TABLE 4.1 Annual Production of Ammunitions Produced in the United States

Ammunition Type

No. Rounds Produced per Year, billions

No. Boxes Produced per Year, millions

No. Units per Box

Shotgun shells (all gauges)

1.1

44

25

Rifle, center fire

0.25

12.5

20

Pistol and revolver, center fire

0.55

11

50

Rifle and pistol, rimfire

2

40

50

 

Source: See Footnote 7.

TABLE 4.2 Examples of Various Caliber and Style of Bullets and Estimated Bullet Mass

Caliber

Style

Total Mass of Projectile (Mass of Pb if Jacketed)

Grains

Ounces

Grams

.22 Long rifle

Round nose/Hollow point

40

0.0914

2.59

9 × 19 mm

Lead round nose

124

0.283

8.04

9 × 19 mm

Full metal jacket

124 (103.0)

0.283 (0.237)

8.04 (6.71)

.38 special

Lead round nose

150

0.343

9.72

44 Remington magnum

Lead truncated cone

240

0.549

15.6

5.56 × 45 mm

Full metal jacket

62 (31.6)

0.142 (0.0722)

4.02 (2.05)

5.56 × 45 mm

Full metal jacket

55 (46.1)

0.126 (0.105)

3.56 (2.99)

7.62 × 51 mm

Full metal jacket

145 (93.1)

0.331 (0.213)

9.40 (6.03)

products. Calculations assumed a mass of 40 grains (0.0914 oz, 2.59 g) for a .22 rimfire projectile. The number of projectiles is based on 100 percent yield. Since some material is not converted directly to the final bullets (for example, initial piece of extruded wire, weep from bullet presses), the actual number of projectiles produced will be lower.

In the United States, secondary smelters melt recycled lead (primarily from recycled lead-acid storage batteries) for bullet lead processing in large pots.8 The designation of primary smelter is reserved for manufacturing facilities that produce lead from ores. Such facilities are rarely associated directly with bullet production in the United States, but this is not the case in some foreign countries. Secondary smelting is reported to account for half the lead produced in the

8  

Smith, G. R. Lead Recycling in the United States in 1998. USGS Circular: 1196-F. 2002. <http://pubs.usgs.gov/circ/c1196f/>.



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