C
Committee Member Biographical Sketches

Bettie Sue S. Masters (chair) is the Robert A. Welch Foundation Professor in Chemistry in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Her research involves the determination of the structure and function relationships of heme- and flavin-requiring enzymes, specifically nitric oxide synthases and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, employing a variety of spectroscopic and crystallographic techniques. Currently, she serves on the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health and she is president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Dr. Masters received her Ph.D. in biochemistry from Duke University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine.

Fuller W. Bazer is associate vice chancellor and associate director of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and executive associate dean in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University. He is also professor and holds the O.D. Butler Chair in the Department of Animal Sciences, with joint appointments in the Departments of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, and Human Anatomy and Medical Neurobiology. His research, which is partially funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, focuses on reproductive and developmental biology, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms of pregnancy recognition signals from the conceptus to the uterus, and on uterine biology in domestic animals. Dr. Bazer is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of ADViSYS, Inc., which is developing novel approaches to modulate growth hormone in animals for therapeutic and performance enhancement applications. He earned his Ph.D. in animal science at North Carolina State University.



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Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods: Approaches to Assessing Unintended Health Effects C Committee Member Biographical Sketches Bettie Sue S. Masters (chair) is the Robert A. Welch Foundation Professor in Chemistry in the Department of Biochemistry at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. Her research involves the determination of the structure and function relationships of heme- and flavin-requiring enzymes, specifically nitric oxide synthases and NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, employing a variety of spectroscopic and crystallographic techniques. Currently, she serves on the Advisory Committee to the Director of the National Institutes of Health and she is president of the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Dr. Masters received her Ph.D. in biochemistry from Duke University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine. Fuller W. Bazer is associate vice chancellor and associate director of the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and executive associate dean in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences at Texas A&M University. He is also professor and holds the O.D. Butler Chair in the Department of Animal Sciences, with joint appointments in the Departments of Veterinary Anatomy and Public Health, Veterinary Physiology and Pharmacology, and Human Anatomy and Medical Neurobiology. His research, which is partially funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, focuses on reproductive and developmental biology, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms of pregnancy recognition signals from the conceptus to the uterus, and on uterine biology in domestic animals. Dr. Bazer is a member of the Scientific Advisory Board of ADViSYS, Inc., which is developing novel approaches to modulate growth hormone in animals for therapeutic and performance enhancement applications. He earned his Ph.D. in animal science at North Carolina State University.

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Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods: Approaches to Assessing Unintended Health Effects Shirley A. A. Beresford is a professor in the Department of Epidemiology of the School of Public Health and Community Medicine at the University of Washington. She is also a member in the Epidemiology and Cancer Prevention Research Programs at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. Dr. Beresford’s research interests are in the areas of nutritional epidemiology and cancer prevention. She is chair of the Dietary Modification Advisory Committee for the Women’s Health Initiative. She received her Ph.D. in epidemiology from the University of London. Dean DellaPenna is a professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Michigan State University. He uses molecular, genetic, and biochemical approaches to understand fundamental processes, including secondary metabolic pathways, in plants of importance to agriculture. His research is partially funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development and the National Science Foundation. Dr. DellaPenna holds several patents on biochemical and genetic techniques related to his research. He is a consultant and a member of a scientific advisory board for a genomics-based pharmaceutical company. Dr. DellaPenna received his Ph.D. in plant physiology from the University of California at Davis. Terry D. Etherton is a distinguished professor of animal nutrition and head of the Department of Dairy and Animal Science at The Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on endocrine regulation of animal growth. He is an authority on the role of agricultural biotechnology in food production systems. Dr. Etherton chaired the National Research Council committee that authored the report, Metabolic Modifiers: Effects on the Nutrient Requirements of Food-Producing Animals. He is co-chair of the Federation of Animal Science Societies Scientific Advisory Committee on Biotechnology. Dr. Etherton received his Ph.D. in animal sciences from the University of Minnesota. Cutberto Garza is a professor in the Division of Nutritional Sciences at Cornell University. His research interests are maternal and infant nutrition, nutrient needs of women and young children, and long-term metabolic consequences to perinatal nutrition. Dr. Garza chairs an international effort sponsored by the World Health Organization (WHO), the United Nations University, and others to develop new international references for child growth and chairs the Technical Advisory Group for the Review of Safety, Nutritional Value, Suitability, and Appropriateness of Foods used by the World Food Program. Previously, he cochaired a review of genetically modified foods for the United States and the European Union and chaired the 2000 U.S. Dietary Guidelines Committee for the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services. He is a member of the the WHO Reference Group on a Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity, and Health, and until recently, served on the National Institutes of Health Fogarty Center’s Advisory Board. He is a member of the Institute of

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Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods: Approaches to Assessing Unintended Health Effects Medicine and former chair of the Food and Nutrition Board. Dr. Garza received his M.D. from Baylor College of Medicine and his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Lynn R. Goldman is a professor in Environmental Health Sciences and Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. She is also director of the Mid-Atlantic Public Health Training Center and a visiting scientist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dr. Goldman’s expertise is in environmental epidemiology and toxicology. She previously as served as division chief of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control in the California Department of Health Services and then as assistant administrator in the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic substances, at the Environmental Protection Agency, where she led the pollution prevention, pesticide regulation, toxic substances control, and right-to-know programs. Sidney Green, Jr. is a graduate professor in the Department of Pharmacology at Howard University. Previously, he held several positions within the Food and Drug Administration’s Division of Toxicological Research, including chief of the Whole Animal Toxicology Branch, associate director for Laboratory Investigations, and director of the Division. Dr. Green also was a branch chief for the Environmental Protection Agency and director of toxicology for a private testing laboratory. Dr. Green has broad knowledge of the field of toxicology; specific areas of expertise include food toxicology, genetic toxicology, and the use of alternatives to whole animals in toxicology. He is a fellow of the Academy of Toxicological Sciences. Dr. Green received his Ph.D. in biochemical pharmacology from Howard University. Jesse F. Gregory, III is a professor in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at the University of Florida. His research interests are in the areas of food chemistry and nutritional biochemistry, specifically on the bioavailability, metabolism, and function of B vitamins, with primary emphasis on folate and vitamin B6. Dr. Gregory received his Ph.D. in food science from Michigan State University. Jennifer Hillard is a volunteer with the Consumer Interest Alliance. From 1996 to 2002, she served as National Vice President of Issues and Policy at the Consumer Association of Canada (CAC). Her responsibilities involved coordinating CAC’s work on a range of issues, including those related to food, health, and biotechnology. She has produced informational booklets in collaboration with the CAC and the Food Biotechnology Communications network, a voluntary organization of federal and provincial governmental departments and associations from the biotechnology and food producer industries. She has also written many health and safety articles for publications designed for low literacy con-

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Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods: Approaches to Assessing Unintended Health Effects sumers. Ms. Hillard also served as acting chair of CAC’s Food and Agriculture Committee and is a member of a multi-stakeholder advisory committee to the Canadian Research Institute for Food Safety at the University of Guelph, the Canadian General Standards Board Committee (this multi-stakeholder committee is developing a standard for voluntary labeling of food produced from biotechnology), and the Canadian Biotechnology Advisory Committee-Genetically Modified Food Reference Group. She has participated in consultations on various aspects of agricultural biotechnology with Health Canada, Industry Canada, Environment Canada, and Agriculture and Agri Food Canada. Alan G. McHughen is a biotechnology specialist in the Department of Botany and Plant Sciences at the University of California, Riverside. Until recently, he was professor and senior research scientist in the Crop Development Centre in the College of Agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan. Dr. McHughen’s research interests include crop improvement using both conventional breeding and genetic engineering techniques. He helped develop Canada’s regulations covering the environmental release of plants with novel traits. His recent book, Pandora’s Picnic Basket: The Potential and Hazards of Genetically Modified Foods, describes in layperson terms the technologies underlying genetic modification of foods. Dr. McHughen received his D. Phil. from Oxford University. Sanford A. Miller is a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the Center for Food and Nutrition Policy at Virginia Polytechnic and State University in Alexandria, Virginia. Previously, he was director of the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition at the Food and Drug Administration (1978–1987), and dean of the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and a professor in the Departments of Biochemistry and Medicine at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (1987–2000). Dr. Miller’s research interests are in the areas of food safety and public policy, nutrition, and food toxicology. He is the chair of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration’s Food Advisory Committee. He previously served on the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board and is a member of the National Research Council’s standing Committee on Agricultural Biotechnology, Health, and the Environment. Dr. Miller received his Ph.D. from Rutgers University. Stephen L. Taylor is the Maxcy Distinguished Professor and head of the Department of Food Science and Technology and director of the Food Processing Center at the University of Nebraska. His research involves food allergies and allergy-like diseases, the assessment of the allergenicity of genetically-modified foods, and the development of immunochemical methods for the detection of allergens, proteins, and toxins. He has served as a consultant to a number of food and biotechnology companies and also serves on the Advisory Board for the Joint Institute of Food Safety and Applied Nutrition, sponsored by the University of

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Safety of Genetically Engineered Foods: Approaches to Assessing Unintended Health Effects Maryland and the Food and Drug Administration, and is codirector of the Food Allergy Research and Resource Program at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. He is a member of the Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board and served as chair of its Food Chemicals Codex committee from 1989–2000. Dr. Taylor is an internationally recognized expert on food allergens and food safety, particularly as they relate to bioengineered foods. He received his Ph.D. in biochemistry from the University of California, Davis. Timothy R. Zacharewski is an associate professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and in the National Food Safety and Toxicology Center at Michigan State University. His research interest is in the area of mechanistic toxicology; specifically, he studies how synthetic and natural chemicals elicit toxicity by altering gene expression. His laboratory utilizes genomic (including microarray), biochemical, and toxicological techniques. Dr. Zacharewski received his Ph.D. in toxicology from Texas A&M University.

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