F
Biographies

Paul D. Cleary, Ph.D. (Chair), is Professor of Health Care Policy in the Department of Health Care Policy at the Harvard Medical School. His research interests include developing better methods for using patient reports about their care and health status to evaluate the quality of medical care and studying the relationships between clinician and organizational characteristics and the quality of medical care. He has published over 200 research articles on these topics. Dr. Cleary’s current research includes a study of how organizational characteristics affect the costs and quality of care for persons with AIDS and a national evaluation of a continuous quality-improvement initiative in clinics providing care to HIV-infected individuals. He also is Principal Investigator of one of the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Studies (CAHPS) funded by the Agency for Health Research and Quality to develop survey protocols for collecting information from consumers regarding their health plans and services. Dr. Cleary is a member of the Institute of Medicine and previously served as a member of the Committee on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Dr. Cleary received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin.

Ronald Bayer, Ph.D., is Professor in the Division of Sociomedical Sciences at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. Since 1982, he has been involved in the study of the ethical and policy dimensions of the AIDS epidemic. He served on the National Research Council’s Committee on the Social Impact of AIDS and more re-



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement



Below are the first 10 and last 10 pages of uncorrected machine-read text (when available) of this chapter, followed by the top 30 algorithmically extracted key phrases from the chapter as a whole.
Intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text on the opening pages of each chapter. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Do not use for reproduction, copying, pasting, or reading; exclusively for search engines.

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act F Biographies Paul D. Cleary, Ph.D. (Chair), is Professor of Health Care Policy in the Department of Health Care Policy at the Harvard Medical School. His research interests include developing better methods for using patient reports about their care and health status to evaluate the quality of medical care and studying the relationships between clinician and organizational characteristics and the quality of medical care. He has published over 200 research articles on these topics. Dr. Cleary’s current research includes a study of how organizational characteristics affect the costs and quality of care for persons with AIDS and a national evaluation of a continuous quality-improvement initiative in clinics providing care to HIV-infected individuals. He also is Principal Investigator of one of the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Studies (CAHPS) funded by the Agency for Health Research and Quality to develop survey protocols for collecting information from consumers regarding their health plans and services. Dr. Cleary is a member of the Institute of Medicine and previously served as a member of the Committee on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Dr. Cleary received his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in sociology from the University of Wisconsin. Ronald Bayer, Ph.D., is Professor in the Division of Sociomedical Sciences at the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University. Since 1982, he has been involved in the study of the ethical and policy dimensions of the AIDS epidemic. He served on the National Research Council’s Committee on the Social Impact of AIDS and more re-

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act cently, the Committee on the Elimination of Tuberculosis in the United States and on the Committee on Immunization Safety Review. He is author of numerous articles on ethical issues posed by AIDS and tuberculosis, including Private Acts, Social Consequences: AIDS and the Politics of Public Health, and Blood Feuds: AIDS, Blood, and the Politics of Medical Disaster. His most recent co-authored book is AIDS Doctors: Voices from the Epidemic. Dr. Bayer received his Ph.D. in political sciences from the University of Chicago. Eric Bing, M.D., Ph.D., M.P.H., is the Director of the Center for AIDS Research, Education and Services at Drew University of Medicine and Sciences (Drew CARES), the Director of the Drew Collaborative Alcohol Research Center, and the co-director of the UCLA Center for HIV Identification, Prevention and Treatment Services (CHIPTS). Dr. Bing is a psychiatrist and epidemiologist with extensive expertise in HIV disease. Dr. Bing received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School and his Ph.D. in Epidemiology from UCLA. Following his training in psychiatry, he completed 6 years of training in health services research, initially as a Robert Woods Johnson Clinical Scholar and then as a Scholar in the UCLA Faculty Scholars Program. Dr. Bing’s research primarily focuses on developing and evaluating interventions to improve health care and health outcomes for disadvantaged populations, particularly those affected by HIV, mental illness, and/or alcohol and drug problems. In addition to Dr. Bing’s research programs, he also directs an HIV social services center, which has programs in mental health, case management, treatment education, and peer support. Samuel A. Bozzette, M.D., Ph.D., an internist and infectious diseases physician, is Professor of Medicine at the University of California San Diego, Chief of the Health Services Research Section at the VA San Diego, and a Senior Natural Scientist at RAND Health. Dr. Bozzette, an author of over 125 scientific publications and reports, has worked extensively in clinical trials of new drug treatments and in bringing comprehensive outcome assessment into trials. He now works on several facets of clinical epidemiology, medical care, outcomes, quality measurement and improvement, and cost. He is a Principal Investigator for the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study at RAND, and directs both the Center for Research in Patient-Oriented Care at the VA San Diego and the VA’s national Quality Enhancement Research Initiative (QUERI) for HIV/AIDS. He holds degrees from Georgetown University (B.S.), the University of Rochester (M.D.), and the RAND Graduate School of Policy Studies (M.Phil., Ph.D.; Policy Analysis).

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act David D. Celentano, Sc.D., M.H.S., is Professor and Director of the Infectious Diseases Program in the Department of Epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. He previously served as Professor and Head of the Division of Behavioral Sciences and Health Education at Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health. His research interests include psychosocial and behavioral factors in HIV/ AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections; reproductive health and epidemiology; cancer control and community epidemiology; and alcohol and drug epidemiology. Dr. Celentano served on the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Prevention and Control of Sexually Transmitted Diseases. He received both M.H.S. and Sc.D. from Johns Hopkins University. Victor De Gruttola, S.M., Sc.D., is a Professor of Biostatistics at Harvard School of Public Health. His research activities focus on developments of statistical methods required for appropriate public health response to the AIDS epidemic. His current research focuses on developing new statistical methods for clinical research on treatments for HIV infection, especially with regard to the causes and consequences of resistance to antiretroviral drugs. Since 1996, he has served as the Director of the Statistical and Data Analysis Center (SDAC) of the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group; he also serves on the Antiviral Drugs Advisory Committee of the FDA. Prior to serving as Director of SDAC, Dr. De Gruttola worked on projections of AIDS incidence using data from the New York City Health Department. A special focus of this work was estimation of the risk of AIDS that children of HIV-infected mothers experienced in the first 10 years of life, prior to the development of potent antiretroviral drugs. Dr. De Gruttola received his Sc.D. from Harvard University. Carlos del Rio, M.D., is Professor of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine and Chief of the Medical Service, Grady Memorial Hospital. Dr. del Rio is a native of Mexico where he attended medical school at Universidad La Salle. He did his Internal Medicine and Infectious Diseases residencies at Emory University. In 1989, he returned to Mexico where he was Executive Director of the National AIDS Council of Mexico (CONASIDA, the federal agency of the Mexican government responsible for AIDS policy throughout Mexico). His research interests include opportunistic infections in HIV and other immune deficiencies; epidemiology and transmission of HIV and other STDs; early diagnosis of HIV and access to care and compliance with antiretrovirals; impact of HIV in developing countries; and the optimal use of antiretrovirals in limited resource settings.

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act Aida Giachello, Ph.D., is currently an Associate Professor at Jane Addams College of Social Work at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is also Director of the Midwest Latino Health Research, Training, and Policy Center, where she has been conducting outcomes research on health disparities and has been training new minority investigators on health research, following a participatory research and community empowerment model. While working at the University of Chicago’s Center for Health Administration Studies in 1983, she began her work on Latino health research focusing on issues of financial, institutional, and cultural barriers in accessing health and medical care. Her research agenda focuses on issues of efficiency and quality of care related to chronic conditions including HIV, asthma, diabetes, cancer, hypertension, and maternal child health. She has a Master’s degree in Social Services Administration from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. in Medical Sociology from the University of Chicago with a specialty in health and ethnicity. William L. Holzemer, R.N., Ph.D., F.A.A.N., is Professor and Associate Dean of International Programs in the Department of Community Health Systems at UCSF School of Nursing; prior to this, he served as Department Chair, CHS (1995–2001), and Associate Dean for Research (1990–1995). Dr. Holzemer is also the Director of the International Center for HIV/AIDS Research and Clinical Training in Nursing. His program of research has examined quality of nursing education, quality of nursing care, outcomes research, variation in practice, self-care symptom management, and quality of life, with special emphasis on people living with HIV infection. He has had continuous extramural funding as Principal Investigator or Co-Principal Investigator over the past 20 years. He recently completed 6 years as a chartered member and Chair of a National Institutes of Health study section. Dr. Holzemer has published more than 100 refereed databased research articles, edited 6 books, and authored 13 book chapters. His current work is focusing upon adherence, symptom management, HIV/AIDS stigma, and quality of life. Dr. Holzemer is a member of the Institute of Medicine, Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, and a member of the Japan Academy of Nursing. He is a former Fulbright Scholar (Egypt), a Project HOPE Fellow (USA-Mexico Boarder), and is a Visiting Professor at St. Luke’s College of Nursing, Tokyo, Japan. He has served as an external adviser in nursing science at the University of Botswana, School of Education, University of Tokyo, School of Medicine, and many universities throughout the United States. Sandral Hullett, M.D., M.P.H., is acting CEO of Jefferson Health System in Birmingham, Alabama. She was formerly the Executive Director of Family HealthCare of Alabama, a not-for-profit community health center

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act serving 20 rural counties throughout Alabama. Her interests include rural health care and health care planning and delivery to the underserved, underinsured, and poor. She was awarded the University of Alabama School of Public Health’s first Public Health Hero Award for her work providing compassionate care to people living in Alabama’s rural, impoverished Black Belt communities. Dr. Hullett is a member of the Institute of Medicine and has served on several IOM committees including the Committee on the Changing Market, Managed Care, and the Future Viability of Safety Net Providers. Dr. Hullett received her M.D. from the Medical College of Pennsylvania and her M.P.H from the University of Alabama. Wendy K. Mariner, J.D., LL.M., M.P.H., is a Professor of Health Law at Boston University Schools of Public Health, Law, and Medicine. She has been a member of the AIDS Program Advisory Committee for the National Institutes of Health, the Executive Board of the American Public Health Association, and the Massachusetts Health Facilities Appeals Board. Ms. Mariner served previously on the IOM’s Committee on the Children’s Vaccine Initiative: Planning Alternative Strategies Toward Full United States Participation. Her research interests include patients’ rights, health system reform, and managed care. Ms. Mariner received her J.D. from Columbia University, her LL.M. from New York University, and her M.P.H. from Harvard University. Beth Meyerson, M.Div., Ph.D., is President of the Policy Resource Group, LLC, a health policy research consultancy specializing in STD and HIV policy with domestic and international emphases. Dr. Meyerson is adjunct faculty at Saint Louis University where she teaches health policy in the School of Public Health. She was formerly the AIDS and STD director for the State of Missouri. Her current research includes the impact of federal interventions on the STD program infrastructure; state agency coordination of HIV, mental health, and substance abuse programs; and public health involvement in the policy process. Dr. Meyerson’s most recent research appears in Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Public Health Reports. She received her Ph.D. in Public Policy Analysis and Administration from Saint Louis University. A. David Paltiel, Ph.D., is Associate Professor and Chair of the Division of Health Policy and Administration in the Department of Epidemiology and Public Health at the Yale Medical School. Dr. Paltiel also holds a faculty appointment at the Yale School of Management and is affiliated with the Yale Center for Interdisciplinary Research on AIDS. He has served as a Trustee of the Society for Medical Decision Making and as a

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act member of the Editorial Boards of both Medical Decision Making and Value in Health. Dr. Paltiel’s research deals broadly with issues of resource allocation and decision making in health policy. His AIDS-related research includes a host of model-based cost-effectiveness evaluations in HIV prevention and patient care. Dr. Paltiel received his Ph.D. in Operations Research from Yale. Harold Pollack, Ph.D., was Associate Professor of Health Management and Policy at the University of Michigan School of Public Health during the preparation of this report. He is now Associate Professor of Social Service Administration at the University of Chicago. His main research interests concern substance abuse, HIV prevention, and Medicaid policy for pregnant women, infants, and special needs children. Dr. Pollack served as a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Nutrition Services for Medicare Beneficiaries. He is currently researching substance abuse among welfare recipients, and the cost-effectiveness of harm reduction in the prevention of HIV and hepatitis C. Dr. Pollack’s recent policy research appears in Medical Decision Making, Journal of the American Medical Association, American Journal of Public Health, and other publications. He received his doctorate in Public Policy from Harvard University. George W. Rutherford, M.D., is Salvatore Lucia Professor and Head of the Division of Preventive Medicine and Public Health in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine. He also serves as the Interim Director of the Institute for Global Health at UCSF and the School of Public Health at the University of California, Berkeley (UCB). Dr. Rutherford is a leading expert on the epidemiology of AIDS and HIV infection and the public health aspects of the AIDS epidemic. He served as State Health Officer and State Epidemiologist for the California Department of Health Services from 1990 to 1995. He also formerly served as the Director of the AIDS Office in the San Francisco Department of Public Health in the 1980s and as Director of the Division of Immunizations for the New York City Department of Public Health. His principal research interests are the natural history of HIV infection and the epidemiology of AIDS and HIV infection in California and Latin America. He also has interests and projects in the epidemiology and prevention of coccidioidomycosis, the epidemiology and control of tuberculosis, the elimination of syphilis, and the interface between public health and managed care. He is the coordinating editor for the Cochrane Collaborative Review Group on AIDS and HIV infection, an international effort to systematically review intervention trials in the treatment and prevention of AIDS and HIV infection, and

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act the Chair of the Department of Veterans Affairs’ National Research Advisory Council. Dr. Rutherford received his M.D. from Duke University. Eileen Salinsky, M.B.A., is Principal Research Associate at the National Health Policy Forum at George Washington University. Her current research is focused on public health preparedness and the health care safety net. Ms. Salinsky formerly served as the Director of the Division of Public Health Policy in the Office of Health Policy at the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) in the Department of Health and Human Services. During her tenure at ASPE, she co-chaired the Committee on HHS Data Strategy. Ms. Salinsky was also formerly Vice President at The Lewin Group where she directed studies on states’ efforts to integrate health data, information technology, public health infrastructure, and the costs of uncompensated care. David R. Smith, M.D., is Chancellor of the Texas Tech University System and was previously the Interim Chancellor and president of the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center. Prior to his tenure at Texas Tech, Dr. Smith was the Commissioner of the Texas Department of Health from 1992 to 1996. He received the American Medical Association’s Dr. Nathan Davis Award and the American Public Health Association’s Award of Excellence for outstanding contributions to medicine and public health. Dr. Smith has served on several IOM committees including: the Committee on Immunization Finance Policies and Practices, Committee to Study Outreach for Prenatal Care, and the Committee on the Health and Adjustment of Immigrant Children and Families. He is currently chairing the Committee on Immunization Finance Dissemination Workshops. Dr. Smith received his M.D. from the University of Cincinnati and is board certified in pediatrics. Liaison from the IOM Board on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Robert Wallace, M.D., is Professor of Epidemiology and Internal Medicine at the University of Iowa Colleges of Public Health and Medicine, and Interim Director of the University’s Center on Aging. He has been a member of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) and the National Advisory Council on Aging of the National Institutes of Health. He is currently a member of the Board of the Medical Follow-Up Agency of the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences, and a senior advisor to the USPSTF. He served on the Executive Committee of the Association of Teachers of Preventive Medicine, and was Chair of the Epidemiology Section of the American Public Health Association. He is the author or co-author of over 240 publications and 22 book chapters,

OCR for page 295
Measuring What Matters: Allocation, Planning, and Quality Assessment for the Ryan White CARE Act and has been the editor of 4 books, including the current edition of Maxcy-Rosenau-Last’s Public Health and Preventive Medicine. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Wallace’s research interests concern the causes and prevention of disabling conditions of older persons. He leads the Health Working Group of the Health and Retirement Study, a long-term prospective sample of older Americans exploring health, social, family, and economic policy issues. He is the site Principal Investigator for the Women’s Health Initiative, a national intervention trial exploring the prevention of breast and colon cancer and coronary disease. He has been a collaborator in several international studies of the prevention of chronic illness in older persons.