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F Biographies of Board Members MEMBERS AT LARGE Linda Capuano (Chair) is vice president, Technology Strategy, Honeywell, with overall customer and product responsibility. Her past experience includes research and development (R&D) management with responsibility for selecting and managing R&D programs and new business opportunities in a variety of technologies and experience in high-level review of government research programs. She has previously held positions at Conductus and IBM Corporation. She served on the Department of Energy (DOE) Task Force on Alternative Futures for the DOE National Laboratories (the "Galvin Task Force"~. David C. Bonner is vice president for R&D and chief technology officer at Cabot Corporation. His previous positions include global director of Rohm and Haas Company's Polymer Technology Center; senior vice president for technology and engineering, Westlake Group; senior vice president and chief technical officer, Premix; vice president for research and development, B.F. Goodrich; and associate professor of chemical engineering at Texas A&M University. Dr. Bonner has published more than 50 peer-reviewed articles and holds a Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. He served as a member of the National Research Council's Committee on the Industrial Environment Performance Metrics and was a member of the Board on Chemical Sciences and Technol- ogy. Herwig Kogelnik is adjunct vice president for photonics research at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Tech- nologies. He is known for his pioneering work on lasers, holography, and optical guided-wave devices and for his leadership of optical communications research. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. Mark B. Myers retired from the Xerox Corporation at the beginning of 2000, after a 36-year career in its research and development organizations. He was the senior vice president in charge of corporate research, advanced development, systems architecture, and corporate engineering from 1992 to 2000. 303

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304 APPENDIX F His responsibilities included the corporate research centers, such as Palo Alto Research Center in Palo Alto, California. During this period, he was also a member of the senior management committee in charge of the strategic direction setting of the company. Currently, he is Visiting Executive Professor in the Management Department at the Wharton Business School, the University of Pennsylvania, where his research interests include identifying emerging markets and technologies to enable growth in new and existing companies with special emphases on technology identification and selection, product development, and technology competencies. He holds a bachelor's degree from Earlham College and a doctorate from Pennsylvania State University. He serves on the NRC's Science, Technology, and Economic Policy Board and currently co-chairs the NRC study of Intellectual Property in the Knowl- edge Based Economy. Thomas A. Saponas is a senior vice president and chief technology officer of Agilent Technologies as well as director of Agilent Laboratories. His responsibilities include developing the company's long- term technology strategy and overseeing the alignment of the company's objectives with its centralized R&D activities. He has more than 27 years of experience in electrical engineering, refined over the course of his career with Hewlett-Packard Company, where he began in 1972 as a design engineer in the company's Automatic Measurement Division and went on to become vice president and general man- ager of the Electronic Instruments Group. In 1986, he was selected to serve as a White House fellow and served as special assistant to the Secretary of the Navy for a year on leave from Hewlett-Packard. He earned a B.S. in electrical engineering and computer science and an M.S. in electrical engineering, both from the University of Colorado. Eugene Sevin is an independent consultant. His research interests are in nuclear and conventional weapons effects, hardened facility design, and computational structural mechanics. He formerly served with the U.S. Department of Defense as deputy director, space and missiles systems, and with the defense nuclear agency as assistant to the deputy director (science and technology) for experimental research. Other positions that Dr. Sevin has held include professor of mechanical engineering at the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology (IIT), and head, mechanical engineering at Ben Gurion Univer- sity of the Negev, Israel. He earned a B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from IIT, an M.S. degree from the California Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. in applied mechanics from IIT. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. He is currently a member of the NRC Committee on Army S&T for Homeland Defense and has served on the NRC Committee on Oversight and Assessment of Blast-effects and Related Research. EX OFFICIO MEMBERS Panel for Electronics and Electrical Engineering Constance ,l. Chang-Hasnain (Chair) is a professor of electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research interests are in novel semiconductor optoelectronic device and material technologies for optical communications and in ultrahigh-capacity optical networks and systems enabled by novel components. Before coming to Berkeley in 1992, she spent 5 years at Bellcore. In 1997 she founded BANDWIDTH9, Inc.; she is currently its chief technical officer. She received a B.S. from the University of California, Davis, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, all in electrical engineering. She is a fellow of the Institute of Electrical and

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APPENDIX F 305 Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and of the Optical Society of America and has been a Packard fellow, Sloan fellow, and National Young Investigator. Robert R. Doering (Vice Chair) is a senior fellow in Silicon Technology Development at Texas Instruments (TI). Currently, his primary area of responsibility at TI, where he has been since 1980, is technology strategy. His previous positions at TI include those of manager of future-factory strategy, director of scaled-technology integration, and director of the Microelectronics Manufacturing Science and Technology Program. He received a B.S. degree in physics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Ph.D. in physics from Michigan State University. He is co-chair of the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors and serves on the Corporate Associates Advisory Committee of the American Institute of Physics. He is a senior member of IEEE. Panel for Manufacturing Engineering Marvin F. DeVries (Chair) is a professor of mechanical engineering, University of Wisconsin at Madison. He is an expert on metal-cutting processes and computer-integrated manufacturing. His cur- rent research focuses on material removal processes and computer-aided manufacturing. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Institute of Production Engineers, and the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. Richard A. Curless (Vice Chair) is vice president of Product and Technology Development for UNOVA Manufacturing Technologies, located in Cincinnati, Ohio. His responsibilities include technology development and transfer, technical support services, and product development. He has 35 years of experience in the machine tool industry. His previous positions include chief engineer, manager of R&D projects, and manager of advanced technology at Cincinnati Milacron. He currently serves on various technical advisory boards and committees, including TechSolve Board of Directors, the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences' Strategic Technical Board, and the Association for Manufacturing Technol- ogy's Technology Issues Committee. Panel for Chemical Science and Technology James W. Serum (Chair) is founder of SciTek Ventures, a consulting company that works with early- stage technology companies. Before founding SciTek in early 2002, he was executive vice president and chief operating officer of Viaken Systems, Inc., a hosted informatics solutions provider for the life sciences, providing solutions for biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and agricultural R&D companies. Before helping to found Viaken in 1999, he spent 26 years at Hewlett-Packard (HP), where he worked on mass spectrometry instrumentation. In 1992, Dr. Serum was named general manager for mass spectrometry, infrared, and protein chemical systems, and in 1994 he founded HP's Bioscience Products business before returning to the East Coast as a senior scientist and chair of the HP Pharmaceutical Business Council. He received a B.A. in chemistry from Hope College and a Ph.D. degree in organic chemistry from the University of Colorado. Alan Campion (Vice Chair) is Dow Chemical Company Professor and University Distinguished Teach- ing Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry of the University of Texas, Austin. His research interests lie in the general area of surface physics and chemistry, with a particular focus on the

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306 APPENDIX F spectroscopy of molecules adsorbed on single crystal surfaces. His laboratory is perhaps best known for its pioneering work in surface Raman spectroscopy. Current work is focused on developing a mechanis- tic understanding of surface-enhanced Raman scattering, on single-molecule Raman spectroscopy, and on the development of Raman near-field scanning optical microscopy. Professor Campion received the B.A. in chemistry from New College (Florida) and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of California, Los Angeles, and he was a National Science Foundation National Needs Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California, Berkeley. He has been an Alfred P. Sloan Fellow, Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar, and Guggenheim Fellow, and he was awarded the Coblentz Memorial Prize in Molecular Spectroscopy in 1987. Panel for Physics Duncan T. Moore (Chair) is the Rudolf and Hilda Kingslake Professor of Optical Engineering and a professor of biomedical engineering at the University of Rochester. He is also a special assistant to the university president and executive director of the University, Industry and Government Partnership for Advanced Photonics. From the fall of 1997 to December 2000, Dr. Moore served in the position of associate director for technology in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP). In this position, he worked on technology policy, including that related to the Next Generation Internet, Clean Car Initiative, technology for elders, crime technologies, and NASA. From January through May 2001, Dr. Moore served as special adviser to the acting director of OSTP. Dr. Moore has extensive experience in the academic, research, business, and governmental areas of science and technology. He Is an expert in gradient-index optics, computer-aided design, and the manufacture of optical systems. Dr. Moore is the founder and former president of Gradient Lens Corporation of Rochester, New York, a company that manufacturers the high-quality, low-cost Hawkeye horoscope. In 1996, Dr. Moore served as president of the Optical Society of America (OSA). From January 2001 to the present, he has served as senior science advisor at OSA. In 1999, he received the National Engineering Award of the American Association of Engineering Societies. He was the recipient of the 2001 OSA Leadership Award. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. . . Robert L. Byer (Vice Chair) is a professor of applied physics and the director of the Hansen Experi- mental Physics Laboratory at Stanford University. He is recognized for his contributions to the science, engineering, and art of solid-state lasers, optical parametric oscillators, and nonlinear optics. His current research interests include laser sources and interferometer configurations for gravitational wave detec- tion, global remote sensing using tunable solid-state lasers, laser electron acceleration, and studies of ultrafast laser interaction with matter. He has a B.A. in physics from the University of California, Berkeley and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in applied physics from Stanford University. He is a fellow of OSA, IEEE, American Physical Society, and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and of the National Academy of Engineering. He has served as president of OSA and of the IEEE Lasers and Electro-optics Society. Panel for Materials Science and Engineering David W. Johnson, ,Ir. (Chair) is the retired director of the Applied Materials Research Department at Agere Systems. His expertise is in ceramic materials development and processing, specifically, powder preparation methods, magnetic devices, and optical fiber glasses. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a past president of the American Ceramic Society.

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APPENDIX F 307 Katharine G. Frase (Vice Chair) is director of World Wide Packaging Development for the IBM Microelectronics Division. She is responsible for all process development and design/modeling method- ology for organic and ceramic chip packaging for IBM. Her research interests include mechanical properties/structural interactions in composites, high-temperature superconductors, solid electrolytes (fast ionic conductors), ceramic powder synthetic methods, and ceramic packaging. She received an A.B. in chemistry from Bryn Mawr College and a Ph.D. in materials science and engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. She chaired an IBMINRC workshop on lead solder reduction actions and in 1998 served as the packaging assurance manager for IBM worldwide. Panel for Building and Fire Research Robert A. Altenkirch (Chair) is president of the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT). He is an expert in flame spreading, combustion at reduced gravity, and heat and mass transfer processes in combustion. Before coming to NJIT, he was vice president for research at Mississippi State University from 1998 to 2002, and before that he served in academic and administrative positions at Washington State University, Mississippi State University, and the University of Kentucky. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Ross B. Corotis (Vice Chair) is Denver Business Challenge Professor, Department of Civil, Environ- mental, and Architectural Engineering, at the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has a background in structural mechanics and stochastic vibrations, and his primary research interests are in the applica- tion of probabilistic concepts to civil engineering problems, including wind characteristics and mesos- cale storm modeling. He is a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers and a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Panel for Information Technology Albert M. Erisman (Chair) is the codirector of the Institute for Business, Technology, and Ethics. He recently retired from the Boeing Company, where he was director of mathematics and computing technology and a Boeing senior technical fellow. At Boeing, he led a staff of 250 computer scientists, mathematicians, statisticians, and engineers who provided leadership for Boeing in all areas of informa- tion technology and mathematics. He holds a B.S. in mathematics from Northern Illinois University and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Iowa State University. His own research has been in mathematical algorithms, mathematical software, and the applications of these to the improvement of Boeing engineering and analysis codes. His recent responsibilities include addressing the broader area of the application of advanced information technology to the transformation of business processes. His management focus has included the linking of research and development with business requirements, and the delivery of technology for business benefit. He served as a member of the National Research Council's Committee on Information Technology Research in a Competitive World. C. William Gear (Vice Chair) is president emeritus of the NEC Research Institute. Prior to joining NEC, he was head of the Department of Computer Science and professor of computer science and applied mathematics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research expertise is in numerical analysis and computational software. He received a B.A. and an M.A. in mathematics from Cambridge and an M.S. and Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts

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308 APPENDIX F and Sciences, the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and the Association for Computing Machinery. He served as president of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics. He is past chair of the NRC Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board and served on the NRC Committee on Future Environments for the National Institute of Standards and Technology.

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