Cover Image

PAPERBACK
$59.95



View/Hide Left Panel

TABLE S-1 Percent of Median Total Water Intake in the United States from Beverages (Including Drinking Water) and Food

Life Stage Groupa

Percent from Beveragesb

Percent from Foods

Both sexes, 0–6 mo

100

0

Both sexes, 7–12 mo

74

26

Both sexes, 1–3 y

71

29

Both sexes, 4–8 y

70

30

M, 9–13 y

76

24

M, 14–18 y

80

20

M, 19–30 y

81

19

M, 31–50 y

81

19

M, 51–70 y

81

19

M, > 70 y

81

19

F, 9–13 y

75

25

F, 14–18 y

80

20

F, 19–30 y

81

19

F, 31–50 y

81

19

F, 51–70 y

81

19

F, > 70 y

81

19

Pregnant

77

22

Lactating

82

18

aM = male, F = female.

bIncludes drinking water.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Center for Health Statistics, Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1988–1994.

Examination Survey (NHANES III) indicate that serum osmolality, an indicator of hydration status, is maintained at a constant level over a wide range of total water intakes (i.e., serum osmolality is nearly identical for individuals in the lowest decile of reported intake compared with those in the highest decile of intake). Based on these data, the AI for total water (from consuming a combination of drinking water, beverages, and food) is set based on the median total water intake from the U.S. NHANES III data (Table S-2). The AI for total water intake for young men and women (19 through 30 years) is 3.7 L and 2.7 L per day, respectively (see Table S-2).1 In the NHANES, fluids (beverages and drinking water) provided approximately 3.0 L (101 fluid ounces; ≈ 13 cups) and 2.2 L (74 fluid

1  

Conversion factors: 1 L = 33.8 fluid oz; 1 L = 1.06 qt; 1 cup = 8 fluid oz.



The National Academies | 500 Fifth St. N.W. | Washington, D.C. 20001
Copyright © National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.
Terms of Use and Privacy Statement