Appendix A
Biographical Information on Committee Members

Front (left to right) Edwin E. Herricks, William L. Graf, W. Carter Johnson, Hsieh Wen Shen

Back (left to right) Edward J. Peters, Dennis D. Murphy, Richard N. Palmer, Frank Lupi, Holly Doremus, Francesca Cuthbert, Lisa M. Butler Harrington, John “Jeb” A. Barzen, Katharine L. Jacobs, James Anthony Thompson

GEOMORPHOLOGY

William L. Graf (Chair) is Educational Foundation University Professor and professor of geography at the University of South Carolina. He earned a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1974 in physical geography with a minor in water resources management. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and policy for public land and water, with emphasis on river channel change, human influences on river processes and morphology, contaminant transport and storage in river sediments, and the



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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River Appendix A Biographical Information on Committee Members Front (left to right) Edwin E. Herricks, William L. Graf, W. Carter Johnson, Hsieh Wen Shen Back (left to right) Edward J. Peters, Dennis D. Murphy, Richard N. Palmer, Frank Lupi, Holly Doremus, Francesca Cuthbert, Lisa M. Butler Harrington, John “Jeb” A. Barzen, Katharine L. Jacobs, James Anthony Thompson GEOMORPHOLOGY William L. Graf (Chair) is Educational Foundation University Professor and professor of geography at the University of South Carolina. He earned a PhD from the University of Wisconsin, Madison in 1974 in physical geography with a minor in water resources management. His specialties include fluvial geomorphology and policy for public land and water, with emphasis on river channel change, human influences on river processes and morphology, contaminant transport and storage in river sediments, and the

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River downstream effects of large dams. Much of his early work focused on dryland rivers; for the last several years, his work has been national in scope. He has served as an officer in the Geological Society of America and is past president of the Association of American Geographers. In public-policy work, he has emphasized the interaction of science and decision making and resolution of the conflict between economic development and environmental preservation. Dr. Graf’s work has been funded by 52 grants and contracts from federal, state, and local agencies. He has given more than 100 professional presentations and published 130 papers, articles, book chapters, and reports on geomorphology, riparian ecology, river management, and the interaction between science and public policy. His eight books include Geomorphic Systems of North America, The Colorado River: Basin Stability and Management, Fluvial Processes in Dryland Rivers, Wilderness Preservation and the Sagebrush Rebellions, and Plutonium and the Rio Grande, and he is the primary author and editor of New Strategies for America’s Watersheds and Research Opportunities in Geography at the U.S. Geological Survey. He is principal author of Dam Removal: Science and Decision Making and editor of Science for Dam Removal, and he is working on Dam the Consequences: The Effects of Dams on America’s Rivers. His work has produced awards from the Association of American Geographers, the Geological Society of America, and the British Geomorphological Research Group, and he has received a Guggenheim Fellowship, a Fulbright Senior Scholarship, and the Founders’ Medal awarded by Queen Elizabeth II of Great Britain and the Royal Geographical Society. Dr. Graf has served as a science and policy adviser in numerous capacities for federal, state, and local agencies and organizations. He is a national associate of the National Academy of Sciences, and at the National Research Council he has been a member of the Board on Earth Sciences and Resources, the Water and Science Technology Board, the Committee on Glen Canyon Environmental Studies, the Panel to Review the Critical Ecosystem Studies Initiative for Everglades National Park, Committee on the Restoration of the Greater Everglades Ecosystem, and the Committee on Rediscovering Geography. He has also chaired the Research Council Committee on Innovative Watershed Management, the Workshop to Advise the President’s Council on Sustainable Development, and a committee to advise the U.S. Geological Survey on research priorities in geography. He chairs the Heinz Center’s committee on the Social, Economic, and Environmental Outcomes of Dam Removal and has been the river specialist on teams to advise Costa Rica on dam and river management and a member of a recovery team of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for endangered riparian birds. He also serves on the Committee on Research and Exploration of the National Geographic Society. President Clinton appointed Dr. Graf to the

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River Presidential Commission on American Heritage Rivers to advise the White House on river management. RIVER ECOLOGY W. Carter Johnson is professor of ecology at South Dakota State University in Brookings. Dr. Johnson earned a BS in biology from Augustana College (Sioux Falls) in 1968 and a PhD in botany (plant ecology) from North Dakota State University in 1971. Dr. Johnson began his professional career as research associate and research staff member at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (1971-1977), followed by 12 years in the Department of Biology at Virginia Polytechnic Institute. From 1989 to 1995, he served as head of the Department of Horticulture, Forestry, Landscape, and Parks at South Dakota State University. His research interests include river regulation and riparian forest ecology, climate change and prairie wetlands, seed dispersal in fragmented landscapes, and paleoecology (climate reconstruction using tree rings and Holocene seed dispersal and plant migration). His research program is strongly multidisciplinary and interinstitutional. He was the recipient of the William S. Cooper Award from the Ecological Society of America in 1996 and the Best Paper Award from the International Association of Landscape Ecology in 1995 for his 1994 ecological monograph, Woodland Expansion in the Platte River, Nebraska: Patterns and Causes. He is a life member of the Ecological Society of America and has served on the editorial boards of Landscape Ecology and Wetlands. He was previously appointed to two National Research Council panels: the Committee on Water Resources Management, Instream Flows, and Salmon Survival in the Columbia River (2002-2004) and the Committee on Missouri River Basin Ecosystem Science (1999-2002). AVIAN BIOLOGY Whooping Crane John “Jeb” A. Barzen has been director of field ecology at the International Crane Foundation (ICF) for 15 years. He has a BS in wildlife biology from the University of Minnesota and an MS in biology from the University of North Dakota. He has worked to implement conservation activities on private lands; worked to restore prairie, savanna, and wetland ecosystems in southern Wisconsin and in Asia; and conducted research on cranes and other species of waterbirds. Specifically, he has directed a long-term research project on sandhill cranes, with a focus on crop damage and other habitat selection issues; Siberian cranes as they interact with a variable and hidden food resource on winter habitats; the creation of wetland reserves in

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River Southeast Asia to prevent the extinction of the eastern sarus crane; and factors that influence the re-establishment of prairie plant communities as they change over time. Piping Plover and Interior Least Tern Francesca Cuthbert is professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities campus. She is also co-director of the university’s Conservation Biology Graduate Program. She earned a PhD at the University of Minnesota. Dr. Cuthbert is also an adjunct professor at the University of Michigan Biological Station. Her research interests include the biology and conservation of small avian populations (especially colonial waterbirds and shorebirds), and the recovery of endangered populations using an ecosystem perspective. A current research focus is the recovery of the endangered Great Lakes piping plover population, including studies on demography, captive rearing and reintroduction, and winter and breeding ecology, all in the context of management of coastal shore ecosystems. FISH BIOLOGY Edward J. Peters is professor of fisheries in the School of Natural Resource Sciences at the University of Nebraska. Dr. Peters earned a BS in conservation and biology from Wisconsin State University and an MS and a PhD in zoology from Brigham Young University. His primary research has been in habitat use and ecology of riverine and reservoir fisheries. Dr. Peters has published and presented papers on habitat use by riverine fish and invertebrates and pallid sturgeon in the Platte River. He has served multiple terms as president of the Nebraska Chapter of the American Fisheries Society and has been an active member of the Middle Basin Pallid Sturgeon Recovery Work Group. CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Dennis D. Murphy is research professor in the Biology Department and director of the graduate program in ecology, evolution, and conservation biology at the University of Nevada, Reno. He received a BS at the University of California, Berkeley and a doctorate from Stanford University. Until recently, he served as director and then as President of the Center for Conservation Biology at Stanford. Author of more than 170 published papers and book chapters on the biology of butterflies and on key issues in the conservation of imperiled species, Dr. Murphy has worked in conflict resolution in land-use planning on private property since the first federal Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) on San Bruno Mountain, including HCPs

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River in the Pacific Northwest, southern California, and Nevada. He won the industry’s oldest and most respected prize in conservation, the Chevron Conservation Award; has been named a Pew Scholar in Conservation and the Environment; and has received the California Governor’s Leadership Award in Economics and the Environment. Dr. Murphy has served a number of scientific societies and environmental organizations and is past president of the Society for Conservation Biology. His professional activities outside academia include service on the Interagency Spotted Owl Scientific Advisory Committee, enjoined by Congress to develop a solution to that planning crisis in the Pacific Northwest, as chair of the National Park Service’s Scientific Advisory Committee on Bighorn Sheep, as cochair of the Department of State’s American-Russian Young Investigators Program in Biodiversity and Ecology, as codirector of the statewide Nevada Biodiversity Initiative based at the University of Nevada at Reno, and as chair of the Scientific Review Panel of the first Natural Community Conservation Planning Program in southern California’s coastal sage scrub ecosystem. He served the National Research Council on its Committee on Scientific Issues in the Endangered Species Act and in its contribution to the recent General Accounting Office review of desert tortoise management and recovery. He has been a member of both the Applied Science Panel and the Interagency Working Group of the federal-state Coastal Salmon Initiative in northern California. Dr. Murphy’s continuing activities in conservation planning and adaptive management include service on the Science Board of the Cal-Fed Ecosystem Restoration Planning Program for the Sacramento and San Joaquin River systems, development of a conservation strategy for the imperiled Tahoe Yellow Cress for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, development of a watershed-based ecosystem-management framework for the Truckee, Carson, and Walker hydrological units in the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest, and adaptive-management design for the nation’s largest HCP under the Endangered Species Act in Clark County, Nevada. Dr. Murphy recently served as team leader for the committee of scientists carrying out the Lake Tahoe Watershed Assessment, a presidential deliverable to the Tahoe Federal Interagency Partnership via the U.S. Forest Service. ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING Edwin E. Herricks is professor of environmental biology in the Environmental Engineering and Science Program in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Illinois. He also holds affiliate appointments in the Departments of Animal Biology (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) and Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences (College of Agriculture, Community, Consumer, and Environmental Sciences)

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River and on the Environmental Council. Dr. Herricks earned a BA in zoology and English from the University of Kansas in 1968, an MS in sanitary and environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University in 1970, and a PhD in biology from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University in 1973. He was a research and field biologist with Union Carbide Corporation from 1973 to 1975. While at the University of Illinois, Dr. Herrick’s research, teaching, and professional activities were related to a program that couples understanding of the environment with engineering-based approaches to management and regulation. As a biologist, he focused this program on the analysis and interpretation of the effects of contaminants and other environmental alterations on communities of organisms (in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems). His research analyzes and interprets the effects of environmental change on species, populations, and communities of organisms, with emphasis on the development of methods to improve environmental decision making and ecologically relevant engineering design. Specific research subjects include development of biological monitoring procedures for environmental decision making; time-related consequences of environmental change ranging from stormwater runoff to climate-change effects; analysis of organismhabitat relationships in streams and wetlands directed to restoration and naturalization; systems analysis of interactions between human and natural systems, including transportation-system interactions with wildlife; and development of engineering design approaches that minimize environmental and ecological impact. FLUVIAL HYDRAULICS AND HYDROLOGY Hsieh Wen Shen, emeritus professor of civil and environmental engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, taught graduate courses on erosion, sedimentation, environmental river mechanics, and river engineering and undergraduate courses in fluid mechanics and basic hydrology. He earned a BS and an MS in civil engineering from the University of Michigan and a PhD in hydraulics from the University of California, Berkeley. He has investigated behavior of numerous rivers, including the Nile in Egypt for the United Nations, the Cauca River in Colombia for the World Bank, and the Mississippi in the United States. In recognition of his contributions in various fields, Dr. Shen received the Horton Award in hydrology from the American Geophysical Union, the Einstein Award in fluvial hydraulics from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Special Creative Awards in sediment mechanics from the U.S. National Science Foundation, the Humboldt Foundation Senior Distinguished U.S. Scientist Award in fluvial hydraulics from the German government, and the annual Joan Hodges Queneau Award in environment conservation

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River jointly from the U.S. National Audubon Society and the American Association of Engineering Societies. Dr. Shen was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1993. WATER-RESOURCES MANAGEMENT Katharine L. Jacobs recently joined the faculty of the University of Arizona as an associate professor in soil, water, and environmental science and a water-management specialist in the Water Resources Research Center. She is also affiliated with the Institute for the Study of the Planet Earth and with the NSF Science and Technology Center on Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology and Riparian Areas (SAHRA). She previously was special assistant for policy and planning for the Arizona Department of Water Resources (ADWR), where she worked on rural water-resources issues and a drought plan for the state. She was the director of the Tucson Active Management Area (AMA) of the ADWR from 1988 through 2001. In 2001-2002, she worked on a special project at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration focused on the interface between scientific information, policy, and decision making. Ms. Jacobs earned her MLA in environmental planning from the University of California, Berkeley. Her expertise is in groundwater management and developing practical, appropriate solutions to difficult public-policy issues. She has been involved in all aspects of implementation of the 1980 Groundwater Management Act, including establishing water rights and permits; developing mandatory conservation requirements for municipal, agricultural, and industrial water users; developing plans for artificial recharge; and writing the Assured Water Supply Rules that require new subdivisions in AMAs to prove a 100-year supply of water. She served on the Synthesis Team for the U.S. National Assessment of the Consequences of Climate Variability and Change and on two other National Research Council panels, the Committee on Valuing Groundwater (1994) and the Committee on the U.S. Climate Change Science Program Strategic Plan (2003). CIVIL ENGINEERING Richard N. Palmer is a professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Washington. He earned a BS in civil engineering from Lamar University in 1972, an MS in environmental engineering from Stanford University in 1973, and a PhD in environmental engineering from The Johns Hopkins University in 1979. He is the author of over 80 refereed papers, conference papers, and technical reports. He is a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and is a registered professional engineer in the state of Washington. Dr. Palmer

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River received the Service to the Professional Award from the Water Resources Planning and Management Division of ASCE in 1998. He was awarded the Certificate of Recognition for his editorial services to the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management of ASCE in 1997, for which he was editor from 1993 to1997. Dr. Palmer was awarded the Huber Award for Research Excellence by ASCE in 1992; this honor was based on his innovative application of simulation and optimization techniques to issues in water-resources management. His paper “Operational Guidance During Droughts: An Expert System Approach” was awarded the Prize for Best Practice-Oriented Paper of the Year in the Journal of Water Resources Planning and Management by the ASCE in 1989. Dr. Palmer’s primary interests are in the application of structured planning approaches to water resources, including reservoir management, the application of decision support and expert systems to civil engineering management problems, and real-time water-resources management, particularly as applied to drought. He has also developed the field of “shared-vision models” in water-resources planning, a technique that incorporates stakeholders into the model building process. A primary theme in his work has been the development and application of tools that have application in nondeterministic settings, that is, those in which uncertainty and forecasts play an important role in solving the problems. ENDANGERED SPECIES LAW AND ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY Holly Doremus is professor of law at the University of California, Davis, where she teaches environmental law, land-use planning law, public-lands management, and property law. Dr. Doremus earned a BS in biology from Trinity College in 1981, a PhD in plant biology from Cornell University in 1986, and a JD from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1991. She has written and presented extensively on protection and restoration of endangered species, biological diversity, adaptive management, and the effective use of science in environmental policy. AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS Frank Lupi has a joint appointment at Michigan State University as associate professor of environmental and natural-resource economics in the Departments of Agricultural Economics and Fisheries and Wildlife. He earned a BS and an MS from the University of Illinois and a PhD from the University of Minnesota in 1997. His applied research focuses on fisheries, wildlife, and natural-resources management issues. Dr. Lupi serves as the economist in the Partnership for Ecosystem Research and Management, a cooperative venture between university-based faculty and various state and

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River federal fish, wildlife, and natural-resources management agencies in the Great Lakes region. He has extensive experience in modeling the demand for and value of natural resources. Dr. Lupi is nationally recognized for his work with travel-cost and stated-preference methods of demand estimation, nonmarket valuation, and choice modeling. He has served as president of U.S. Department of Agriculture Multistate Research Project W133: Benefits and Costs of Resource Policies Affecting Public and Private Land, a national project that deals with benefit-cost analysis and nonmarket valuation for natural-resources planning. Dr. Lupi has served as an associate editor of the North American Journal of Fisheries Management and has served on the Great Lakes Panel of Environmental Economists, sponsored by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Coastal Oceans Program and the Northeast-Midwest Institute. ENVIRONMENTAL AGRICULTURE James Anthony Thompson is a farmer who operates the Willow Lake Farm near Windom, Minnesota. He earned a BS in agronomy and continued with graduate studies in plant-community ecology at Montana State University, Bozeman. With help from the Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s Energy and Sustainable Agriculture Grant Program, he has been increasing the biodiversity of his cropping system, planting understory forage grasses and legumes in his corn and soybean fields. Over a period of many years, he has preserved a large expanse of native prairie and now harvests seed for ecological restoration from these sites. The Willow Lake Farm hosts an Annual Agroecology Summit with support from neighbors, and many local, regional and national agencies and organizations. This locally focused event brings together farmers, ecologists, crop consultants, agency representatives, academics, consumer advocates, and citizens to discuss the merits and implementation of agroecological practices and concepts. Mr. Thompson is a board member of the Craighead Environmental Research Institute. LAND USE Lisa M. Butler Harrington is associate professor of geography at Kansas State University. Dr. Harrington earned a BS from Colorado State University in 1979, an MS from Clemson University in 1982, and a PhD from the University of Oklahoma in 1986. Her research interests include natural resources and land management, environmental change, biotic resources, human-environment relations, rural landscapes, and public lands. She has been involved in the multiuniversity Global Change in Local Places and Human-Environment Regional Observatory research projects, with funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the National Aeronautics

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Endangered and Threatened Species of the Platte River and Space Administration, and the Department of Energy’s National Institute for Global Environmental Change. Her professional service includes membership on NSF Doctoral Dissertation Research Improvement panels and the Association of American Geographers’ (AAG) research committee, chairmanship of an AAG specialty group, and board membership for the Natural Resources and Environmental Science secondary major at Kansas State University.