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers and the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America. Dr. Brierley holds a Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Texas at Dallas and an M.S. in chemistry from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro.



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Future Challenges for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Mineral Resources Program B Biographical Sketches of Committee Members CORALE L. BRIERLEY, Chair, is a consultant with Brierley Consultancy LLC, which provides technical and business consultation to the mining and chemical industries and government agencies. Her research interests include the application of biotechnology to mine production and site remediation. Previously, Dr. Brierley worked as a chemical microbiologist at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, as chief of environmental process development for Newmont Mining Corporation, as general partner at Vistatech Partnership Ltd., and as the president of Advanced Mineral Technologies. She is a member of the Division Review Committee for the Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory and is also a member of the International Biohydrometallurgy Symposia and the Editorial Board for Hydrometallurgy. Dr. Brierley was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1999 and has served on several National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Technology for the Mining Industries and the Committee on Earth Resources. She is a member of the Society of Mining Engineers of American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers and the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America. Dr. Brierley holds a Ph.D. in environmental sciences from the University of Texas at Dallas and an M.S. in chemistry from the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro.

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Future Challenges for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Mineral Resources Program GEORGE H. BRIMHALL is a professor of geology in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Berkeley, where he has taught and conducted research for nearly 25 years. Previously he taught in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University and worked as a project and underground mine geologist for the Anaconda Company. Dr. Brimhall’s research interests include digital field mapping, mining and exploration geology, ore deposit geology and geochemistry, and mineral resources issues. He currently serves on the California State Science Advisory Panel’s Commission on Teacher Credentialing. In addition, he has been active with both the Society of Economic Geologists and the Geological Society of America; he was associate editor of the Geological Society of America Bulletin from 1992 to 1995. Dr. Brimhall was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2001 and received the UC-Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award in 1999. He holds a Ph.D. in geology from the University of California, Berkeley. RODERICK G. EGGERT is a professor and the director of the Division of Economics and Business at the Colorado School of Mines. He also is the editor of Resources Policy, an international journal of mineral economics and policy. Dr. Eggert specializes in natural resources and environmental economics, especially as they relate to mineral policy, mineral markets, and mining and sustainable development. Dr. Eggert was president of the Mineral Economics and Management Society from 1996 to 1997. He was a member of the National Research Council’s Panel to Review the U.S. Geological Survey’s Mineral Resource Surveys Program Plan and a member of the Committee on Earth Resources. He has written extensively on minerals exploration, mining and the environment, and public policy toward the minerals sector. Dr. Eggert holds a Ph.D. in mineral economics and an M.S. in geochemistry and mineralogy from the Pennsylvania State University, and a B.A. in earth sciences from Dartmouth College. JAMES M. FRANKLIN is a consulting geologist with Franklin Geosciences Ltd., specializing in deposits of volcanogenic massive sulfide, gold, and platinum group elements and Precambrian metallogeny. He is also director of Patrician Consolidated Gold Mines Ltd., Kinloch Resources Ltd., Phoenix Matachewan Ltd., the Canadian Scientific Submersible Foundation, RJK Resources Ltd., and Project Neptune, which is

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Future Challenges for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Mineral Resources Program an international program to develop fiber-optic real-time monitoring of geological and environmental processes. Dr. Franklin is an adjunct professor at Queen’s University, Kingston, and Laurentian University, Sudbury. In 1996 he became a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and represents Canada’s geoscientists on the Royal Society’s Partnership Group for Science and Engineering. Dr. Franklin worked for the Earth Sciences Sector of the Geological Survey of Canada for 23 years, as chief geoscientist (1993-1998) and as a senior research scientist (1975-1998). He continues his research as a visiting research scientist and is coeditor of Exploration and Mining Geology. Dr. Franklin has received numerous awards from the Canadian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, the Geological Association of Canada, and the Society of Economic Geologists. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Western Ontario and an M.S. from Carleton University. RHEA GRAHAM is director of the Planning and Communications Program for the New Mexico Interstate Stream Commission, a sister agency of the Office of the State Engineer, where she leads the effort to develop the state’s first water plan, using a collaborative and public process. Previously, she was water resources manager for Pueblo of Sandia from 1997 to 2000, served as the nineteenth director of the U.S. Bureau of Mines from 1994 to 1996, and was director of the Mining and Minerals Division in New Mexico from 1991 to 1993. She is a registered engineering geologist and geologist in Oregon and is a certified professional geologist with the American Institute of Professional Geologists. She is a member of the National Research Council’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources. Ms. Graham holds an A.B. in geology from Bryn Mawr College and an M.A. in oceanography from Oregon State University. JESSICA ELZEA KOGEL is principal research clay mineralogist and group leader for Thiele Kaolin Company, a major producer of kaolin. She directs research for two research and development groups and manages corporate analytical services laboratories. Previously, Dr. Kogel was a senior research scientist and manager of the industrial minerals group of McCrone Research Associates, where she coordinated industrial minerals research, developed x-ray diffraction methods, and provided applied research and consulting services to the mining, paper, paint, pharmaceuticals, ceramics, plastics and petroleum industries. She has served as an associate editor for Clay and Clay Minerals and is senior

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Future Challenges for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Mineral Resources Program editor for the seventh edition of Industrial Minerals and Rocks. She is on the Board of Directors of the Society for Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration and was chair of the Industrial Minerals Division from 2001 to 2002. She is also president of the Clay Minerals Society and a member of other organizations, including the Mineralogical Society of America and the Georgia Geological Society. Dr. Kogel holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in geology from Indiana University and four patents in clay processing methods. MARK J. LOGSDON has been president and principal geochemist at Geochimica, Inc., since 1992 and specializes in hydrogeochemistry. His projects include hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical studies of acid mine drainage, planning mine closures, water-quality site investigations, and geochemical modeling. Previously, Mr. Logsdon was senior hydrogeochemist and vice president for Adrian Brown Consultants, where he conducted field and laboratory studies of contamination problems associated with tailing impoundments and acid mine drainage and reviewed major waste management projects for private clients and government agencies. Mr. Logsdon also worked as a project manager and hydrogeologist for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Division of Waste Management and as an economic geologist for the New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources. He is a member of several professional organizations, including the Association of Exploration Geochemists, the Geochemical Society, the Geological Society of America, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Mr. Logsdon is a Ph.D. candidate in hydrogeochemistry at the University of Waterloo and holds an M.S. in geology from the University of New Mexico. DREW A. MEYER is a construction materials group vice president at Vulcan Materials Company, the nation’s largest producer of construction aggregates. He coordinates marketing, marketing support services, marketing research, economic analysis and forecasting, and transportation sales and service. Mr. Meyer began his career at Vulcan Materials in 1966. He is currently the vice chairman at-large of the National Stone, Sand, and Gravel Association and is on the Board of Directors of the International Concrete and Aggregates Group. Mr. Meyer is a member of several professional and industry organizations, including the American Marketing Association, the National Association of Business Economists, and the Society of Mining, Metallurgy, Exploration, and the Min-

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Future Challenges for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Mineral Resources Program eral Information Institute. He has authored articles on the stone industry and made presentations on the extraction, processing, and consumption of magnetic metals from municipal solid waste. Mr. Meyer served in the U.S. Army from 1967 to 1970, where he attained the rank of captain and was awarded the Army Commendation Medal for Meritorious Service and the Bronze Star for Exceptionally Meritorious Service. He holds a B.S. and an M.S. in mineral economics from the Pennsylvania State University and has attended numerous seminars and short courses on marketing research. GLENN C. MILLER is a professor of environmental and resource sciences at the University of Nevada, Reno. He is also director of the graduate program in Environmental Sciences and Health at UNR. He has a B.S. in chemistry from the University of California, Santa Barbara, and a Ph.D. in agricultural and environmental chemistry (1977) from the University of California at Davis. Following graduate studies, Dr. Miller spent a year of postdoctoral study at the Environmental Protection Agency’s Environmental Research Laboratory in Athens, Georgia. His current areas of research include precious metals pit water quality, closure of precious metals heaps, and acid mine remediation using anaerobic sulfate-reducing systems. He also is working on the development of techniques to determine gas-phase sunlight photolysis rates of medium-weight organics and emission of organic compounds from two-stroke engines into lakes. In addition, Dr. Miller actively participates in the development of mining reclamation legislation for Nevada and on regulations mandated by that legislation. He is presently on the Board of Directors of the Mineral Policy Center, the Center for Science in Public Participation, Great Basin Mine Watch, and Environmental Law Alliance Worldwide. ANTHONY J. NALDRETT is university professor emeritus with the University of Toronto, where he held the Norman Keevil Chair in Ore Genesis from 1997 to 1998 and taught from 1967 until 1998. His main research interests are magmatic sulfide ores—the tectonic settings in which they occur, the petrology of associated rocks, and controls on their composition (reaction between sulfide and silicate melts, fractional crystallization of sulfide melts, the role of hydrothermal fluids). He is noted particularly for his focus on the use of the platinum group elements in understanding the origin of magmatic sulfide deposits. In addition to his

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Future Challenges for the U.S. Geological Survey’s Mineral Resources Program research, he has served as consultant to many companies, including Chevron, Falconbridge Ltd., MRDI, Western Mining Corporation, BHP, Diamond Fields Resources (during their involvement with Voisey’s Bay), COMINCO American, Donner Minerals, and Anzex Resources Ltd. Dr. Naldrett holds a Ph.D. from Queen’s University, an M.A. from the University of Cambridge, and an M.S. from Queen’s University. In addition, he received D.Sc. (honoris causa) awards from both Laurentian University and the University of Pretoria in 2000 and 2001, respectively. He is president of the International Mineralogical Association, a trustee of the Society of Economic Geologists Foundation, and president of the Geological Society of America. NRC Staff TAMARA L. DICKINSON, study director, is a senior program officer with the National Research Council’s Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, responsible for managing the earth resources activities of the Board. She was awarded the National Academies 2002 Distinguished Service Award. She has served as program director for the Petrology and Geochemistry Program in the Division of Earth Sciences at the National Science Foundation. She has also served as discipline scientist for the Planetary Materials and Geochemistry Program at National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters. As a postdoctoral fellow at the NASA Johnson Space Center, she conducted experiments on the origin and evolution of lunar rocks and highly reduced igneous meteorites. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.S. in geology from the University of New Mexico and a B.A. in geology from the University of Northern Iowa.