B
Committee and Staff Biographies

COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES

Lonnie R. Bristow, M.D., Chair, (New York University College of Medicine) is a former president of the American Medical Association, after earlier serving as vice chair and chair of the AMA’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Bristow has written and lectured extensively on medical science as well as socioeconomic and ethical issues related to medicine. He is a board-certified internist and has practiced medicine for more than 30 years. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was appointed to its Quality of Health Care in America committee, which in 1999 and 2001 respectively, authored the widely read reports To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm. Dr. Bristow’s research interests and expertise are eclectic and, over the decades, his writings have included papers on medical ethics, socialized medicine as practiced in Great Britain and Canada, health-care financing in America, professional liability insurance problems, sickle cell anemia, and coronary care unit utilization. Dr. Bristow has recently served as vice chair for the Physician Leadership for a New Drug Policy and also, by Presidential appointment, he served for 6 years as chair of the board of regents of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (Bethesda, MD). He continues as an active member of both groups. In addition he is a reviewer for the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Bristow recently retired from private practice but continues his other activities as a professional consultant.



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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce B Committee and Staff Biographies COMMITTEE BIOGRAPHIES Lonnie R. Bristow, M.D., Chair, (New York University College of Medicine) is a former president of the American Medical Association, after earlier serving as vice chair and chair of the AMA’s Board of Trustees. Dr. Bristow has written and lectured extensively on medical science as well as socioeconomic and ethical issues related to medicine. He is a board-certified internist and has practiced medicine for more than 30 years. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine and was appointed to its Quality of Health Care in America committee, which in 1999 and 2001 respectively, authored the widely read reports To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm. Dr. Bristow’s research interests and expertise are eclectic and, over the decades, his writings have included papers on medical ethics, socialized medicine as practiced in Great Britain and Canada, health-care financing in America, professional liability insurance problems, sickle cell anemia, and coronary care unit utilization. Dr. Bristow has recently served as vice chair for the Physician Leadership for a New Drug Policy and also, by Presidential appointment, he served for 6 years as chair of the board of regents of the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences (Bethesda, MD). He continues as an active member of both groups. In addition he is a reviewer for the Journal of the American Medical Association. Dr. Bristow recently retired from private practice but continues his other activities as a professional consultant.

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce Colleen Conway-Welch, Ph.D., R.N., CNM, FAAN, Vice-Chair, has been dean and professor at Vanderbilt University School of Nursing since 1984. She has served on the Tennessee Board of Nursing, the National Bipartisan Commission on the Future of Medicare, the Advisory Council of the NIH National Center for Nursing Research, and the Advisory Board of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research (AHCPR), now the Agency for Health Care Research and Quality (AHRQ). Dr. Conway-Welch is also a member of the Secretary’s Council on Public Health Preparedness, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public Health Emergency preparedness, DHHS, appointed by Secretary Tommy Thompson. Among her many honors, in 2000 Dr. Conway-Welch was awarded the Nancy and Hilliard Travis Endowed Chair in Nursing and in 2001 received the National Association of Childbearing Centers Public Advocate Award. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, a charter Fellow of the American College of Nurse-Midwives, and a member of Sigma Theta Tau, among other distinctions. Dr. Conway-Welch received her B.S.N. degree from Georgetown University School of Nursing, an M.S.N. degree from Catholic University, and her Ph.D. degree in nursing from New York University. Brenda E. Armstrong, M.D., associate dean and director of Medical School Admissions, associate professor of pediatrics in the Division of Pediatric Cardiology, and associate vice provost at Duke University. She is also program director of the Duke University Summer Biomedical Science Institute, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and director of the Fellowship Training Division of Pediatric Cardiology at Duke University Medical Center. Previously, she was medical director of the Raleigh Multi-Specialty Pediatric Clinic and has served as a consultant to the U.S. Army and U.S. Air Force. She is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and is board certified in pediatrics and pediatric cardiology. Among her many professional activities, Dr. Armstrong serves on the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Appeals Committee, specialty in pediatric cardiology, and serves as a consultant to the Durham County General Hospital. Among her many awards and honors are the Distinguished Faculty Award, Duke University School of Medicine, 2001, and the Association of Black Cardiologists “Hero” Award, 2002. Dr. Armstrong received a B.A. degree from Duke University in 1970 and an M.D. degree from St. Louis University School of Medicine in 1974. Kevin Barnett, Dr.PH, M.C.P., is a senior investigator for the Public Health Institute (PHI) in Oakland, California. His work with the PHI focuses on applied research and technical assistance in population health planning, policy analysis, health system reform, and community problem solving. Dr.

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce Barnett received his doctorate in public health and master’s in city planning from the University of California at Berkeley. He has devoted much of the last 15 years to the facilitation and evaluation of broad-based, inter-sectoral partnerships between organizations and community resident groups to address persistent health-related problems ranging from access to health care to violence, housing, and economic development. A major focus during the last decade has been research into the role of not-for-profit health care organizations in community health improvement. He currently leads a multistate community benefit demonstration program to develop uniform standards for documenting, quantifying, and evaluating institutional performance. Joseph Betancourt, M.D., M.P.H., is senior scientist at the Institute for Health Policy, director for Multicultural Education, Multicultural Affairs Office at Massachusetts General Hospital, and assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Previously, he served as the assistant professor of medicine and public health and the associate director for multinational and minority health at New York Presbyterian Hospital–Weill Medical College of Cornell University. Dr. Betancourt’s research has focused on several areas relevant to the study charge, including: cross-cultural communication and its relationship to adherence, utilization, and health outcomes; cultural competence in health policy; determinants of racial/ ethnic disparities; and the impact of disease management programs in Medicaid managed care. His most current work has involved examining Hispanic health services utilization, cultural competence in health care, and racial differences in lung cancer treatment. Dr. Betancourt was a member of the IOM Committee on Understanding and Eliminating Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care which produced the 2003 report, Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. Michael V. Drake, M.D., is vice president for health affairs of the University of California (UC) system. He oversees education and research activities at UC’s 15 health sciences schools located on 7 University of California campuses. Previously, he served as vice chair, Department of Ophthalmology; senior associate dean for Admissions and Extramural Academic Programs; interim associate dean for student affairs; professor of ophthalmology; associate dean for admissions and student programs; and chief, Vision Care and Research Unit, Beckman Vision Center, all at the UCSF School of Medicine. He maintains his position as Stephen P. Shearing Professor of Opthalmology and is engaged in teaching, research, and patient care on a limited basis. He received his A.B. degree from Stanford University in 1974 and his M.D. degree from UCSF in 1975. Dr. Drake has served in many roles within the UC system, including service on the UC Medical School

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce Admissions/Diversity Task Force, and has testified before the California State Senate and Assembly on diversity issues. Among his numerous awards and distinctions, he is president of the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Dr. Drake is a member of the Institute of Medicine Jay Alan Gershen, D.D.S., Ph.D., is executive vice chancellor and professor in the School of Dentistry at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center. In addition to assisting the chancellor in administering the campus, Dr. Gershen has had responsibility for resource development, external and community affairs, technology transfer, information systems, diversity, ombuds, and telehealth programs. Concurrently, from 2000 to 2002, Dr. Gershen served as interim vice president for academic affairs and research, University of Colorado. Dr. Gershen holds a B.A. in psychology from the State University of New York at Buffalo (1968) and a D.D.S. from the University of Maryland (1972). After a one year general dentistry internship at Eastman Dental Center, Rochester, New York, he completed both a clinical specialty in pediatric dentistry and a Ph.D. in education at the University of California, Los Angeles, in 1976. Concurrently, he served as a postdoctoral scholar in child psychiatry at UCLA’s Neuropsychiatric Institute. Dr. Gershen joined the faculty of the School of Dentistry at UCLA in 1976. For 6 years (1976–1982) he directed the UCLA Mobile Dental Clinic, serving children of migrant workers in rural California. Dr. Gershen was awarded a Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship (1982–1983), sponsored by the Institute of Medicine. In this capacity he worked on health policy issues and legislation in the Committee on Energy and Commerce in the U.S. House of Representatives. Dr. Gershen served as associate dean for policy and program development from 1983 to 1984, and professor and chair in the Section of Public Health Dentistry from 1988 to 1995. As acting dean of the School of Dentistry (1995–1996), he was the first dental dean in the nation to gain Graduate Medical Education (GME) support funds for all of the School of Dentistry’s postdoctoral programs. Lazar J. Greenfield, M.D., is on sabbatical with the Center for Medical Devices, FDA. He is emeritus executive vice president for Medical Affairs at the University of Michigan (U-M) and interim chief executive officer of the U-M Health System. Dr. Greenfield attended Rice University before graduating with honors from Baylor University College of Medicine in 1958. He trained in general and thoracic surgery at the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1958 to 1966. Dr. Greenfield began his academic surgical career as assistant professor of surgery and chief of surgical services at the Veteran’s Administration Hospital, University of Oklahoma Medical Center in 1966. He was named a Markle Scholar and became professor of surgery in 1971. In 1974, Dr. Greenfield was appointed the Stuart McGuire Professor and

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce chairman of the Department of Surgery at the Medical College of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University. He remained in that position until 1987, when he was appointed the F.A. Coller Distinguished Professor of Surgery and chairman of the Department of Surgery at the University of Michigan School of Medicine. Dr. Greenfield is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons and has served on the board of governors. He served on the board of the national honor society, Alpha Omega Alpha, and has been elected president of the American Surgical Association, the American Venous Forum, American Association of Vascular Surgery, and the Halsted Society. He has been a director of the American Board of Surgery and past Chairman of the national ACGME-Residency Review Committee for Surgery. In 1995, Dr. Greenfield was elected to the Institute of Medicine. In 1996, he was designated a Johns Hopkins Society Scholar and in 1999 he received the Rice University Distinguished Alumnus Award. Robert L. Johnson, M.D., is professor and chair of pediatrics, professor of psychiatry and director of the Division of Adolescent and Young Adult Medicine at the New Jersey Medical School of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. His research focuses on adolescent physical and prevention/reduction programs, with specific emphasis on substance and alcohol abuse, sexuality and sexual dysfunction, male sexual abuse, suicide, and AIDS. He currently serves on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Council on Graduate Medical Education, the Board of Health Care Services of the National Academy of Sciences, and chairs the Newark Ryan White Planning Council. Dr. Johnson is a Fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. He has previously been a member of the National Council of the National Institute of Mental Health, member of the NIH AIDS Research Council, member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Unintended Pregnancy, chair of the National Commission on Adolescent Sexuality, president of the New Jersey State Board of Medical Examiners and chair of the Board of Advocates for Youth. Dr. Johnson has published widely, and he conducts an active schedule of teaching, research, and clinical practice at the New Jersey Medical School. Ciro V. Sumaya, M.D., M.P.H.T.M., is a native of Brownsville, Texas, dean of the School of Rural Public Health (SRPH), and holder of the Cox Endowed Chair in Medicine at Texas A&M University Health Science Center in College Station. Before coming to the SRPH, Dr. Sumaya served as a presidential appointee for 4 years at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. He first served as administrator of Health Resources and Services Administration, a federal focal point for innovation in health-care delivery and health professions education, and subsequently served as deputy assistant secretary for Health, spearheading the federal initiative on

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce the Future of Academic Health Centers. Before federal service, Dr. Sumaya was associate medical dean at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. As associate dean he established the South Texas Health Research Center, Area Health Education Center of South Texas, and a Medical Treatment Effectiveness Research Center. He has also held academic positions at the UCLA School of Medicine. Dr. Sumaya was one of the six Founding Scholars in Academic Administration and Health Policy of the Association of Academic Health Centers and executive committee member of the Surgeon General’s National Hispanic Health Initiative. In 1993 he was selected as a group leader of the Health Care Workforce workgroup of the Presidential Task Force on Health Care Reform. He received a B.A. degree (1963) with high honors from the University of Texas at Austin, where he was also elected to Phi Beta Kappa. His M.D. degree (1966) was obtained from the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, where he was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Lisa Tedesco, Ph.D., is vice president and secretary of the university and professor of dentistry, at the University of Michigan and during 2001 served as interim provost. As vice president and secretary, she is the liaison officer for the board of regents; responsible for facilitation, coordination, and management of policy matters and communications pertaining to the board, the president, and executive officers of the university. Throughout her academic and administrative career, Dr. Tedesco has been involved with programs to increase student and faculty diversity on campus. She was coprincipal investigator of the University of Michigan Health Occupations Partners in Education (HOPE) project funded through the American Association of Medical Colleges Health Professions Partnership Initiative to provide academic preparation and social support to disadvantaged and minority youth for careers in the health professions. In October 1995 she was inducted as an honorary member of the American Dental Association, in recognition for her contributions to academic dentistry, and in May 1998 she received the Distinguished Alumni Award from the State University of New York at Buffalo, Graduate School of Education. Dr. Tedesco earned her master’s degree in education in 1975 and her doctorate in educational psychology in 1981, both from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Ena Vazquez-Nuttall, Ed.D., is associate dean and director of the graduate school of Bouve College of Health Sciences at Northeastern University in Boston. This graduate school contains programs in counseling and school psychology, pharmaceutical sciences, nursing, and allied health. She started at Northeastern in 1989 as a professor in the Department of Counseling Psychology, Rehabilitation and Special Education. From 1975 to 1988,

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce Vazquez-Nuttall was a professor in the Counseling and School Psychology Program at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. She has served in many state and national professional committees and boards. She was chair of the Training and Education Group of the Commission on Ethnic Minority Recruitment, Retention, and Training in Psychology (CEMRRAT) of the American Psychological Association (APA) from 1994 to1996. For 5 years, Dr. Vazquez-Nuttall was a member of the Committee on Accreditation of APA (1998–2002). She is a fellow of Division 16 (school psychology) of APA, and member of Division 17 (counseling psychology) and 35 (women’s division). She served on the Massachusetts Board of Registration from 1988 to 1993. She has been a member of several editorial boards, including School Psychology Quarterly, School Psychology Review, American Journal of Counseling and Development, and the Journal of Counselor Education and Supervision. At present she is on the editorial board of Applied School Psychology. Dr. Vazquez-Nuttall has written two books with collaborators Assessing and Screening Preschoolers (1999, Allyn & Bacon, with Romero & Kalesnik) and Multicultural Counseling Competencies: Individual and Organization Development (1998, Sage, with Sue, Carter, Casas, Fouad, Ivey et al). She has received several NIMH research awards and OSEP personnel preparation grants. She has extensive program evaluation experience, including of bilingual education programs and a National Science Foundation-funded parent involvement grant. She obtained a bachelor’s degree from the University of Puerto Rico, master’s degree in social psychology from Radcliffe, and Ed.D. from Boston University. Judith A. Winston, J.D., is the former under secretary and general counsel of the U.S. Department of Education and former executive director of the President’s Initiative on Race. Ms. Winston is currently a lawyer in private practice and a principal and cofounder of the legal consulting firm Winston Withers & Associates, LLC, in Washington, DC. She assists businesses, schools, colleges, universities and nonprofit entities in understanding and developing effective equity, diversity, and equal opportunity management and organizational strategies consistent with legal requirements and best practices. Prior to her most recent government service, Winston served as research professor of law at the Washington College of Law at American University. Her research and teaching responsibilities included constitutional law, education law and policy, civil rights, and civil procedure. Ms. Winston has received a number of honors and citations, including the prestigious Thurgood Marshall Award, from the District of Columbia Bar Association, recognizing her lifetime commitment to the cause of civil rights, and the Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement Award from the American Bar Association’s Commission on Women in the Profession. She

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce has served on numerous boards and committees including the board of directors of National Public Radio, Partners for Democratic Change, and the Southern Education Foundation, and the National Law Center on Poverty and Homelessness. She is the author of many articles on civil rights, employment discrimination, women of color in the workplace, and education. Ms. Winston is a graduate of the Georgetown University Law Center and Howard University. Vickie Ybarra, R.N., M.P.H., is director of planning and development for the Yakima Valley Farm Workers Clinic, one of the largest community/ migrant health care systems in the country, with clinics in Washington and Oregon. She has extensive experience in development, oversight, and evaluation of community programs targeting Hispanic and Spanish-speaking populations. She earned her undergraduate degree in nursing from the University of Washington School of Nursing and in 1996 completed her master’s in public health at the University of Washington. In her role as a member of the Washington State Board of Health she has provided leadership for the board’s health disparities efforts and in May 2001 coauthored the board’s report on health disparities, focusing on diversifying the state health-care workforce. Ms. Ybarra has been active in efforts to connect local communities to institutions of higher education. She has conducted research related to the presence and service needs of local undocumented women and children. She also served as a member of the Community-Campus Partnerships for Health board of directors from 1995 to 2000. Ms. Ybarra is active in her community in Hispanic academic achievement. She works with a local group to distribute scholarship dollars and provide community-wide recognition for academic success of local outstanding Hispanic high school graduates. She has conducted research with the local school district demonstrating the wide gap in college preparedness between Hispanic and non-Hispanic students. Ms. Ybarra is also a recently appointed member of the local school board, with a particular focus on closing the achievement gap between Hispanic and non-Hispanic students. IOM STAFF BIOGRAPHIES Andrew Pope, Ph.D., is director of the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine. With expertise in physiology and biochemistry, his primary interests focus on environmental and occupational influences on human health. Dr. Pope’s previous research activities focused on the neuroendocrine and reproductive effects of various environmental sub-stances on food-producing animals. During his tenure at the National Academy of Sciences and, since 1989, at the Institute of Medicine, Dr. Pope has directed numerous reports; topics include injury control, disability preven-

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce tion, biologic markers, neurotoxicology, indoor allergens, and the enhancement of environmental and occupational health content in medical and nursing school curricula. Most recently, Dr. Pope directed studies on NIH priority-setting processes, fluid resuscitation practices in combat casualties, and organ procurement and transplantation. Brian D. Smedley, Ph.D., is a senior program officer in the Division of Health Sciences Policy of the Institute of Medicine (IOM), where he most recently served as study director for the IOM report, Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. Previously, Smedley served as study director for the IOM reports, Promoting Health: Intervention Strategies from Social and Behavioral Research; The Right Thing to Do, The Smart Thing to Do: Enhancing Diversity in the Health Professions; and The Unequal Burden of Cancer: An Assessment of NIH Research and Programs for Ethnic Minorities and the Medically Underserved. Smedley came to the IOM from the American Psychological Association, where he worked on a wide range of social, health, and education policy topics in his capacity as director for public interest policy. Prior to working at the APA, Smedley served as a congressional science fellow in the office of Rep. Robert C. Scott (D-VA), sponsored by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and as a postdoctoral research fellow in the Education Policy Division of the Educational Testing Service in Princeton, NJ. Among his awards and distinctions, in 2000 and 2003 Smedley was awarded the National Academy of Sciences’ Individual Staff Award for Distinguished Service, in April 2002 he was awarded the Congressional Black Caucus “Healthcare Hero” award, and in August 2002 he was awarded the Early Career Award for Distinguished Contributions to Psychology in the Public Interest by the American Psychological Association. Adrienne Stith Butler, Ph.D., is a program officer with the Board on Health Sciences Policy at the Institute of Medicine (IOM). She is currently a staff officer for the IOM Committee on Institutional and Policy-Level Strategies for Increasing the Diversity of the U.S. Health Care Workforce. She recently served as study director for the IOM report Preparing for the Psychological Consequences of Terrorism: A Public Health Strategy, conducted within the Board on Neuroscience and Behavioral Health. Previously she served as staff officer for the IOM report Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care, conducted within the Board on Health Sciences Policy. Prior to working at the IOM, Dr. Butler served as the James Marshall Public Policy Scholar, a fellowship cosponsored by the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues and the American Psychological Association (APA). In this position, based at the APA in Wash-

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In The Nation’s Compelling Interest: Ensuring Diversity in the Health-Care Workforce ington, DC, she engaged in policy analysis and monitored legislative issues related to ethnic disparities in health care and health research, racial profiling, and mental health counseling provisions in the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Dr. Butler, a clinical psychologist, received her doctorate in 1997 from the University of Vermont. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in adolescent medicine and pediatric psychology at the University of Rochester Medical Center in Rochester, New York. Thelma Cox is a senior project assistant in the Board on Health Sciences Policy. During her years at the Institute of Medicine (IOM), she has also provided assistance to the Division of Health Care Services and the Division of Biobehavioral Sciences and Mental Disorders. Ms. Cox has worked on several IOM reports, including Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care; Designing a Strategy for Quality Review and Assurance in Medicare; Evaluating the Artificial Heart Program of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Federal Regulation of Methadone Treatment; Legal and Ethical Issues Relating to the Inclusion of Women in Clinical Studies; and Review of the Fialuridine (FIAU/ FIAC) Clinical Trials. She has received the National Research Council Recognition Award and the IOM Staff Achievement Award.

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