Appendix D
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE

THOMAS BOAT, M.D. (Chair), is director of the Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and Professor and chair in the department of pediatrics within the University of Cincinnati. He has served on the certification committee of the American Board of Medical Specialties (1998–2000), as chair for a task force on the future of pediatric education (1996–1999), and as president for the American Pediatric Society (1999–2000). Dr. Boat is a pediatric pulmonologist by training and has a research background in the molecular pathophysiology of lung diseases, especially cystic fibrosis. His current interests and involvements are in the areas of (1) redesign of graduate medical education; (2) improvements in the delivery of child health care, including the creation of hospital–community partnerships; and (3) management of academic health centers, with emphasis on the application of business approaches to maximize resource utilization for program development and maintenance.

BARBARA ATKINSON, M.D., is executive dean and vice chancellor for clinical affairs at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. She was previously professor, chair, and residency program director in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Kansas in Kansas City, and prior to that had served as Annenberg Dean of MCP Hahnemann School of Medicine (1996–1999). She is a trustee (1991–present) and past president (1998) of the American Board of Pathology. Dr. Atkinson was previously a member of the Pathology Residency Review Committee (1992–1996) of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Her research has been in the



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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Appendix D Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE THOMAS BOAT, M.D. (Chair), is director of the Children’s Hospital Research Foundation and Professor and chair in the department of pediatrics within the University of Cincinnati. He has served on the certification committee of the American Board of Medical Specialties (1998–2000), as chair for a task force on the future of pediatric education (1996–1999), and as president for the American Pediatric Society (1999–2000). Dr. Boat is a pediatric pulmonologist by training and has a research background in the molecular pathophysiology of lung diseases, especially cystic fibrosis. His current interests and involvements are in the areas of (1) redesign of graduate medical education; (2) improvements in the delivery of child health care, including the creation of hospital–community partnerships; and (3) management of academic health centers, with emphasis on the application of business approaches to maximize resource utilization for program development and maintenance. BARBARA ATKINSON, M.D., is executive dean and vice chancellor for clinical affairs at the University of Kansas School of Medicine. She was previously professor, chair, and residency program director in the Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine at the University of Kansas in Kansas City, and prior to that had served as Annenberg Dean of MCP Hahnemann School of Medicine (1996–1999). She is a trustee (1991–present) and past president (1998) of the American Board of Pathology. Dr. Atkinson was previously a member of the Pathology Residency Review Committee (1992–1996) of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Her research has been in the

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform identification and characterization of tumor antigens in cells and tissues and in the development of techniques to recognize tumors and tumor types. Dr. Atkinson has edited several books in cytopathology and gynecologic pathology, including one of the classic books in the discipline, the Atlas of Cytopathology, published in 1992, and the Atlas of Difficult Diagnosis in Cytopathology, published in 1998 by Saunders. She recently served on an Association of American Medical Colleges Committee on Increasing Women’s Leadership in Academic Medicine. BENJAMIN S. BUNNEY, M.D., is Charles B. G. Murphy Professor and chair of the department of psychiatry, professor of pharmacology, and professor of neurobiology at the Yale Medical School. Dr. Bunney is one of the world’s leading experts on the brain’s dopamine systems, whose malfunctioning has been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and neurological movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease. He is a past president of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology and the recipient of its highest research award, the Daniel H. Efron Award. He was also the first recipient of the Lieber Prize for outstanding achievement in research on mental illness from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression. Dr. Bunney serves on numerous editorial boards and pharmaceutical company scientific advisory boards, and is a member of the Institute of Medicine. GABRIELLE A. CARLSON, M.D., has been professor of psychiatry and pediatrics and director of the division of child and adolescent psychiatry at the State University of New York at Stony Brook since 1985. Dr. Carlson specializes in childhood psychopathology and psychopharmacology in general, and in the subjects of childhood and adolescent depression and bipolar disorder more specifically. She has written more than 150 papers and chapters on those subjects and has coauthored two books: Affective Disorders in Childhood Adolescence (Spectrum Publications) and Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents (W. B. Saunders). Her research interests include the phenomenology and long-term follow-up of young people with bipolar disorder, and the relationship of behavior disorders and mood disorders. Her most recent grants have focused on those questions. Dr. Carlson has been named among the Best Doctors in America and Good Housekeeping’s Best Mental Health Experts. She has served on several editorial boards (Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, American Journal of Psychiatry, Journal of

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform Affective Disorders, Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology) and numerous professional committees. JAMES J. HUDZIAK, M.D., is an associate professor of psychiatry and medicine and director of child psychiatry in the department of psychiatry at the University of Vermont. He also serves as director of the division of behavioral genetics and research director of pediatric psychopharmacology. In addition, he has an adjunct appointment as associate professor of psychiatry at Dartmouth Medical School. His research efforts have involved the study of genetic factors influencing social behaviors, attention, and aggression. His funded research has included phenotypic, endophenotypic, and molecular genetic and pharmacologic studies of child psychopathology. Dr. Hudziak has published numerous peer-reviewed articles, reviews articles for a number of journals, and reviews grants for the National Institute of Mental Health as well as the Dutch National and Scottish National Review Boards. He also has been heavily involved in medical student and residency education in psychiatry and genetics. He has served on two Josiah Macy Foundation studies on the importance of genetics and on psychiatry education in medicine. He is a member of a number of professional organizations, such as the American Psychiatric Association, the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the Behavioral Genetics Association, the International Society of Psychiatric Genetics, and the Society of Professors in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. DEAN KILPATRICK, Ph.D., is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He received a Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Georgia in 1970 and has been a faculty member at the Medical University since receiving his degree. Throughout his career, Dr. Kilpatrick has been an active researcher and has received numerous peer-reviewed extramural research grants from a host of federal agencies. For the past 14 years, he has been principal investigator on a National Institute of Mental Health–funded research-training grant that provides scientist-practitioner research training to three predoctoral and three postdoctoral students each year. He is also editor of the Journal of Traumatic Stress, a multidisciplinary international journal. For the past 20 years, Dr. Kilpatrick has served as director or codirector of the Charleston Consortium Clinical Psychology Internship Program. Throughout his career, he has been involved in a variety of educational activities with medical students and psychiatry residents. Dr. Kilpatrick

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform also has experience in the area of public policy. He has provided invited testimony about public policy issues to committees of the United States House and Senate, state legislatures, and federal courts. He has also served on various committees tasked with making research-based policy recommendations to federal agencies. WILLIAM LAWSON, M.D., is currently professor and chairman of the department of psychiatry at Howard University School of Medicine. He is also chair of the section of psychiatry and behavioral sciences of the National Medical Association. He is past president of the Black Psychiatrists of America. Dr. Lawson has produced more than 85 publications involving severe mental illness and its relationship to psychopharmacology, substance abuse, and racial and ethnic issues. He has a long-standing concern with ethnic disparities in mental health treatment and has been an outspoken advocate for access to services among the severely mentally ill. He currently is a member of the Scientific Advisory Committee, National Depression and Manic Depressive Society, and on the boards of the DC Mental Health Association and DC Alliance for the Mentally Ill. He is currently directing a $6.5 million contract with the National Institute of Mental Health intramural program to conduct research on mood and anxiety disorders among African Americans and other ethnic minorities. VIRGINIA MAN-YEE LEE, Ph.D., is professor of pathology and laboratory medicine and director of the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, and is the first recipient of the John H. Ware III Chair for Alzheimer’s Disease Research. Dr. Lee’s research focuses on the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and related neurodegenerative disorders of aging. Since 1970, she has authored over 400 papers, including more than 200 papers on Alzheimer’s disease, pulmonary disease, and other age-related neurodegenerative disorders. She was elected a councilor in the Society for Neuroscience (2001) and continues to serve on a number of grant review committees, including NIH study sections and foundation review committees, such as that of the Alzheimer’s Association. JEROME POSNER, M.D., is currently George C. Cotzias Chair of Neuro-Oncology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and an American Cancer Society research professor. He was chair of the department of neurology at Sloan-Kettering from 1975 to 1997. His current research is on the biology of paraneoplastic syndromes—

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform disorders of an organ or tissue caused by cancer, but not a direct effect of the tumor or a metastasis to the involved organ. DAVID REISS, M.D., is Vivian Gill Distinguished Professor and director of the division of research in the department of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at The George Washington University. He has been at The George Washington University since 1974. Between 1966 and 1974, he served in various positions in the adult psychiatry branch at the National Institute of Mental Health including section chief and acting branch chief. Dr. Reiss’ current research focuses on mechanisms of gene–environment interplay in children, adolescents, and adults. He directs a National Institute of Mental Health–supported training grant that includes programs for attracting psychiatric residents into research and has mentored numerous K awards for early career research psychiatrists. Dr. Reiss has received many research awards, including a National Institute of Mental Health merit award; this year he will receive the Adolf Meyer Award from the American Psychiatric Association. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Board of Neurosciences and Behavioral Health. MICHELLE RIBA, M.D, M.S., is clinical professor and associate chair for education and academic affairs in the department of psychiatry, University of Michigan Health System, and director of the psychooncology program at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. Dr. Riba has served as vice president, secretary, and trustee at large for the American Psychiatric Association and in May 2003 became president-elect. She is past president of the American Association of Directors of Psychiatric Residency Training and the Association for Academic Psychiatry. Dr. Riba is a fellow in the Class of 2002–2003 Hedwig van Ameringen Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine Program for Women. She has coedited 13 editions of The American Psychiatric Press Review of Psychiatry series. She has also coedited Psychopharmacology and Psychotherapy: A Collaborative Approach; Primary Care Psychiatry; and The Doctor-Patient Relationship in Pharmacotherapy: Improving Treatment Effectiveness. Dr. Riba is the author or coauthor of more than 100 scientific articles, chapters, and scientific abstracts. Her research interests are in psycho-oncology and the integration of psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. RICHARD SCHEFFLER, Ph.D., is distinguished professor of health economics and public policy at the University of California, Berkeley, and holds the chair in healthcare markets and consumer welfare endowed

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform by the Office of the Attorney General for the State of California. He is director of the Petris Center. At Berkeley, he serves as codirector of the Scholars in Health Policy Research Program, funded by The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. He is founding codirector of the National Institute of Mental Health pre- and postdoctoral training programs. He also codirects the National Institutes of Health–Fogarty Mental Health and Policy Research Training for Czech Post Doctoral Scholars program; the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality pre- and postdoctoral training program; and the Edmund S. Muskie Fellowship Program. He served as president and program chair of the International Health Economics Association (iHEA) Fourth World Congress in San Francisco, June 2003. His research is on health care markets, health insurance, the health workforce, mental health economics, and international health system reforms in Western and Eastern Europe. He is the recipient of a senior scientist award from National Institute of Mental Health for studying mental health. Professor Scheffler has been a Fulbright Scholar, a Rockefeller Scholar, and a Scholar in Residence at the Institute of Medicine–National Academy of Sciences. He has published more than 125 papers and edited and written six books. His forthcoming book (University of California Press) is on the future of the health workforce. JOEL YAGER, M.D., is professor of psychiatry and vice chair for education at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine and is professor of psychiatry emeritus at the University of California at Los Angeles. His research and scholarly work have focused on eating disorders, primary care aspects of psychiatry, family therapy, consultation–liaison psychiatry, stress, professional development and education in psychiatry and medicine, the development of practice guidelines, and, most recently, mental health services research. Dr. Yager has authored or coauthored more than 200 professional articles and book chapters, and has edited and coedited seven books, including Teaching Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, The Future of Psychiatry as a Medical Specialty, and Special Problems in the Management of Eating Disorders. IOM STAFF MICHAEL T. ABRAMS, M.P.H., is program officer with the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health of the Institute of Medicine. He has served as study director for the present work and as program officer on a

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform study of spinal cord injury research planning. He earned his masters of public health degree from The Johns Hopkins University (2000), where he focused his studies on childhood mental health disorders. From 1997 to 2001, he served as a junior faculty member in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. From 1994 to 2001, he was involved in and managed structural and functional neuroimaging experiments aimed at the elucidation of neuropathologies that underlie various genetic disorders affecting learning and language in children. From 1990 to 1994, he worked as a research assistant on a behavioral genetics investigation that focused on fragile X and Turner syndromes. He has authored or coauthored 25 peer-reviewed publications. KATHLEEN M. PATCHAN is research assistant with the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health. She has served in that capacity for the present study, and for a study on spinal cord injury research planning. She previously worked at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and the Congressional Research Service, focusing on Medicaid, the State Children’s Health Insurance Program, and employer-sponsored health insurance. Ms. Patchan received bachelors degrees in cell and molecular biology and in history from the University of Maryland at College Park. ANDREW M. POPE, Ph.D., is acting director of the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health and director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine. With expertise in physiology and biochemistry, he focuses his work primarily on environmental and occupational influences on human health. Dr. Pope’s previous research activities addressed the neuroendocrine and reproductive effects of various environmental substances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and since 1989 at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed the preparation of numerous reports on topics that include injury control, disability prevention, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the enhancement of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. Most recently, Dr. Pope directed studies on National Institutes of Health priority-setting processes, fluid resuscitation practices in combat casualties, and organ procurement and transplantation.

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Research Training in Psychiatry Residency: Strategies for Reform