Appendix B
Workshop Participants and Biographies

LIST OF PARTICIPANTS

Charles M. Vest, President, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Workshop Co-Chair

Marye Anne Fox, Chancellor, North Carolina State University, Workshop Co-Chair

Thurman J. Allard, Director of Homeland Security, Sandia National Laboratories

Melvin Bernstein, Director of University Programs, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security

Thomas Blau, Professor, School for National Security Executive Education, National Defense University

Joseph Bordogna, Deputy Director, National Science Foundation

Lewis M. Branscomb, Professor Emeritus, Public Policy, and Corporate Management, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University

W. Seth Carus, Deputy Director, Center for Counterproliferation Research, National Defense University

Elizabeth L. Grossman, Professional Staff, Committee on Science, U.S. House of Representatives

William Happer, Professor, Department of Physics, Princeton University

Maureen I. McCarthy, Director of Research and Development, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security

M. Granger Morgan, Professor and Head, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University

Randall S. Murch, Science and Technology Division, Institute for Defense Analyses

Kenneth I. Shine, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, The University of Texas System

Neil J. Smelser, University Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley

Gary W. Strong, Manager, Behavioral and Biometrics Programs, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security

Lydia W. Thomas, President and CEO, Mitretek Systems

Fawwaz T. Ulaby, Vice President for Research, University of Michigan

Vincent Vitto, President and CEO, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc.

William A. Wulf, President, National Academy of Engineering

National Research Council Staff

Peter D. Blair, Executive Director, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

Alan Shaw, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences



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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop Appendix B Workshop Participants and Biographies LIST OF PARTICIPANTS Charles M. Vest, President, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Workshop Co-Chair Marye Anne Fox, Chancellor, North Carolina State University, Workshop Co-Chair Thurman J. Allard, Director of Homeland Security, Sandia National Laboratories Melvin Bernstein, Director of University Programs, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security Thomas Blau, Professor, School for National Security Executive Education, National Defense University Joseph Bordogna, Deputy Director, National Science Foundation Lewis M. Branscomb, Professor Emeritus, Public Policy, and Corporate Management, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University W. Seth Carus, Deputy Director, Center for Counterproliferation Research, National Defense University Elizabeth L. Grossman, Professional Staff, Committee on Science, U.S. House of Representatives William Happer, Professor, Department of Physics, Princeton University Maureen I. McCarthy, Director of Research and Development, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security M. Granger Morgan, Professor and Head, Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Carnegie Mellon University Randall S. Murch, Science and Technology Division, Institute for Defense Analyses Kenneth I. Shine, Executive Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs, The University of Texas System Neil J. Smelser, University Professor of Sociology, Emeritus, University of California, Berkeley Gary W. Strong, Manager, Behavioral and Biometrics Programs, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security Lydia W. Thomas, President and CEO, Mitretek Systems Fawwaz T. Ulaby, Vice President for Research, University of Michigan Vincent Vitto, President and CEO, The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. William A. Wulf, President, National Academy of Engineering National Research Council Staff Peter D. Blair, Executive Director, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences Alan Shaw, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences

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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop BIOGRAPHIES OF PARTICIPANTS Charles M. Vest, Workshop Co-chair, has been president of MIT since 1990. During this time he has placed special emphasis on enhancing undergraduate education, exploring new organizational forms to meet emerging directions in research and education, building a stronger international dimension into education and research programs, developing stronger relations with industry, and enhancing racial and cultural diversity at MIT. He also has devoted considerable energy to bringing issues concerning education and research to broader public attention and to strengthening national policy on science, engineering, and education. Dr. Vest chaired the President’s Advisory Committee on the Redesign of the Space Station and has served as a member of the President’s Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), the Massachusetts Governor’s Council on Economic Growth and Technology, and the National Research Council’s Board on Engineering Education. He chairs the U.S. Department of Energy Task Force on the Future of Science Programs and is vice chair of the Council on Competitiveness and immediate past chair of the Association of American Universities (AAU). He sits on the board of directors of both IBM and E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. As a member of the mechanical engineering faculty at MIT, Vest has research interests in the thermal sciences and the engineering applications of lasers and coherent optics. He earned his B.S. degree in mechanical engineering from West Virginia University in 1963 and both his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan in 1964 and 1967, respectively. Marye Anne Fox, Workshop Co-chair, is the twelfth chancellor of North Carolina State University. Before her appointment at NC State, Dr. Fox was the M. June and J. Virgil Waggoner Regents Chair in Chemistry and vice president for research at the University of Texas at Austin, where she was responsible for administrative support for research both on and off the campus at Austin. In 1996-1997, this research enterprise included $246 million in sponsored research which extended over a broad range of university departments and interdisciplinary units. Dr. Fox is a frequent lecturer on science education reform and is currently president of the Association for Women in Science. She has served as co-chair of a National Science Foundation/National Science Board taskforce on graduate education and has served on state and National Research Council advisory panels. She now chairs the National Research Council’s Committee on Undergraduate Science Education and serves on the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy. She is president of Sigma Xi. Dr. Fox was elected co-chair of the National Academy of Sciences’ Council of Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable. She currently serves on the boards of W.R. Grace, Inc. and the Stanford Research Institute, and on scientific advisory boards for the Welch, Dreyfus, and Packard Foundations. From 1994 to 1996 she served as vice chairman of the National Science Board and chaired its Committee on Programs and Plans from 1991 to 1994. She serves on a large number of state, national, and professional society boards and has published extensively in organic photochemistry and electrochemistry. Her work has clear application in materials science, solar energy conversion, and environmental chemistry. She has been elected to membership in the National Academy of Sciences and the American Philosophical Society and is a fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has received numerous professional awards. Dr. Fox received her B.S. from Notre Dame College and a Ph.D. degree from Dartmouth College, both in chemistry. After a postdoctoral appointment at the University of Maryland, she joined the University of Texas at Austin in 1976. Thurman John (T.J.) Allard leads Sandia National Laboratories’ Homeland Security Office. He is responsible for guiding and overseeing all of its terrorism-combating activities and is also Sandia’s point of contact for the Department of Homeland Security. Prior to his current

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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop assignment, he led Sandia’s Executive Staff, whose responsibilities include corporate strategic planning, acting as Sandia’s primary interface to Congress, and supporting Sandia’s president and executive vice-president in the strategic and tactical operations of the laboratories. Melvin Bernstein has directed the Office of University Programs, Office of Research and Development, in the Science and Technology Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) since June 1, 2003. Dr. Bernstein came to DHS from Tufts University, where he is a research professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. Previously, he served as professor and head of the Department of Metallurgy and Materials Science at Carnegie Mellon University; provost and then chancellor at the Illinois Institute of Technology; academic vice president and dean of the faculties at Tufts University; and most recently, provost and senior vice president for academic affairs at Brandeis University. Other relevant experience includes liaison scientist at the London office of the Office of Naval Research; member of the National Materials Advisory Board of the National Research Council; and panel chair of the National Research Council study Materials Science and Engineering for the 1990s. Thomas Blau is a professor of national security decision making, National Defense University, School for National Security Executive Education (SNSEE). At SNSEE, he creates and manages new courses and programs on homeland security and homeland defense, defense transformation, decision making, and counterterrorism. These programs serve U.S. executive and legislative branch professionals, foreign military officers, and specialized agencies including the General Accounting Office. He is also a research professor of public policy, George Mason University, where he teaches courses on national security and on strategic management. He has been an international aerospace business consultant, on staff in the U.S. Senate and in the Department of Energy, and a consultant to the U.S. government, with a focus on strategic defense, technology security, energy security, nuclear proliferation, and nuclear forces. He has lectured in Europe and South America on U.S. security policy. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he studied political science and economics. His publications on security and business matters have appeared in the Asian Wall Street Journal, the Journal of Commerce, NATO’s 16 Nations, Military Technology, Aviation Week & Space Technology, Sea Power, Defense & Security Review (London), various edited volumes, and numerous proprietary studies. Joseph Bordogna is deputy director and chief operating officer of the National Science Foundation, and he served previously as head of NSF’s Directorate for Engineering. Complementing his NSF duties, he is a member of the President’s Management Council; has chaired committees on manufacturing, environmental technologies, and automotive technologies within the President’s National Science and Technology Council; and was a member of the U.S.-Japan Joint Optoelectronics Project. Prior to his appointment at NSF, he served at the University of Pennsylvania as Alfred Fitler Moore Professor of Engineering, director of the Moore School of Electrical Engineering, dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science, and faculty master of Stouffer College House. Dr. Bordogna is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), and the International Engineering Consortium and a fellow and former president of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE). He has made contributions to the engineering profession in a variety of areas, including early laser communications systems, electro-optic recording materials, holographic television playback systems, and early space capsule recovery. He received the B.S.E.E. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Pennsylvania and the S.M. degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Lewis M. Branscomb is the emeritus Aetna Professor of Public Policy and Corporate Management and emeritus director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program in the

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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop Center for Science and International Affairs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. Dr. Branscomb, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine, has a background in physics and public policy. He was a research physicist at the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology) and also served as its director. He was the founder and first director of the Joint Institute for Laboratory Astrophysics at the University of Colorado and an at-large director of the Associated Universities for Research in Astronomy. He served on the President’s Science Advisory Committee (PSAC), where he chaired the PSAC committee on space science and technology during Project Apollo. Dr. Branscomb served as vice president and chief scientist of IBM Corporation until his retirement in 1986. Dr. Branscomb is a former president of the American Physical Society and of Sigma Xi, the Scientific Research Society. W. Seth Carus is a Distinguished Research Professor at the National Defense University (NDU) and the deputy director of the university’s Center for Counterproliferation Research. He has been at NDU since 1997. His research focuses on homeland security, biodefense and biological warfare threat, consequence management, and the role of the Department of Defense in responding to chemical and biological terrorism. He also is researching allegations of biological agent use by terrorists and criminals and has published a working paper, “Bioterrorism and Biocrimes: The Illicit Use of Biological Agents in the 20th Century,” and several articles on that subject. From 2001 to 2003, Dr. Carus was the senior advisor to the vice president for biodefense. Prior to that he was on the staff of the National Preparedness Review and then worked with the Office of Homeland Security while it was being established. Before joining NDU, Dr. Carus was on the staff of the Center for Naval Analyses. From 1991 to 1994, he was a member of the policy planning staff of the undersecretary of defense for policy, Office of the Secretary of Defense. Before joining the government, he was a research fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. He has a Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University. Elizabeth L. Grossman is a professional staff member at the Science Committee of the U.S. House of Representatives. She is responsible for issues in homeland security, nanotechnology, and cybersecurity and also for general issues affecting the conduct of research. Before joining the Science Committee in January 2003, she spent 6 years at the National Academy of Sciences, where she worked on a variety of studies on science, technology, and public policy, including the National Research Council report Making the Nation Safer: The Role of Science and Technology in Countering Terrorism. She holds a B.A. in physics and mathematics from Swarthmore College and a Ph.D. in computational physics from the University of Chicago. William Happer, a professor in the Department of Physics at Princeton University, is a specialist in modern optics, optical and radio-frequency spectroscopy of atoms and molecules, and spin-polarized atoms and nuclei. Dr. Happer began his academic career in 1964 at the Physics Department of Columbia University, rising to the rank of full professor. While serving as a professor of physics he also served as co-director of the Columbia Radiation Laboratory from 1971 to 1976, and director from 1976 to 1979. In l980 he joined the faculty at Princeton University. He was named the Class of 1909 Professor of Physics in 1988. On August 5, 1991, Dr. Happer was appointed director of energy research in the Department of Energy by President George Bush, where he oversaw a basic research budget of some $3 billion, which included much of the federal funding for high energy and nuclear physics, materials science, magnetic confinement fusion, environmental science, the human genome project, and other areas. After leaving DOE on May 31, 1993, he was reappointed professor of physics at Princeton University on June 1, 1993, and named Eugene Higgens Professor of Physics and chair of the University Research Board in 1995. In 2003 he was named to the Cyrus Fogg Brackett Chair of Physics. Dr. Happer has served as a consultant to numerous firms, charitable foundations, and government

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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop agencies. From 1987 to 1990 he served as chairman of the Steering Committee of JASON, a group of scientists and engineers who advise agencies of the federal government on matters of defense, intelligence, energy policy, and other technical problems. He is a trustee of the MITRE Corporation, the Richard Lounsbery Foundation, and the Marshall Institute. He was a co-founder in 1994 of Magnetic Imaging Technologies Incorporated (MITI), a small company specializing in the use of laser polarized noble gases for magnetic resonance imaging. Dr. Happer is a fellow of the American Physical Society and the American Association for the Advancement of Science and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Philosophical Society. He was awarded an Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in 1966, an Alexander von Humboldt Award in 1976, the 1997 Broida Prize and the 1999 Davisson-Germer Prize of the American Physical Society, and the Thomas Alva Edison Patent Award in 2000. He received a B.S. degree in physics from the University of North Carolina in l960 and the Ph.D. degree in physics from Princeton University in l964. Maureen I. McCarthy is the director, Research and Development, Science and Technology Directorate, Department of Homeland Security. She is responsible for management of programs and facilities at DHS federal and national laboratories, strategic partnerships with other federal agencies, university fellowships and centers of excellence, international cooperation, and technical support to incident management. From August 2002 to March 2003, Dr. McCarthy was the senior representative from the Department of Energy to the Homeland Security Transition Planning Office, and deputy team captain, Science and Technology. From March 2000 to March 2003 she served as chief scientist, National Nuclear Security Administration, Department of Energy, and from March 1999 to March 2000 she was senior advisor for national security and nuclear energy to the secretary of energy and senior science advisor to the assistant secretary for nonproliferation and national security, Department of Energy. Before coming to DOE, Dr. McCarthy was an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Defense Policy Fellow to the Office of the Secretary of Defense, at which she specialized in arms control implementation and compliance matters. From 1991 to 1997 she was a senior staff scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where she directed the interface physics group. She holds a B.Sc. in chemistry from Boston College (1983) and a Ph.D. in chemical physics from the University of Colorado (1988). She is the recipient of several professional awards, including the NNSA Administrators Silver Medal for Outstanding Service, and the Lady Davis Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1988-1991). M. Granger Morgan is a professor and head of the Department of Engineering and Public Policy, Lord Chair Professor in Engineering, a professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and a professor in the H. John Heinz III School of Public Policy and Management at Carnegie Mellon University. He is interested in a wide range of problems in science, technology, and public policy. These include integrated assessment and uncertainty in policy analysis; risk analysis, management, and communication; and technology and R&D policy. Much of his work has involved the development and demonstration of methods to characterize and analyze uncertainty. With colleagues in the Center for the Integrated Study of the Human Dimensions of Global Change he has addressed issues in the integrated assessment of climate change impacts and policy. With colleagues in the Electricity Industry Center he is exploring problems such as distributed resources, carbon management, and basic technology research to support clean energy. He has worked extensively in risk analysis, communication, and ranking. He is an active participant in the Center for the Study and Improvement of Regulation. Professor Morgan holds the following degrees: B.A. (physics) 1963, Harvard College; M.S. (astronomy and space science) 1965, Cornell University; and Ph.D. (applied physics and information science) 1968, University of California, San Diego. He has participated in several major Academies’

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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop activities, some of which he has chaired. He is currently a member of the Committee on the Human Dimensions of Global Change. Randall S. Murch is the director, Technology Discovery and Insertion Group, Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, Virginia, which designs and performs studies and analyses on topics involving science and technology and their application to solving difficult challenges for intelligence, homeland security, and counterterrorism. From January 1980 to November 2002, he was a special agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation; his activities included performing counterterrorism and counterintelligence investigations; serving as a forensic biologist and research scientist in the FBI Laboratory; and serving as a planning officer for complex technical national security projects, Intelligence Division, FBI Headquarters. His career has included leading R&D efforts and managing detailed technical support to investigations. From 1995 to 1999, Dr. Murch was a section chief (department head) responsible for the core forensic units of the FBI Laboratory, and then as deputy director, FBI Laboratory, he had responsibility for all forensic, research, and counterterrorism response (including WMD) programs of the laboratory. From late 1999 to mid 2001, he was detailed to the Defense Threat Reduction Agency as director, Advanced Systems and Concepts Office. He completed his career with the FBI as the deputy director, Investigative Technology Division Quantico. He holds a B.S. degree from the University of Puget Sound (biology, 1974), an M.S. degree from the University of Hawaii (botanical sciences, 1976), and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois (plant pathology, 1979). He has briefed and served on Defense Science Board and National Academy of Sciences studies and is currently a member of the Board on Life Sciences, National Research Council. Kenneth I. Shine is past president of the Institute of Medicine, National Academies, and professor of medicine emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) School of Medicine. He is UCLA School of Medicine’s immediate past dean and provost for medical sciences. Currently he is a clinical professor of medicine at the Georgetown University School of Medicine. A cardiologist and physiologist, Dr. Shine received his A.B. from Harvard College in 1957 and his M.D. from Harvard Medical School in 1961. Most of his advanced training was at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), where he became chief resident in medicine in 1968. Following his postgraduate training at MGH, he held an appointment as assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. He moved in 1971 to the UCLA School of Medicine and became director of the Coronary Care Unit, chief of the Cardiology Division, and subsequently, chair of the Department of Medicine. As dean at UCLA, Dr. Shine stimulated major initiatives in ambulatory education, community service for medical students and faculty, mathematics and science education in the public schools, and the construction of new research facilities funded entirely by the private sector. Dr. Shine is a member of many honorific and academic societies, including Phi Beta Kappa and Omega Alpha; is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American College of Cardiology, and the American College of Physicians; and was elected to the Institute of Medicine in 1988. He served as chair of the Council of Deans of the Association of American Medical Colleges from 1991 to 1992 and was president of the American Heart Association from 1985 to 1986. Dr. Shine’s research interests include metabolic events in the heart muscle, the relation of behavior to heart disease, and emergency medicine. He participated in efforts to prove the value of cardiopulmonary resuscitation following a heart attack, and in establishing the 911 emergency telephone number in the multi-jurisdictional Los Angeles area. Dr. Shine is the author of numerous articles and scientific papers in the area of heart physiology and clinical research. Neil J. Smelser served as the director of the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences, Stanford, California, from 1994 to August 2001. His research interests are sociological theory, economic sociology, collective behavior, sociology of education, social change, and

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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop comparative methods. From 1958 to 1994 he was on the faculty of the Sociology Department of the University of California, Berkeley, serving as university professor since 1971. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the American Philosophical Society, and the National Academy of Sciences. Gary W. Strong is the director, Behavioral Research and Biometrics, in the Science and Technology Directorate of the Department of Homeland Security. He is currently on detail from the National Science Foundation, where he assisted with interagency coordination of national security and homeland security related programs, managed the computer science cluster of biology-related research programs, and managed a large cross-agency information technology research program. Prior to this, Dr. Strong was on detail to the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency to manage the Translingual Information Detection, Extraction and Summarization Program and co-manage the Bio:Info:Micro Program. Dr. Strong is currently co-chair of two National Science and Technology Council groups: the NSTC Biometrics Working Group and the Social, Behavioral, and Economics Research Subcommittee. Previously, Dr. Strong was a member or the chair of several interagency working groups on information technology research and development. He led the development of a research initiative for every-citizen access to the National Information Infrastructure, commissioning a study by the National Research Council (Computer Science and Telecommunications Board, More Than Screen Deep, National Academy Press, Washington, D.C., 1997) that continues to serve as a reference standard for efforts to bridge the digital divide. Dr. Strong’s international efforts have resulted in the NSF-European Commission multilingual research program, a cooperative science program that involved coordinated peer review on both sides. From 1982 to 1994, Dr. Strong was a faculty member at Drexel University, where he established a new undergraduate degree program in information systems. From 1967 to 1974, he worked at Bell Telephone Laboratories, in the Data Communications Laboratory. He received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan in 1967, his M.S. in electrical engineering from Columbia University in 1969, and his Ph.D. jointly in computer and communication sciences and in anthropology from the University of Michigan in 1981. Lydia W. Thomas is president and CEO of Mitretek Systems, Inc., where she served previously as senior vice president and general manager responsible for strategic planning and leadership of Mitretek’s Center for Environment, Resources and Space. Dr. Thomas was with the MITRE Corporation from 1973 to 1996, where she held a series of technical and management positions, spanning the areas of energy, environment, health, and space systems. Dr. Thomas is a member of the President’s Homeland Security Advisory Council and the Virginia Governor’s Higher Education Summit Steering Committee. She serves on the board of directors of the Cabot Corporation, the United States Energy Association, and the Northern Virginia Technology Council (NVTC). She is a trustee of George Washington University and a corporate member of the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. Dr. Thomas has held several advisory positions for the Department of Defense. She is the recipient of many prestigious professional awards and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, American Society of Toxicology, American Defense Preparedness Association/National Defense Industrial Association, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, and the Teratology Society. She holds a Ph.D. in cytology from Howard University, an M.S. in microbiology from American University, and a B.S. in zoology from Howard University. Fawwaz T. Ulaby is the vice president for research and the R. Jamison and Betty Williams Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and serves on several national scientific boards and commissions. Since joining the University of Michigan faculty in 1984, he has been

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University Research Centers of Excellence for Homeland Security: A Summary Report of a Workshop directing large, interdisciplinary projects, and he was the founding director of a NASA-funded center for space terahertz technology. Dr. Ulaby has authored eight books, contributed chapters to several others, and published over 600 scientific papers and reports. His undergraduate textbook, Applied Electromagnetics, published by Prentice Hall in January 1997, has been adopted by some 80 universities across the United States. He is the recipient of numerous awards, including the Eta Kappa Nu Association C. Holmes MacDonald Award for “An Outstanding Electrical Engineering Professor in the Untied States of America for 1975,” the IEEE Centennial Medal (1984), the American Society of Photogrammetry’s Presidential Citation for Meritorious Service (1984), the Kuwait Prize in applied science (1986), the NASA Group Achievement Award (1990), the University of Michigan’s Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award (1991), the University of Michigan Regents Medal for Meritorious Service (1996), the IEEE Millennium Medal for Outstanding Achievements and Contributions (2000), and the 2001 IEEE Electromagnetics Award. In January 2001 he assumed the position of editor in chief of the IEEE Proceedings. Jointly with Michigan State University, Wayne State University, and the Van Andel Institute, the University of Michigan developed and submitted a proposal to the State of Michigan in FY2000 for establishing a core technology alliance (CTA) composed of five cores focused on genomics, proteomics, structural biology, bioinformatics, and animal models; Dr. Ulaby served as vice president, overall principal investigator, and chair of the CTA executive committee. He holds a B.S. in physics from the American University of Beirut (1964), an M.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Texas, Austin (1966), and a Ph.D. in electrical engineering from the University of Texas, Austin (1968). Vincent Vitto is the president and CEO of Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc., which specializes in guidance, navigation and control, and autonomy and microelectronics. His areas of expertise are communications and surveillance technologies. As assistant director of the Lincoln Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), he was responsible for programs in surface surveillance and communications. Prior to holding that position, Mr. Vitto was head of the Communications Division, which included work on technology and system concept development of military satellite communications systems. Mr. Vitto has been a member of many government advisory boards and panels; he currently is vice chair of the Defense Science Board and chair of the NRC’s Naval Studies Board. William A. Wulf was elected president of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in 1997. The NAE and the National Academy of Sciences operate under a congressional charter to provide advice to government on issues of science and engineering. Dr. Wulf is on leave from the University of Virginia, where he is a university professor. His research spans computer architecture, computer security, programming languages, and optimizing compilers. From 1988 to 1990 Dr. Wulf was also on leave to be assistant director of the National Science Foundation. Prior to joining the University of Virginia, he founded a software company, Tartan Laboratories, based on research he did while on the faculty at Carnegie Mellon University. Dr. Wulf is a member of the National Academy of Engineering, a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a corresponding member of the Academia Espanola De Ingeniera, and a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. He is also a fellow of four professional societies: the ACM, the IEEE, the AAAS, and AWIS. He is the author of over 100 papers and technical reports, has written three books, holds two U.S. patents, and has supervised over 25 Ph.D.s in computer science.