F
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

John E.Vanderveen, Ph.D. (chair), is a former director of the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Office of Plant and Dairy Foods and Beverages in Washington, D.C. His previous position at FDA was as director of the Division of Nutrition at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. He also served in various capacities (both military and civilian) at the U.S. Air Force (USAF) School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas. During his time in the Air Force, Dr. Vanderveen participated in the development of USAF body composition standards. He has received numerous accolades for service from both FDA and USAF. Dr. Vanderveen is a member of ASCN, the American Society for Nutritional Sciences (ASNS), the Aerospace Medical Association, the American Dairy Science Association, and the American Chemical Society. He is a fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and an honorary member of the American Dietetic Association (ADA). He has served as treasurer of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition (ASCN) and as a member of IFT’s National Academy of Sciences Advisory Committee. Dr. Vanderveen holds a B.S. in agriculture from Rutgers University in New Jersey and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of New Hampshire.

Bruce R.Bistrian, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of Clinical Nutrition, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Formerly he was codirector of Hyperalimentation Services, New England Deaconess Hospital, and a lecturer in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He earned his M.D. from Cornell University, his M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism from MIT. Dr. Bistrian’s primary research interests include nutritional assessment, metabolic effects of acute infections, nutritional support of hospitalized patients, and the pathophysiology of protein-calorie malnutrition. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and received an Award of Merit from Harvard University and the Army Commendation Medal for his services as a Captain in the Medical Corps



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Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance F Biographical Sketches of Committee Members John E.Vanderveen, Ph.D. (chair), is a former director of the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) Office of Plant and Dairy Foods and Beverages in Washington, D.C. His previous position at FDA was as director of the Division of Nutrition at the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition. He also served in various capacities (both military and civilian) at the U.S. Air Force (USAF) School of Aerospace Medicine at Brooks Air Force Base, Texas. During his time in the Air Force, Dr. Vanderveen participated in the development of USAF body composition standards. He has received numerous accolades for service from both FDA and USAF. Dr. Vanderveen is a member of ASCN, the American Society for Nutritional Sciences (ASNS), the Aerospace Medical Association, the American Dairy Science Association, and the American Chemical Society. He is a fellow of the Institute of Food Technologists (IFT) and an honorary member of the American Dietetic Association (ADA). He has served as treasurer of the American Society for Clinical Nutrition (ASCN) and as a member of IFT’s National Academy of Sciences Advisory Committee. Dr. Vanderveen holds a B.S. in agriculture from Rutgers University in New Jersey and a Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of New Hampshire. Bruce R.Bistrian, M.D., M.P.H., Ph.D., is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and chief of Clinical Nutrition, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. Formerly he was codirector of Hyperalimentation Services, New England Deaconess Hospital, and a lecturer in the Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He earned his M.D. from Cornell University, his M.P.H. from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, and his Ph.D. in nutritional biochemistry and metabolism from MIT. Dr. Bistrian’s primary research interests include nutritional assessment, metabolic effects of acute infections, nutritional support of hospitalized patients, and the pathophysiology of protein-calorie malnutrition. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians and received an Award of Merit from Harvard University and the Army Commendation Medal for his services as a Captain in the Medical Corps

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Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance of the U.S. Army 7th Special Forces Group. Dr. Bistrian was president of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vice-president and president of ASCN, and a member of the board of directors of the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology. He served on the editorial boards of numerous nutrition and medical journals and is the author or coauthor of over 400 articles in scientific publications. John Caldwell, Jr., Ph.D., is the principal research psychologist with the Warfighter Fatigue Countermeasures Program at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Brooks Air Force Base, Texas. He has published over 80 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals and laboratory technical reports. He frequently lectures at safety briefings and scientific symposia, and he conducts operationally focused workshops on fatigue countermeasures for aviators and industrial personnel. He is a member of the National Sleep Foundation’s Speakers Bureau and Science Advisory Council, and he frequently consults with various organizations on the effects of fatigue on pilots and methods for overcoming the adverse impact of fatigue in the aviation environment. Dr. Caldwell received his Ph.D. in experimental psychology in 1984 from the University of Southern Mississippi. In 1983 he became the assistant director of the Behavioral Medicine Laboratory at Children’s Hospital National Medical Center in Washington, D.C., where he spent 3 years. Afterward, he spent 16 years with the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command conducting studies on methods of aviator status monitoring and on the effects of medications on aviator performance in specially instrumented flight simulators and aircraft. In August 2002 he transferred to the Air Force Research Laboratory at Brooks. The focus of his research is to fully understand the effects of sleep deprivation on pilots and to develop monitoring methodologies and fatigue countermeasures for use in the operational aviation environment. Key accomplishments have included the first-ever controlled aviator flight-performance evaluations of the efficacy of dextroamphetamine and modafinil for sustaining performance and the completion of several unique protocols investigating the feasibility of real-time monitoring of aviator physiological activity in flight. Johanna T.Dwyer, D.Sc., R.D., is director of the Frances Stern Nutrition Center at New England Medical Center and a professor in the Departments of Medicine and of Community Health at the Tufts Medical School and School of Nutrition Science and Policy in Boston. She is also a senior scientist at the Jean Mayer U.S. Department of Agriculture Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging at Tufts University. Dr. Dwyer’s work centers on life-cycle related concerns, such as the prevention of diet-related disease in children and adolescents and maximization of quality of life and health in the elderly. She also has a long-standing interest in vegetarian and other alternative lifestyles. Dr. Dwyer is currently the editor of Nutrition Today and on the editorial boards of Family Economics and Nutrition Reviews. She received her D.Sc. and M.Sc. from the Harvard School of Public Health, an M.S. from the University of Wisconsin, and

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Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance completed her undergraduate degree with distinction from Cornell University. She is a member of the Institute of Medicine, the Technical Advisory Committee of the Nutrition Screening Initiative, and a past president of ASNS, a past secretary of ASCN, and a past president of the Society for Nutrition Education. John W.Erdman, Jr., Ph.D., is a professor of nutrition and food science in the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition and a professor in the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. His research interests include the effects of food processing upon nutrient retention, the metabolic roles of vitamin A and beta-carotene, and the bioavailability of minerals from foods. His research regarding soy protein has extended into studies on the impact of non-nutrient components of foods, such as phytoestrogens on chronic disease. Dr. Erdman has published over 110 peer-reviewed research papers. He has authored or edited six books and major symposia proceedings. In 1994 he received the Borden Award for “distinctive research on the nutritional significance of any food or food component” from ASNS. In 1998 he chaired a Gordon Conference on Carotenoids, was a Burroughs Wellcome Visiting Professor in Basic Medical Sciences at the University of Georgia, and the G.Malcolm Trout Visiting Scholar at Michigan State University. In 1999 he received the Babcock-Hart Award from IFT. Dr. Erdman has served on many editorial boards, including: Journal of Food Science, Cereal Chemistry, Journal of Nutrition, and Plant Foods for Human Nutrition. He has also served on many program and planning committees for ASNS, IFT, and the National Academy of Sciences. In 1992 he was elected a fellow of IFT. Dr. Erdman received his M.S. and Ph.D. in food science from Rutgers University. Helen W.Lane, Ph.D., R.D., is the chief nutritionist for NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration), and chief scientist for the Johnson Space Center’s Habitability, Environmental Factors, and Bioastronautics Office. She has also served as the assistant to the Director for Advanced Program Coordination and Research and branch chief for Biomedical Operations and Countermeasures. Dr. Lane was an associate professor of nutrition at the University of Texas Medical Center from 1977 to 1984 and a professor of nutrition at Auburn University from 1984 to 1989. At present she serves as an adjunct professor, Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. She has led efforts to define nutritional requirements for healthy crew members during spaceflight. Dr. Lane has completed research on body composition and on nutritional requirements for energy, water, electrolytes, protein, calcium, and iron, as well as clinical and basic research on selenium and breast cancer. As a registered dietitian, she is active in the ADA. She is also a member of ASNS and ASCN. Melinda M.Manore, Ph.D., R.D., is currently a professor and chair, Department of Nutrition, Oregon State University, and is a registered dietitian. Her research interests include the interaction of nutrition and exercise in health, ex-

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Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance ercise performance, disease prevention, and reduction of chronic disease across the life cycle. Dr. Manore’s research also focuses on factors regulating energy balance (i.e., energy expenditure, eating behaviors, and body weight and composition), and the role of nutrition, exercise, and energy balance on the reproductive cycle. She is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), and a member of ADA, ASCN, ASNS, and the North American Association for the Study of Obesity. She is currently chair of the ADA Nutrition Research Practice Group and received the ADA’s Sports, Cardiovascular and Wellness Nutritionists Excellence in Practice award in 2001. Dr. Manore currently serves as a member of the USA Gymnastics National Health Advisory Board, the Gatorade Sport Science Institute Nutrition Board, and the Arizona Osteoporosis Coalition Medical Advisory Board. She is associate editor for Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise and ACSM’s Health and Fitness Journal and is on the editorial boards of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association and the International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism. Dr. Manore obtained her M.S. in health education and community health from the University of Oregon and her Ph.D. in human nutrition from Oregon State University. William P.Morgan, Ed.D., is a professor of kinesiology and director of the Exercise Psychology Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Formerly he was a professor of physical education and director of the Sport Psychology Laboratory at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Dr. Morgan also spent 2 years as a visiting research psychologist, U.S. Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine in Natick, MA. He earned an M.A. in health and physical education from the University of Maryland and an Ed.D. in psychology and physical education from the University of Toledo. Dr. Morgan’s primary research interests focus on the antidepressant and anxiolytic effects of vigorous physical activity and selected psychological states and traits for developing prediction models that could be used for predicting panic behavior (and thus survival) in individuals performing physical activity in extreme environments. He has received numerous awards, including the Service Award of the Wisconsin Association for Health, Physical Education and Recreation; the Citation Award of ACSM; corecipient (with Dr. Peter B.Raven) of the John M.White Award for best research on respiratory protection from the American Industrial Hygiene Association; and the Medal of the Swedish Society of Medicine. Dr. Morgan has served as vice-president of the North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity, vice-president of ACSM, and president of the Division of Psychological Hypnosis of the American Psychological Association. He has served on the editorial boards of a number of sports, exercise, and psychology journals and has authored or coauthored over 200 articles in scientific publications. Patrick M.O’Neil, Ph.D., is a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at the Medical University of South Carolina, where he is also director of the

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Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance Weight Management Center. Dr. O’Neil has been involved in the study of obesity and its management since 1977, including clinical trials, basic research, teaching, and public education. He has been the principal investigator on a number of clinical trials of weight-loss agents. He is the author of over 100 professional publications primarily concerning psychological, behavioral, and other clinical aspects of obesity and its management. Dr. O’Neil has served on the Education Committee of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity since 1994 and was a member of its Ad Hoc Committee for Development of the Practical Guidelines. He is also immediate past president of the South Carolina Academy of Professional Psychologists, former member and chair of the South Carolina Board of Examiners in Psychology, and former chair of the Obesity and Eating Disorders Special Interest Group of the Association for the Advancement of Behavior Therapy. Dr. O’Neil received his B.S. in economics from Louisiana State University and his M.S. and Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Georgia. Esther M.Sternberg, M.D., is chief of the Section on Neuroendocrine Immunology and Behavior and associate branch chief of the Clinical Neuroendocrinology Branch of the National Institute of Mental Health Intramural Research Program at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Dr. Sternberg received her M.D. and trained in rheumatology at McGill University, Montreal, Canada. She did post doctoral training at Washington University, Barnes Hospital, St. Louis, in the Division of Allergy and Immunology. She was subsequently a Howard Hughes associate and instructor in medicine at Washington University and Barnes Hospital before joining NIH. Dr. Sternberg is internationally recognized for her ground-breaking discoveries in the area of central nervous system-immune system interactions. She received the Arthritis Foundation William R.Felts Award for Excellence in Rheumatology Research Publications, was awarded the Public Health Service Superior Service Award, and was elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation in recognition of this work. Dr. Sternberg is also internationally recognized as a foremost authority on the L-Tryptophan Eosinophilia Myalgia Syndrome. She was the first to describe this syndrome in relation to a similar drug, L-5-hydroxytryptophan, and published this landmark work in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1980. Beverly J.Tepper, Ph.D., is an associate professor of food science at Cook College, Rutgers University. Her primary areas of research are the sensory evaluation, perception, and preference for foods; food intake regulation; and the effects of genetics, disease, and dietary restraint on food ingestion and eating behavior. She has published extensively in these areas. Formerly, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Monell Chemical Senses Center. Dr. Tepper earned her M.S. and Ph.D. in nutrition from Tufts University. She currently serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Sensory Studies and has served as a reviewer for the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Appetite, Brain Research

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Monitoring Metabolic Status: Predicting Decrements in Physiological and Cognitive Performance Bulletin, European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Journal of Food Science, Nutrition Research, and Physiology and Behavior. Julian Thayer, Ph.D., is head of the Program on Emotions and Quantitative Psychophysiology, which he initiated, at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) of NIH. Prior to joining NIA, he held academic positions at Penn State University and the University of Missouri. His research interests concern biological and psychological adaptation and flexibility in the context of dynamic systems models with applications to psychopathology, pathophysiology, and health. This work utilizes indices of autonomic nervous system function derived from cardiac variability measures to probe whole organism systems. He received a B.A. in psychology from Indiana University and a Master’s and Ph.D. from New York University.